کلیسای جامع و چند داستانِ دیگر
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

کلیسای جامع و چند داستانِ دیگر

4.33 of 5 stars 4.33  ·  rating details  ·  12,703 ratings  ·  585 reviews
It was morning in America when Raymond Carver's Cathedral came out in 1983, but the characters in this dry collection of short stories from the forgotten corners of land of opportunity didn't receive much sunlight. Nothing much happens to the subjects of Carver's fiction, which is precisely why they are so harrowing: nothingness is a daunting presence to overcome. And rare...more
Paperback, 323 pages
Published 2008 by انتشاراتِ نیلوفر (first published 1983)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Paul
Just another genius collection of laconic grimly funny or just grim short stories by Carver, like his other four. My favourites :

“Feathers”. A guy and his wife are invited for dinner at a workmate’s house. Bud and Olla have a peacock and a really ugly baby. (“Even calling it ugly does it credit.”)

“Preservation”. A guy loses his job and his life disintegrates. The fridge breaks down. His wife gets ready to go to an auction to buy a new one. That's all, folks.

“A Small Good Thing”. A boy is hit b...more
Dustin
This book changed my life, sent me on my way to becoming a writer, and quite literally was the reason my girlfriend and I got together. Yeah. Soul mates. Me and Carver.
Fewlas
Avete presente quei libri che si leggono da bambini, mi sembra che li chiamino libri animati, che hanno delle linguette laterali? Tu le tiri e sulla pagina ti si rivela un’immagine, oppure magicamente si alza una figura e la pagina diventa 3D. Spero di essermi spiegata. Comunque, ecco, la sensazione che ho avuto leggendo questo libro di Carver è stata così. Un’esperienza rivelatrice, illuminante.

I critici, parlando dei racconti di Carver, li descrivono come onesti. Sono d’accordo, se con onestà...more
Camille Stein


'Cathedral' - Anne Manteleers - graphic designer + illustrator - http://ow.ly/vtAbV



Los sueños son eso de lo que uno se despierta.

...

La maestría de Raymond Carver proviene de la narración rigurosa e impasible de lo cotidiano; y en lo cotidiano se incluyen a partes iguales lo rutinario y lo terrible, lo lógico y lo absurdo.

Sin aspavientos, sin artificios, con cierto cansancio en la exposición de los hechos, Carver confiere tanto valor a lo que cuenta como a lo que no menciona: las referencias esp...more
Emir Never
There's a scene in Raymond Carver's short story 'Cathedral' that vaguely outlines the workings of great literature.

Here we have a blind visitor guiding his seeing host in drawing a cathedral. As a final touch the blind man asks his host to close his eyes and draw some people. "What's a cathedral without people?" he says.

The blind guides, the seeing follows. We feel this is not impossible, no. It's happening as we read it.

So we kept on with it. His fingers rode my fingers as my hand went over t
...more
J.P.
Sep 28, 2007 J.P. rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: short story writers, short fiction fans
On Christmas Eve, 1989, I sat in my room as snow fell outside. I was 20 years old. That night, I read this book cover-to-cover. I didn't mean to---Carver's voice and characters just grabbed hold of me and wouldn't let go. It's one of the few books I've ever read in one sitting.

These characters, I found, weren't like 'made-up' people from most other fiction I'd read up to that time. They were my friends, neighbors, coworkers---and to some extent, me.

Upon completing Cathedral, I was certain of t...more
AC
On finishing this magnficent collection, I am moved -- Carver is a gem. The final story, in particular, strikes home, since I once spent many hours in College with a guy who was blind as a stone, sitting up late hours, also (as in Cathedral), passing the hooch.... and talking about being blind and seeing and colors and sounds.... what a loss, Carver's early death! Oh, what a loss...

I've now read the three collections -- and the feeling of sadness that there's not another one... just sort of smot...more
Steve
After years of being told that Raymond Carver was the epitome of quality short story writing I finally read one of his books. I'm all in favour of sparse, concise prose that describe the minutiae of everyday life if it offers reveals the extraordinary within the ordinary. With many of the stories in "Cathedral" I kept thinking, "And...?" I did not feel that Carver's subtle observations amounted to any great insight. The only story that lingers in my mind is "A Small, Good Thing" in which a coupl...more
Tanuj Solanki
The name 'Carver' is a fit for the writer's name. He does carve his stories well.

'Chef's House' - his first New Yorker publication - had me reading it repeatedly, amazed at the poise and spareness of the prose, while ever acknowledging the danger of the story careening to a place I didn't want it to. This is the thing with Carver's stories. They create some dread and then they take you to the source of that dread.
PGR Nair
The title Story "cathedral" is one of the best American stories of last century.

