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Silvrets rike (Erövraren, #4)
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Silvrets rike (Conqueror #4)

4.25 of 5 stars 4.25  ·  rating details  ·  4,698 ratings  ·  219 reviews
Ny del i succéserien om Djingis khan

Djingis khan är död, men legenden om honom och det han skapat lever vidare. Hans arméer har samlats i Karakorum för att svära trohet till hans son och arvinge Ogotai. Men striden om tronen i silvrets rike är inte avgjord. Ett inbördeskrig är på väg att bryta ut, Ogotais bror Chagatai försöker ta makten genom en kupp. Och Ogotai måste fat...more
Paperback, 394 pages
Published January 9th 2012 by Bonnier Pocket (first published September 2nd 2010)
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Rabindranauth
My least favorite novel from Conn Iggulden. And it’s still an easy 4 star read.

Genghis Khan is dead, and the Mongolian nation mourns. His son Ogedai is now Khan, and he has done what no Mongolian leader has done before; he has built a home. Not just any home, but a capital for the vast Mongolian Empire. He may be Khan, but before he can rule, he has to defeat his brothers and prove he has the strength to be Khan. As the civil war threatens to tear the Khanate apart, the brilliant general Tsuboda...more
David Sven
Genghis Khan is dead. His son Ogedai becomes khan, but not without incident. There's a lot more political intrigue this book than the previous three. Genghis built an Empire and remained virtually unchallenged as khan by virtue of the fact there was no one with the same force of will and personality to oppose his absolute hold on the Mongol tribes. Now that he's gone, who gets to be khan is not so clear cut.

While Ogedai builds a Mongol capital from the ground up, establishing a centre for Empir...more
Kevin
Terrific. Simply. This is my all time fav book series. Easily. (well, maybe the Boxcar Children was close). Conn Iggulden continues to write great historical fiction with this Khan series. Is it all historically correct? I don't know. Is it geographically correct? I don't know. Is it a great story filled with great characters? Definitely. I was super excited when I saw this book at our library and it was one of those books you read slowly because you don't want to finish. Surely there is another...more
Lance Greenfield
If I had read this book as a standalone, without its three predecessors, I think that I may have awarded it five stars. It really is a wonderful work of historical fiction. However, it is just not up to the standard of the other three in this series.

There is quite a lot of politics in this one, and the rivalries between the secions of the family continue. There is a fair share of savage brutality, and some of it is shocking, but you expect that by now, don't you?

Ogedai is the new Khan, but only...more
Andrew
I like a bit of equestrian and archery action - especially, it turns out, when it involves the smelly, rapacious, bandy-legged, furry-hatted Mongols. I've savoured every sword slash and pike thrust of Conn Iggulden's romp through Central Asia in the 'Conqueror' series. In 'Wolves of the Plain', there's the desperation of Genghis Khan's early years: the fractious tribal politics that resulted in his father being killed and his family left for dead; his mother who could never forgive him for the f...more
Eugene Boytsov
Very good book, though I tend to assess such historical novels through the prism of the History of Russia, where the name of Batu-khan (pronounced Batyi) is remembered to this day as a synonym of total and irreparable disaster (Russia spent 300 years under the Tartar-Mongol yoke), and I always compare such books with Vassily Yan who wrote a fascinating trilogy about the Mongol invasion (published in 1942!). Conn Iggulden largely omits the campaign in Russia and Ukraine, but what the heck! It is...more
Terri
While not the best of the series I still enjoyed Empire of Silver, the fourth in this epic saga on the Mongolian Empire. Put it this way, not as good as the first two, but better BY FAR than the third, Bones of The Hills.

And I learned something, which is always good. I did know much of Ogedai Khan. He was a son of Ghengis Khan and this book covers his reign. His story is quite interesting. There are events that took place during his reign that truly did shape the world, such as, the invasion of...more
Faith Justice
From the Synopsis:

“Genghis Khan is dead, but his legend and his legacy live on. His son Ogedai has built a white city on a great plain and made a capital for the new nation. Now the armies have gathered to see which of Genghis’ sons has the strength to be khan. The Mongol empire has been at peace for two years, but whoever survives will face the formidable might of their great enemy, China’s Song dynasty.”

Conn Iggulden (author of the Emperor series on the life of Julius Caesar) brings us the fou...more
Olethros
-Novelando cómo se va acercando a su cénit el Imperio Mongol.-

Género. Novela Histórica.

