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Slaveholders' Dilemma: Freedom and Progress in Southern Conservative Thought, 1820-1860
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Slaveholders' Dilemma: Freedom and Progress in Southern Conservative Thought, 1820-1860

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In antebellum times slaveholders perceived themselves as thoroughly modern and moral men who were protecting human progress against the perversions spawned by the more radical aspects of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. The slaveholders insisted that, in resisting the religious heresies, infidelity, ultra-democratic politics, and egalitarian dogmas then sweepin ...more
Paperback, 140 pages
Published February 1st 1994 by University of South Carolina Press (first published December 1st 1991)
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Eugene Dominic Genovese was an American historian of the American South and American slavery. He has been noted for bringing a Marxist perspective to the study of power, class and relations between planters and slaves in the South. His work Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made won the Bancroft Prize. He later abandoned the Left and Marxism, and embraced traditionalist conservatism.
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