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Doctor Who: The Myth Makers (Doctor Who Library (Target) #97)

3.62  ·  Rating Details ·  225 Ratings  ·  27 Reviews
Whent the Tardis lands in Asia Minor, not far from the city of Troy, the Doctor is introduced to Agamemnon and Odysseus and is forced to admit his less than God-like status. He is then given just two days to come up with a plan for beating the Trojans.
Paperback, 144 pages
Published September 12th 1985 by Dr Who (first published April 1985)
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Shane Mackenzie
Feb 23, 2011 Shane Mackenzie rated it it was amazing
Some may reject Doctor Who as comedy, but to those critics I remind them that Doctor Who has never shied away from ANY genre. In their fearlessness to touch on anything and everything... they have never failed to commit to the genre they are testing. In this earnest effort, I am always willing to travel with the whims of the different authors who have written for Doctor Who. Donald Cotton, here, did a conceptual story that was successfully interesting, thematic and FUNNY. All told from the ...more
rabbitprincess
Feb 23, 2010 rabbitprincess rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Doctor Who fans, those with an interest in the Trojan War
Shelves: doctor-who, pilfered, 2010
A thoroughly silly First Doctor adventure, one of his "history" stories. This time he materializes on the plains outside of Troy and contributes in a minor way to the death of Hector at the hand of god-fearing Achilles, who is convinced that the Doctor is Zeus. Gotta love stories of mistaken identity and circumstances where the Doctor turns out to have played a part in making history (or myth, in the case of The Iliad).

The story actually differs significantly from the episode of the show as it a
...more
Sarah Sammis
Jul 27, 2011 Sarah Sammis rated it really liked it
Shelves: pc, read-in-2006
It takes place during the Trojan war with the first doctor and his two companions. I guess it falls under the "historical and educational" bit of Doctor Who and not the "bug eyed monster" bit. The book is fortunately very short. It started out fun but it quickly started to drag with a narrator who was supposedly Homer but didn't sound anything like Homer the poet. He might have been Homer Simpson, if Homer were British.


The first doctor and his companions Vicki and Steven end up in the middle of
...more
Christian Petrie
Jul 07, 2012 Christian Petrie rated it did not like it
During the course of rereading the Doctor Who books I own, this is the first one that I felt like skipping after starting it. First off, I am not a fan of the first person narrative. So when I encounter a book written in the first person, I do become hesitant.

With this book, it was bad. I do give Donald Cotton credit for trying something. In my opinion, though, it does not work. He has Homer as the narrator. This leads to Homer talking more about other things then the Doctor, his opinion on thin
...more
Nina
Jun 13, 2015 Nina rated it it was amazing
If I had a reliable time machine and could go back and save all the missing episodes of Doctor Who before the vandals at the BBC wiped the tapes, "The Myth Makers" is one of the first stories I would grab. It is smart, it is funny, and it is outrageous. It is also, of course, ultimately tragic, as any tale about the Trojan War should be.

Donald Cotton's novelization of his script is probably the best way to experience this story unless and until the film canisters are found gathering dust in a f
...more
Angelya (Tea in the Treetops)
The great story of the Trojan war, as told by Homer himself. He put most of the interesting stuff down to Zeus and the Olympians, but of course, it was all the first Doctor, Vicki and Steven.

The story is told in a rather quirky way with Homer narrating. He speaks with a few strange "modern" phrases which made me think he must have gone travelling with the Doctor himself at some stage, but there's no indication of that by the end of the story. The thing that really bothered me about this story, t
...more
Nicholas Whyte
http://nhw.livejournal.com/1026018.html?#cutid1[return][return]Once again, Cotton produces a memorable Who novel through a first person narrative: this time he has the poet Homer telling the story of how he witnessed the Doctor and friends interfering with the outcome of the siege of Troy. Homer didn't appear at all in the story as broadcast (though Cotton has him absorb the silent role of the Cyclops played by Tutte Lemkow); constricting the whole narrative to a single viewpoint character does ...more
Min
May 12, 2016 Min rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is my absolute favorite thus far. The narrator joyfully gives distinctive English accents to the characters. Odysseus is the rough 'pirate', Paris is the effete upper class, and Homer is laid back observer (the story's narrator) blends anachronisms joyfully making it a science historical fiction.