Lo que nos cuenta. Ogedai ha visto cómo la ciudad de Karakorum se construía a partir de la nada en medio de la estepa con las riquezas conseguidas en las diferentes conquistas mongolas, pero tanto su salud como los movimientos políticos de otros mongoles, algunos de su propia familia y con derechos teóricos a dirigir a los suyos, hacen que el khan no sepa cuánto tiempo más va a vivir. Los Chin y los Sung no es...more
Tony Taylor
A very interesting and well written historical novel. I had previously read an historical account about the Genghis Khan and his armies of Mongols "Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World"), but here the author took as many facts as his research could garner and put together a great tale of intrigue and fierce battles as the armies of the Khan swept across Asia and Eastern Europe. To the author's credit, he closes with a chapter of historical notes giving the reader an insight as to how...more
Teresa
Would I have bothered to start reading this book if I had realised it was book 4 of a series? Probably not and that would have been my loss. Reading the other books in the series would have helped me with understanding the characters and their relationship with each other but careful reading solved that problem. It would have been interesting to know how everybody had reached their current state and the price paid for success or failure but while I will go back and read those other novels at som...more
أحمد
الجزء الرابع من قصة الامبراطورية المغولية
بعد وفاة جنكيز خان و تولي اوجيداي الحكم و الصراع علي السلطة و القفزة العسكرية الهائلة لاحتلال موسكو و كييف و الانتصار علي النمسا و بولندا
ممتع جدا رواية مليئة بالتفاصيل و المؤلف موهوب جدا و خاصه حفاظه علي سياق كل شخصية بشكل متماسك طول احداث الرواية


قمت بالبدء في قراءة تلك الرواية كنوع من التغيير و البعد عن القراءات السياسية وخلال هذه الرواية وجدت نفسي في مفترق الطرق السياسي لاوروبا و المنطقة العربية و الصين في فترة تاريخية نادرة اقتربت فيها تلك الحضارات لح...more
Jeffrey Crimmel
I finished Khan; Empire of Silver on Nov. 15. I was sent this book as a free copy in a drawing. There are several more in the series and I now feel I must get to them as well. The book comes out to the public in December and I am not suppose to write any reviews until then. All I will say is if you like Historical Fiction and you think you would have wanted to live during this era, think again. The book is an incredible account of certain battles, struggles for power, and a detailed account of w...more
Ian
I pre-ordered this book and had finished it by the evening of the day after I received it. I enjoyed the author's earlier books about Julius Caesar and Genghis Khan and will pre-order his next title based on the strength of those novels, all of which would be at least 4* and some definitely rating 5*.

However I don't rate this book nearly as highly - primarily due to its length. Although 428 pages long, the text is large and it is not a long book. This is made worse by the fact that the book span...more
Jennifer (JC-S)
‘All men had a price, but it was almost never gold.’

In 1229, Genghis Khan is dead, and his son Ogedai has been named his successor as the Great Khan. Ogedai is Genghis’s third son. The night before Ogedai is due to be confirmed as Genghis’s successor, troops loyal to his elder brother Chagatai storm Ogedai’s palace at Karakorum and attempt to murder him. This attempt fails and once Ogedai is confirmed, he sends his brother to conquer the south. Tsubodai, Genghis Khan’s great general, is sent wes...more
Clare Cannon
This is not the type of book I usually review, but the first in this series wasn't too bad and I need more action/adventure/historical recommendations (please send some if you have any!).

A disclaimer: Khan is gritty, quite bloody, teeming with political and physical warfare, fierce rivalry, pagan customs and the great but ruthless process of making a Mongol empire. Yet the story of each character is very human, which brings the historical portrait of this people to life.

What impressed me the mos...more
Hassan Nasser
بعد موت جنكيز خان تستعرّ نار المنافسة على قيادة المغول بين أبنائه الثلاثة وأحفاده الأربعة. وبعد تنصيب ابنه أوجيدي خاناً، يضحّي أحد إخوته بنفسه، بينما يُبعَدُ الآخر ليحكم مملكة بعيدة، في حين يشرع الأحفاد الأربعة بالتخطيط لمؤامرة تدفعهم طموحاتهم إليها.
وبينما الخان منشغلٌ في بناء مدينة كاراكوروم، كانت النيران تلتهم فرسانه بفعل بارود مدفعية جيش أعدائهم الصينيين في الشرق. أما في الغرب، فإن جيش المغول تحت قيادة تسوبودي أفضل رجال جنكيز خان، استطاع سحق الروس والبولنديين عبر عدة غزوات متتالية. وبينما عص...more
Linda
I finished the re-read. This is the fourth book in the series and is excellent. I had some trouble in Chapter 19 and am not satisfied yet as to what happened to the Grand Duke. Google and Wikipedia searches were of no help. I will run into the questions I have in another book by another author and find the answers to my questions. That gives me something to look forward to. Tsubodai's (sp) confessions to the Russian girl who did not understand his language was poignant. The historical notes were...more
Shirley
Khan, Empire of Silver is a well-written historical novel. Conn Iggulden writes with the knowledge of an historian and the objectivity of a journalist. He neither extols nor demeans the conquering warriors. Skills as a novelist allow him to vividly portray events as they unfold.

