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The Science of Mechanics: A Critical and Historical Account of Its Development
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The Science of Mechanics: A Critical and Historical Account of Its Development

4.45 of 5 stars 4.45  ·  rating details  ·  11 ratings  ·  1 review
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Published December 1st 1988 by Open Court Publishing Company
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Douglas
Ok physics buffs! This is a hard book, kinda like physics bootcamp. But you'll be better for it--especially the young 'uns. I slugged it out with it under professorial supervision when I was an undergraduate over 30 years ago. Not that I was all that good a physics student, doing well on examinations and churning out reams of completed problem sets. Frankly, that was quite boring and I wonder that anyone could really love physics after several years of such drudgery. Perhaps that is why American ...more
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363713
Ernst Mach was an Austrian physicist and philosopher and is the namesake for the "Mach number" (also known as Mach speed) and the optical illusion known as Mach bands.
More about Ernst Mach...
Space and Geometry: In the Light of Physiological, Psychological and Physical Inquiry Analysis of Sensations Knowledge and Error: Sketches on the Psychology of Enquiry The Principles of Physical Optics: An Historical and Philosophical Treatment Popular Scientific Lectures

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“But we must not forget that all things in the world are connected with one another and depend on one another, and that we ourselves and all our thoughts are also a part of nature. It is utterly beyond our power to measure the changes of things by time. Quite the contrary, time is an abstraction, at which we arrive by means of the change of things; made because we are not restricted to any one definite measure, all being interconnected. A motion is termed uniform in which equal increments of space described correspond to equal increments of space described by some motion with which we form a comparison, as the rotation of the earth. A motion may, with respect to another motion, be uniform. But the question whether a motion is in itself uniform, is senseless. With just as little justice, also, may we speak of an “absolute time” --- of a time independent of change. This absolute time can be measured by comparison with no motion; it has therefore neither a practical nor a scientific value; and no one is justified in saying that he knows aught about it. It is an idle metaphysical conception.” 6 likes
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