The Marching Dead
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The Marching Dead (Marius don Hellespont #2)

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3.68 of 5 stars 3.68  ·  rating details  ·  50 ratings  ·  20 reviews
Find the dead a King, save himself, win the love of his life, live happily ever after. No wonder Marius dos Helles is bored. But now something has stopped the dead from, well, dying.

It’s up to Marius, Gerd, and Gerd’s not-dead-enough Granny to journey across the continent and put the dead back in the afterlife where they belong.

File Under:Fantasy[ Dead Reckoning | Strange...more
Paperback, 411 pages
Published March 26th 2013 by Angry Robot (first published January 1st 2013)
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Dan Schwent
When Marius don Hellespont finds himself dead for a second time and his girlfriend missing, he goes out into the world seeking answers. It seems Scorbus, the king of the dead he helped crown, is bent on waging war against the living. Can Marius find Keth and stop the king he put into power?

At the end of the Corpse Rat King, I was hoping I'd read about Marius again. Lee Battersby must have heard my prayers, as he has served up another adventure of that loveable miscreant.

The Marching Dead picks u...more
sj
The King is dead. Long live the motherfucking King.

Oh, Lee Battersby. You sure showed me, huh? When I said I enjoyed but didn't love The Corpse-Rat King last August, it's like you took it as a PERSONAL CHALLENGE and decided to write a book you knew I would LOOOOOVE.

What? That's not what happened? Oh. Hm.

Well, anyway.

For the rest of you - if you're too lazy to click that link up there, The Corpse-Rat King was the first of Battersby's Marius don Hellespont novels, in which a downright scoundrel i...more
Bob Milne
It was almost a year ago that Lee Battersby completely blew me away with The Corpse-Rat King, an extremely funny, extraordinarily imaginative tale that I thoroughly enjoyed, and have gleefully recommended over and over again. I've been waiting for the follow-up almost from the moment I turned the last page, and I'm pleased to say The Marching Dead was definitely worth the wait.

In a slightly more mature sequel, Battersby eases up a bit on the slapstick and reigns in the bizarre sense of adventure...more
Kate Sherrod
had a lot of love last fall for the first novel in this series, The Corpse-Rat King. So much love I almost gave it five stars. Really, the only reason I didn't was because I was pretty sure the best was yet to come.

And I was right. With this sequel, The Marching Dead, Battersby kicked up everything I loved about the first novel by a notch or two -- world-building, storytelling, hilarity, and most of all, characters who just made me punch the air over and over again, usually while laughing. Gerd...more
Andrew
The previous book was comedy -- well-graced with serious notes, and with plenty of drama in the antics, but a comedy. This book stands on that build-up to hand you a serious story (with plenty of laugh lines).

Our buddy Marius ("hero" would be too strong a word) has come home, made up with his pissed-off old flame, and settled down to an honest life with the woman he loves. Of course he is bored crapless. Fortunately, in some sense, the dead rise up and drag the woman he loves away into the under...more
Tim Martin
Ah Marius don Hellespont, you thought you had retired. You got the girl. You saved the world. You got the lovely cottage out in the country with the white picket fence, surrounded by flowers, complete with the requisite cat. Well, that was maybe more her dream (especially the cat part), but Marius wanted to make her happy, so if she is happy, he is happy.

Two things though. One, Marius is bored, bored, bored. And two, wishing for a little excitement, Marius very much learns the meaning of the sa...more
Tabitha (Pabkins)
The Walking Dead ain't got nothing on The Marching Dead! If you like your fantasy, foul mouthed, not dirty but filthy fun then you definitely want to pick up the books by Lee Battersby featuring Marius don Hellespont. The first book The Corpse-Rat King was an exciting ride of hilarity that constantly left me wondering what the hell could this guy possibly come up with next?

Lee Battersby gives us - "THESE ARE THE RULES!" - A conversational essay from Marius' perspective.

He tops it in this sequel,...more
Mieneke
Last year Lee Battersby's The Corpse-Rat King was one of the first books to come out of Angry Robot's first Open Door month and I was excited to see what could come out of such a process. While I did have some problems with the book – difficulties connecting to the main character and some pacing issues – I quite enjoyed the story and I was left wanting to discover how Battersby would finish Marius' story. In The Marching Dead I found a great return to this story. I liked that we return to a Mar...more
Ross Evans
Imagine a zombie Jack Sparrow trapped in Wonderland, with the wits of Locke Lamora and the vulgar mouth of a dirty sailor. You might get an idea of Marius Don Hellespont. The Marching Dead is the sequel to 2012’s excellent The Corpse Rat King by Aussie-Author Lee Battersby. While I didn’t post my thoughts on The Corpse Rat King here on the blog I will quickly note that I was thoroughly impressed and became an instant fan of Mr. Battersby.

