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I Am Sacajawea, I Am York: Our Journey West with Lewis and Clark
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I Am Sacajawea, I Am York: Our Journey West with Lewis and Clark

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3.70  ·  Rating Details  ·  27 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
When Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery set out in the spring of 1804, they had chosen to go on an unprecedented, extremely dangerous journey. It would be the adventure of a lifetime.

Unlike others in the group, two key members did not choose to join the hazardous expedition: York, Clark's slave, and Sacajawea, considered to be the property of Charbonneau, the expedition'
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Hardcover, 32 pages
Published March 1st 2005 by Walker Childrens
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Libby Erwood
Feb 23, 2015 Libby Erwood rated it it was ok
Shelves: picture-books
I Am Sacajawea, I Am York: Our Journey West with Louis and Clark was not one of my favorite picture books I have read so far this semester. I did not think that it was very interesting and it did not hold my attention well. Although the story was written to inform the students, this was still meant for young children so the writing style and content should have been more engaging. One positive to the book was the pictures were very well done. They were colorful and provided a good insight into w ...more
Amy
This is a very nicely done book about the Lewis and Clark expedition as told from the point of view of Sacajawea and York. My niece is studying the Lewis and Clark expedition in summer camp, and although she had heard of Sacajewa, she had not heard of York. I chose to read this book to her as a way of illustrating to her the contributions of other figures taking part in this expedtion, and as a way of illustrating to her that the Lewis and Clark journey did not just involve white people. Credit ...more
Chris Young
Jun 17, 2014 Chris Young rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Telling the story of Lewis and Clark's expedition from the point of view of Sacajawea and York, Clark's slave, this version of events keeps it way real. Sacajawea and Clark are controlled by white men who need them and yet do not consider them equals. Sacajawea and York grumble, they commiserate, they acknowledge each other's talents, and they do what they have to do to survive. This book shows that some of the greatest achievements in U.S. history were built on the backs of slaves and the oppre ...more
Logan
The story of explorers Lewis and Clark, told alternately by guide Sacajawea and Charbonneau's black slave York (whom I'd never even heard of). I was surprised at how well this help Logan's attention. This was his first exposure to the story of L & C and I'm glad it included these key, but lesser known participants. There was a nice afterword too, about what happened to York & Sacajawea. While I think the text alone might not have kept his attention, the beautiful action-filled illustrati ...more
h
Jun 06, 2009 h rated it liked it
Shelves: kidslit
A nice picture book with clear text telling the story of the Lewis and Clark expedition through the eyes of Sacajawea and York, enslaved people who played important roles in the expedition.
Mslogar
Apr 03, 2012 Mslogar rated it really liked it
simply told from the viewpoint of a slave and Sacajawea-- beautiful illustrations
April
M liked it...especially the different ways to pronounce SACAJAWEA! :)
Lincoln Arias
Aug 14, 2012 Lincoln Arias rated it liked it
It was good
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Claire Rudolf Murphy has loved history since she was a young girl; in fact she majored in it at Santa Clara University. Murphy is the author of fourteen books for children. A former middle and high school teacher, she is a member of the faculty of Hamline University's Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults. She lives in Washington.
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