The novel focuses on the conquests of Genhis Khan’s third son Ogodie. Also, quests for power lead to alliances and conflicts between the descendents of the khans. Sorkhaqtani, Ogodie’s sister-in-law, is a strong force who...more
Mohamad Dahrouj
امبراطورية الفضة انه الكتاب الرابع من من سيرة القائد المغولي جنكيز خان لكنه هذا الجزء يتحدث عن امبراطورية المغول بعد جنكيز خان حيث استعرت المنافسة على خلافة جنكيز بين ابناءه وخاصة اوجيدي الذي اصبح خانا بفعل وصية جنكيز وليس بسبب امكانياته وقدرراته وبين اخيه تشاغاتي الذي كان يرى انه الأحق بخلافة والده . يشهد هذا الجزء أيضاً بناء اول عاصمة للمغول مدينة كاركوروم ، كما يشهد اول دور بارز للمرأة في هذه الامبراطورية وهي سورهتاني أرملة اخ الخان الذي ضحى بنفسه في سبيل اخيه.
شهد هذا الجزء أيضاً تمدد المغول...more
Carrie Slager
In some ways, I miss the character of Genghis Khan. His presence was keenly felt, even when Conn Iggulden switched to the points of view of secondary characters and he was so wonderfully ruthless. He was a horrible human being, but in fiction, he was most definitely a memorable character. Now that he’s dead and his sons and grandsons take turns backstabbing each other, it’s just not the same. However, there was one thing I really loved about Empire of Silver: Sorhatani.

Sorhatani, the wife of Tol...more
Tom
This has been one of my favorites in the series so far. After Genghis death, the Mongols held onto power in the regions they had conquered for about 100 years. This is the first book after his death, so its a lot more political intrigue amongst his sons, brothers, and grandsons for who is going to end up running the empire. I knew the history, but the story telling here is really well done. The Mongols continue to expand so you also get the good battle stories - win win.
Ronald Concepcion
My fear that this book would only be a shadow of the first three books in the series was soon forgotten. The absence of Genghis did not make the fourth book lifeless. Once again, Conn Igulden proved to be a master at weaving intricate tapestries of characters and vistas. He put me right smack in the middle of the story. It was as if my senses actually experienced what was depicted in it. Bravo!
Jason Born
Had trouble after the death of Genghis in the previous book. But I got used to some of the new characters. The history related remains fascinating.
Tanya
The 4th instalment in the series - good, rollicking tale that sends you off to find an atlas. Need to go find the next one.
Shari
Genghis has died and the second generation khanate is in swing. Ogedai, the third son of Genghis was designated heir to the khanate but Chagatai, second son, wanted it for himself and there is the expected conspiracy which brings Ogedai's usual good sense to the fore. Ogedai goes east again to conquer the Chin; Tsubodai, the masterful general who directed Genghis's armies takes the horde into Russia, across the steppes, as far as Budapest and Krakow, with designs to rush across Europe. Chagatai...more
Vivek
I actually though this was the last book in the series until I saw there is a 5th edition released in 2011. That makes sense, because after reading through this - I felt at loss why the relatively peaceful era of Genghis' grandsons would be missed after all that has been covered in detail by Iggulden.

This book continues on the story of the relatives and major figures in the Mongol army as it gets a new heir and starts their vicious sweep that threatened to wipe of entire Europe from the face of...more
Bonnie
I thought I was through with the Mongols after Genghis Khan died in the third book of this series. I was rather glad to be done since the last two books were rather depressing because of so much death and destruction in the (to my way of thinking) pointless conquest of other lands by the Mongols. I've never been able to understand why some individuals think they need to conquer the world. What kept me going was interesting characters and excellent writing.

When I saw this book I felt I needed to...more
Lolly's Library
With this, the fourth entry in Conn Iggulden's masterful series on Genghis Khan, the story has become even larger than before. Though Iggulden tried to avoid the, as he called it, “Russian novel syndrom” by introducing a new character on every single page, there are still enough new faces to keep things interesting. And even though the occasional character disappears and seems to have been forgotten, don't worry, you won't miss them for long, once you find yourself swept away by the action and d...more
Michele
Superb! I would love the chance to watch the mongols in action (well, not the brutal killing part.) They were apparently the best warriors with unsurpassed battle strategies, discipline, and amazing archery and riding skills. I enjoyed reading about their battle formations and tactics (more than I though I would!) The four books of this series started with Genghis's father and just ended with the last of Genghis's brothers and children dying. I can't wait for his new book, which I think will be...more
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119121
I was born in the normal way in 1971, and vaguely remember half-pennies and sixpences. I have written for as long as I can remember: poetry, short stories and novels. It’s what I always wanted to do and read English at London University with writing in mind. I taught English for seven years and was Head of English at St. Gregory’s RC High School in London by the end of that period. I have enormous...more
More about Conn Iggulden...
Genghis: Birth of an Empire (Conqueror, #1) The Gates of Rome (Emperor, #1) Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, #3) Genghis: Lords of the Bow (Conqueror, #2) The Death of Kings (Emperor, #2)

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