The sequel picks up after the events of The Corpse Rat Ki...more
Peter
I picked this book up at a sale, not knowing it was the second book in a series. As some of the reviews suggested it could be read independently, I decided to give it a go.

Will I seek out the first book in the series after readin this one? Well, no.

There's several reasons. The world in the Marching Dead just doesn't feel real. It just feels like a string of backdrops for Marius's adventures, which also seem to lack in direction. For the first half of the book I had no idea why Marius went to the...more
The Speculative Post
I’m a big lover of grey areas. Fantasy has lately been oscillating between Lord of the Rings style stalwart heroes, and Grimdark nearly villainous anti-heros, so it was really a great find for me to pick up Lee Battersby whose protagonist Marius is quickly climbing the ranks of my favourite fantasy characters. He’s not a -bad- guy per se, but he knows which side his bread is buttered on: the side that he gets to eat and you don’t. He may save the day, but he probably does it either against his b...more
Zach Sparks
I liked the second book marginally less than the first one. It had everything I liked about the 1st one but right at the very end it got very preachy about the evils of religion and I couldn't tell if it was necessary to the way the universe in the book was constructed or if it was the actual opinion of the author. The same thing happened on my first read through of The Golden Compass; I enjoyed it right until it got really preachy. I don't mind religion in fiction or anti-religious sentiments e...more
Mick
It's been four years since the events of The Corpse-Rat King and Marius von Hellespont, conman, scoundrel, and one-time King of the Dead, has finally stopped running. Now he's living in the countryside with the love of his life, Keth, looking after their cat and making a (mostly) honest living.

It all comes crashing down when Keth is taken from him to the land of the dead, and he finds himself with a sword through his chest. It seems the King of the dead, who Marius crowned four years ago, has b...more
prk
Marius don Hellespont is dead bored. Literally. Despite being life-challenged he won the heart of the girl he loved and retired to the country with her, where with nary a shady scheme in sight, he's bored out of his considerable wits.

Then the dead stop dying, his love gets kidnapped, and as Marius chases after her, he finds himself in a player in a much bigger game - a war between the dead and the living. Unsatisfied with being King of the Dead below, Scorbus wants to eradicate all the living an...more
Jo
Mar 03, 2014 Jo rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2014
Loved it. Very sharp witted and fun.
Katharine
Katharine is a judge for the Aurealis Awards. This review is the personal opinion of Katharine herself, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of any judging panel, the judging coordinator or the Aurealis Awards management team.
David Marshall
Its quite good but nothing but a pale shadow of The Corpse-Rat King which was one of the standout fantasies of 2012.

http://opionator.wordpress.com/2013/0...
Tom Reed
the 2nd in a series.
sadly, whilst having a bit more plot than the first, and having some interesting moments, there just wasn't much to it. there were also several editing errors.
Dawn Paris
I like this one even more than its predecessor. Marius is a great flawed and reluctant hero.
G.N.
Loved it.
Even better than the first book, which I also loved.
Laurielle Laurielle
Laurielle Laurielle marked it as to-read
Aug 26, 2014
BookBloke
BookBloke marked it as to-read
Aug 24, 2014
Leah
Leah marked it as to-read
Aug 16, 2014
William Tallmon
William Tallmon marked it as to-read
Aug 14, 2014
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Scott Mccoy marked it as to-read
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Lee Battersby is the multiple-award winning author of the novels 'The Corpse-Rat King' and 'Marching Dead' (Angry Robot, 2012, 2013) as well as the upcoming children's novel 'Magit and Bugrat' (Walker Books, 2015) and over 70 short stories, many of which are collected in 'Through Soft Air' (Prime Books 2006). He has appeared in markets as diverse as Year's Best Fantasy & Horror Volume 20; Year...more
More about Lee Battersby...
The Corpse-Rat King Alchymical Romance Midnight Echo #4 Through Soft Air The Canals of Aguilar / Legacy (RAF Volume 5: Issue 5)

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