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Hieronymus Bosch: Garden of Earthly Delights

3.81  ·  Rating Details ·  62 Ratings  ·  10 Reviews
Few paintings inspire the kind of intense study and speculation as the -Garden of Earthly Delights,- the luminous triptych by Nertherlandish master Hieronymus Bosch. The painting has been interpreted as a heretical masterpiece, an opulent illustration of the Creation and a premonition of the end of the world. In this new flexi-cover edition of the book, renowned art histor ...more
Paperback, 128 pages
Published April 28th 2005 by Prestel Publishing (first published 2002)
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Kalliope
Mar 17, 2012 Kalliope rated it it was amazing
Shelves: art

This is a 5 star book for a 10 star painting.


Hans Belting offers in this wonderful book a careful analysis and a rather plausible explanation of one of the most enigmatic paintings that have survived and by one of the most enigmatic painters that have been recorded.

It should be of no surprise that its not quite appropriate title of The Garden of Earthly Delights was not given by its creator Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516). It was appended later on. The painting currently stands in the Prado Museum
...more
Mikey B.
Feb 06, 2017 Mikey B. rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: art
This book is mostly about the triptych painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights” by Hieronymus Bosch. And what an extravaganza it is! An outburst of creativity, an orgy of frolicking – at least in the large middle panel. The first panel is an Adam and Eve depiction and this is crazy! The last panel is “Hell” and this, too, is beyond wild!

Bosch lived from 1450 to 1516 and in many ways was the Salvador Dali of his time. However not much is known of his personal life and how his art was received.
...more
AC
Jan 31, 2013 AC rated it really liked it
The best thing is simply to refer the reader to Kalliope's wonderful review here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

For my part, I found the latter portion of the book, discussing Erasmus and More and the imaginary spaces of paradise to be somewhat oversubtle and hard to follow. This, of course, may simply have been due to my own failure of attention. The first part, however, gives a marvelously clear account of the picture, and the reproductions (of the whole and of the details) are simpl
...more
Amanda at Nerdification Reviews
The works of Hieronymus Bosch are fascinating to me. Especially the Garden of Earhtly Delights.
Angels
Aug 06, 2011 Angels rated it really liked it
I picked up this book on the garden of earthly delights because this enigmatic painting fascinates me as much as anyone who has ever seen the central or hell panels. Belting is a great writer who explains Bosch's vision as well as his environment and the contemporary lines of thought. The first part of the book is dedicated to the paradise, hell, and then central portions of the triptych with an explanation of how the outer panels were used for a 'wow' factor. The rest appeals to the humanistic ...more
Julie
Feb 02, 2017 Julie rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: owned
While I understood and appreciated the compare/contrast with More/Erasmus and Utopia and the whole idea of fictional realities, I wanted to know more about the subtleties within the painting itself. After all, the fabulous up-close illustrations were made for just such an analysis. The parts that dealt with this in the book were the most interesting to my mind.
carelessdestiny
Jan 15, 2012 carelessdestiny rated it really liked it
Shelves: art-stories
it's a very deeply thought out account of the painting which accepts the limitations of knowledge about it and Bosch's life. It also made me realise how the Lynda Harris book overstates the case for Bosch as a secret heretic. The last sentence of the part on Thomas More's "Utopia" is just perfect : The author relates with the voice of another and the reader can only travel by reading.
Manda
Sep 11, 2011 Manda rated it really liked it
I love this painting. So i wrote a paper on it and read some books. This book was the best of them.
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Hans Belting is a German art historian and theorist of medieval and Renaissance art, as well as contemporary art and image theory.

He was born in Andernach, Germany, and studied at the universities of Mainz and Rome, and took his doctorate in art history at the University of Mainz. Subsequently he has held a fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks (Harvard University), Washington, D.C.
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