The theme is the communication gap that isolates relationships. The narrator drinks too much and seems unable to adequately communicate with his wife. The wife has earlier tried to commit suicide because of loneliness. Both the narrator and his wife are unable to effectively communicate with one another; however, his wife communicates freely and well with the blind man. The narrator is very resistant to getting to kn...more
David
In the title story, the narrator of this typically short, sparely written tale is expecting an old, blind friend of his wife’s to come to visit them for a few days. She hasn’t seen him in ten years, since she worked for him one summer, and she is very excited about it. The friend has recently lost his wife to cancer. His dead wife had been her replacement the following summer, nine years ago, and the job of both women had been to read and talk to him. He’d obviously made a deep impression, as th...more
Gretchen
Cathedral is a collection of short stories by Raymond Carver. Each story explores everyday moments in humanity, as well as common issues like relationships and alcoholism. Carver’s writing style is minimalist, so there are no moments of long description of setting or characters. Carver focuses on plot and themes, and each story ends with a slight cliffhanger, leaving it up to the reader to decide what happens.

I read this book for my Contemporary American Literature class, and I loved it. All the...more
pierlapo  kirby
E così è questo il minimalismo à la Carver?
M'aspettavo molto di più (anche se aspettarsi di più da ciò che è minimale per definizione pare proprio un bel paradosso), anzi m'aspettavo che questa scrittura delle piccole cose facesse al caso mio.
Il punto è che anche a voler tacere delle scelte sulle istantanee delle vite che ritrae (che mi hanno lasciato alquanto freddino, tranne in un paio di racconti), non mi convince lo stile di Carver, e non mi convince per la stessa ragione per cui non mi con...more
Casey
Raymond Carver knows what he writes about. All of his characters could either be him or people he knows really well. I’ve never had that feeling before. That sense that the author is in every story he’s writing about. Be it the family that loses their son, our the alcoholic that is trying to dry up, the husband abandoned with two children by a wife that “is going for it”. I always got the sense it was Carver in all these stories. It was his life he was talking about. Of course that’s not the cas...more
Eric Kibler
This is the collection where Carver shakes off the label of "minimalist".

His previous editor, Gordon Lish, was known for paring Carver's stories down to the bone. But in this collection, free from Lish's pencil, he is able to be more expansive. The stories still concern average shmoes living clumsy lives, but now Carver gives himself the space for more incident. More emotional nuance. Not only that, but he's funnier, and he was fairly funny to begin with.

I read a volume of his poems recently. Li...more
Myles
OK, so the craft and the talent of/behind these stories is undoubted, but there was very little about them to love.

They were mostly about endings and people keeping on anyway. Sometimes they had a shred of hope like in the title story or "Where I'm Calling From", but mostly it was about keeping your head down and just accepting the dull current of life.

This is the first time in a long time that I've felt too young to have read something. I can get a bit down and moody on occasion, but the next t...more
Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly
I thought this had missing pages at the end. The ending was abrupt and made me do a double-take (God, this copy was cheap because it is damaged!). A long, hard think after realizing it is complete. A re-read. Think, think, think. What is this? Then: Ah, a paradox! The husband, who is whole, and can see, cannot tell the his blind visitor what he sees; and the blind man, in his perpetual darkness, making the other see things.

This blinded, then unblinded, me.
Kelly
I always feel like I am missing out on something when a book get amazing reviews and I just don't feel it. This book was not bad, but it was not what I was expecting it to be. One or two of the stories stand out for me, mainly because I felt like the characters were really memorable. I just felt like many of the stories just didn't go anywhere.... which, by the way I am okay with, as long as the prose makes up for it. And I am not saying that the prose here was bad, but it was simple and seemed...more
Ryan Werner
After a career of focusing on the bleak exactitude of blue-collar life, Raymond Carver's last collection embraces the hope he and his characters may have always had.

If What We Talk About When We Talk About Love was a collection full of characters in the middle of losing it all, then Cathedral (Vintage, ISBN: 0394712811, 1983) is a collection full of characters trying to get it all back, trying to salvage relationships of all types: marital (“Chef’s House”), paternal (“The Compartment”), and edib...more
sleeps9hours
Depressing short stories about working-class Americans. He’s a decent writer, but spare, and the subject matter is everyday tragedy. Abrupt endings. Seen as a “realist”, but he lives in a banal and cynical kind of reality. ALL of his characters are awful people with huge flaws and petty prejudices. Recommended by a writer friend, maybe more enjoyable if all you want to do is analyze the writing.