It is much more about a re-telling of the battle of Troy from the Iliad with most of the action being in the exposition of Homer. The joyful jaunt of language that he uses honestly, made me forget
...more
Andy Simmons
May 13, 2015 Andy Simmons rated it really liked it

Another fine Doctor Who novelisation from Donald Cotton. In this story, he narrates the story of the fall of Troy and the Doctor's involvement; from the perspective of Homer. I have not seen the original TV show so I cannot say how accurate the story is (to the show, not to history), but it is an enjoyable read. The character of Homer, although anachronistic, is engaging. The story is written fully tongue-in-cheek with a healthy dash of humour. This story, though, doesn't have the Whitehall fast
...more
Andy Simmons
May 11, 2015 Andy Simmons rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

Another fine Doctor Who novelisation from Donald Cotton. In this story, he narrates the story of the fall of Troy and the Doctor's involvement; from the perspective of Homer. I have not seen the original TV show so I cannot say how accurate the story is (to the show, not to history), but it is an enjoyable read. The character of Homer, although anachronistic, is engaging. The story is written fully tongue-in-cheek with a healthy dash of humour. This story, though, doesn't have the Whitehall fast
...more
Sean LeBeau
Jul 11, 2014 Sean LeBeau rated it it was amazing
Shelves: doctor-who
Perhaps the best Doctor Who novelization. It's a humorous account of the last few days of the Trojan War, told from an anachronistic Homer's eyewitness (pun intended) point of view. Slightly as if Douglas Adams had written for the First Doctor. Great humorous characterizations of Odysseus, Paris, and Achilles. And, of course, who really came up with the idea for the Horse. This is the first novelization I had ever tried reading when I was a kid. Didn't get far with it then, but appreciate the ...more
Travis
Dec 21, 2008 Travis rated it liked it
Shelves: doctor-who
The Tardis crew gets mixed up in the Trojan War. The Doctor gets mistaken for Zeus and ends up being the one that comes up with the idea for the Trojan Horse.
Meanwhile, Vikki falls in love and Stephen ends up with a Greek Slave girl.

Vikki's leaving is nicely done and I always thought Katrina, the slave girl was a good companion that I wished had stuck around longer.

The Greeks and Trojans come across as a bunch of knuckleheads. The author tries too hard to be funny, so the story isn't one of the
...more
stormhawk
Mar 19, 2011 stormhawk rated it did not like it
Another first person account of an encounter with The Doctor, this one supposedly penned by Homer. The Greek one, not the cartoon guy.

Could have been better, but the author chose to splatter (not merely sprinkle) the text with anachronisms that don't make sense even IF The Doctor dropped by to visit Homer more than once as is implied.

Probably better as a teleplay.
Leah
Mar 01, 2014 Leah rated it really liked it
I rather enjoyed this Doctor Who book. It was based on one of the first Doctor's serials of the same name. I don't know if the serial was this way but the book is from the perspective of Homer, as if he is observing the whole thing and getting mixed up in it a little, too. It was an interesting way to write it. I thought it was well written and funny.
Daniel Kukwa
Jan 30, 2013 Daniel Kukwa rated it it was amazing
Shelves: doctor-who
One of the most experimental of Target novelizations, it's an excuse for Donald Cotton to go to town on his Harntell-era Doctor Who script...and come up with something even more entertaining, hilarious, and poignant than the original!
Paul Garner
Apr 20, 2015 Paul Garner rated it really liked it
Shelves: dr-who
Certainly one of the outstanding contributions to the Target Doctor Who range. Intelligently written and humorous, replete with witty badinage and drollery. Gems of dialogue and prose on virtually every page. If you enjoy Douglas Adams you'll like this too. Highly recommended.
Mahfey
Dec 07, 2013 Mahfey rated it it was amazing
This is a truly funny book, written from the viewpoint of a dry and witty Homer (not the yellow one).

If you are reading in continuity order this comes directly after the Time Meddler not two books after.
Steven
Aug 20, 2013 Steven rated it really liked it
Extremely humorous (maybe a little much, in places), with "Homer" retelling the story using anachronistic phrases, but an entertaining read nonetheless. I kind of feel cheated by the ending, as the narrator is left out of many events, so the narrative drops off rather abruptly.
Kristina
Jun 15, 2016 Kristina rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: doctor-who, audio
A wonderful combination of history and myth. The characters from the Trojan War are brought realistically to life and the Doctor and companions are woven seamlessly into the tale almost in place of the Gods. A fascinating retelling of a classic tale.
Steve
May 13, 2009 Steve rated it liked it
A decent read. I liked the narration in it (from Homer's point of view) much better than the narrative device in The Romans, Donald Cotton's other adaptation of one of his historicals, which was trying too hard to be funny all the way through.
Iain Hamilton
Apr 30, 2013 Iain Hamilton rated it really liked it
Bit of a weird one, but doesn't deserve some of the bad reviews it gets. Cotton, as always, is playing it for laughs and that's what it gets.
Michael
Michael rated it it was ok
Mar 04, 2012
Amy
Amy rated it liked it
Jun 19, 2014
Ollie Hawkins
Ollie Hawkins rated it liked it
Aug 02, 2016
Vijai Jayaram
Vijai Jayaram rated it really liked it
Apr 30, 2013
Geoff Schuelke
Geoff Schuelke rated it really liked it
Oct 04, 2013
Jennifer
Jennifer rated it really liked it
Nov 08, 2015
Philip
Philip rated it it was amazing
Apr 04, 2014
Sacherina
Sacherina rated it really liked it
Aug 04, 2012
John Stonecipher
John Stonecipher rated it liked it
Sep 13, 2014
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