From "Feathers"—about a family with an ugly baby and a peacock for a pet.

p. 23 Olla watched Fran with...more
Jeremy Bailey
This is my favorite collection of short stories bar none. I'm even impressed with the the way in which the collection is arranged. The title story comes last, if I remember correctly and it's a perfect bookend and the strongest here. It may be his most famous. My best pal Andy turned me on to Carver a long time ago and if I never learn Aikido like we had contracted to do, he will be winner by default because of this recommendation. Again, if you need your characters actually doing things (chasin...more
Laala Alghata
“My eyes were still closed. I was inside my house. I knew that. But I didn’t feel like I was inside anything.” — Raymond Carver, Cathedral

I’ve heard people say that Carver is boring, or too monotonous. I don’t agree. His writing is beautiful, realistic and sparse. I’ve put off writing this review for so long because I didn’t really know what to say. I love his writing, I love the realism in his characters and the everyday actions that he writes about. I love that not all the stories get a resolu...more
Heather
A few days have passed since I finished Cathedral and the pain it left me with still lingers. Like an innocuous paper cut that stings when you have forgot of the injury entirely. Sometimes I can't stand myself, and sometimes I can't stand others, but I can involve myself with the characters Carver presents to us. They are the people you surround yourself with because you want to be alone, but not lonely. What strikes me most about the stories is the time that they are written usually before or a...more
Marcia Johnston
This collection includes two of my all-time favorite short stories: "Cathedral" and "A Small, Good Thing." The latter is my favorite favorite. For starters, the rhythm of the title evokes another short story that made an impression on me back when I discovered it in my teens, namely, Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place." Carver's ending does bring us to a clean, well-lighted place. His ending is all the more powerful for its contrast with Hemingway's "nada us not into nada but deliver us fr...more
Jigar Brahmbhatt
Brilliant, Brutal, Devastating - these short stories by the preeminent artist of dirty realism manage to chip away the universals other writers deem necessary and lay bare the particulars, the mundane, the absurd in everyday life. Carver must have had a craggy, unsentimental stare, coz he is always bloody right on target.
Xavier
Carver es un boxeador de los cuentos e intenta ganarte por knock out en cada uno de ellos, a veces le resulta y te quedas perplejo en otras sientes que los golpes te han aturdido y no puedes continuar normalmente. En todo caso todos sus cuentos son formidables combates.
Settareh
سه ستاره امتیاز بدی نیست و به این معنی هم نیست که کتاب بدی بوده یا خوب نبوده، معنیش دقیقا همون چیزیه که میگه :
i liked it.
و حتی به این معنی که باز هم از کارور خواهم خواند و نویسنده خوبی هم هست؛ صرفا فکر میکنم توی استفاده از صفت ها نباید اغراق کرد.
Daniel Clausen
As I was reading the short story Cathedral for the first time, it didn't even occur to me that this could be a story about religion. This seems silly, after all, the story's name is Cathedral. The first time I read it though, I couldn't help but get hung up on the most noticeable parts from the beginning.

Obviously, the main character (who I don't think is ever named) is jealous of the blind man and his relationship with his wife and believes that their relationship is the reason that she might...more
Ema
I can't say that I loved all the stories in this volume, but I was certainly hooked by more than half of them. Most of the stories seem to have a hidden meaning that I could not grasp, so I continued to read more on the net. I'm glad I did, because I found out a bunch of interesting facts about Raymond Carver's life and his stories, which made me better understand his themes and his writing.

He is regarded as "minimalist", being influenced in this respect by his editor Gordon Lish, who would oft...more
globulon
On the whole I liked this collection better than "What we talk about...". I see myself reading both collections again I just felt there was more humanity in this collection.

The real experience here was the story "A Small, Good Thing". This seems to be one of the examples of story restored to pre-Lish editing. This story is titled "The Bath" in "What we talk..." The two versions are drastically different. To start with in "Cathedral" it is 30 pages, in "What.." it is 10. Needless to say, there's...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Questions on the Ending of Raymond Carver's Cathedral 2 13 Mar 12, 2014 04:23PM  
  • Rock Springs
  • Shiloh and Other Stories
  • The Stories of Breece D'J Pancake
  • The Collected Stories
  • Airships
  • Stories in an Almost Classical Mode
  • In the Garden of the North American Martyrs
  • Believers: A novella and stories
  • Persian Nights
  • Selected Stories
  • Jesus' Son
  • The Stories of John Cheever
  • The Pugilist at Rest
  • The Point and Other Stories
  • Whites
  • I Sailed with Magellan
  • Sixty Stories
  • Escapes
7363
Carver was born into a poverty-stricken family at the tail-end of the Depression. The son of a violent alcoholic, he married at 19, started a series of menial jobs and his own career of 'full-time drinking as a serious pursuit'. A career that would eventually kill him. Constantly struggling to support his wife and family Carver enrolled in a writing programme under author John Gardner in 1958 and...more
More about Raymond Carver...
What We Talk About When We Talk About Love Where I'm Calling From: New and Selected Stories Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? Short Cuts: Selected Stories Fires: Essays, Poems, Stories

Share This Book

“Dreams, you know, are what you wake up from.” 90 likes
“You've got to work with your mistakes until they look intended. Understand?” 85 likes
More quotes…