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The Complete Poems

really liked it 4.0  ·  Rating Details ·  1,311 Ratings  ·  17 Reviews
Andrew Marvell was one of the most interesting and important poets of the seventeenth century. He was also a member of parliament, tutor to a ward of Oliver Cromwell's, a satirist and a friend and colleague of Milton's. Yet, apart from one or two anthology pieces like 'To his Coy Mistress', his final establishment as a major poet has waited on the twentieth century. It was ...more
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Published February 24th 1977 by Penguin Classics (first published 1968)
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Alan
Oct 07, 2014 Alan rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A Marvell is a marvell. I spent several years of my life on this book, and of course his delightful prose satires mostly of clerics, such as his Rehearsal Transpros'd, and I have never regretted a minute of it. The book I wrote on him, This Critical Age: Deliberate Departures from Literary Conventions
in Seventeenth Century English Poetry, was published by the U MI doctorate mill. It's in one German library, at the University where Pope Benedict XVI once taught and administered. I cannot claim he
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Daniel Wright
This is a very thin volume for a 'complete works' type book. I suppose this is what makes Marvell so remarkable, that he was such an accomplished poet with so little apparent effort. And accomplished he is, writing variously in every tone, form and genre of lyric poem he knew about, while having his own distinct voice. This book is truly (ahem) marvellous.
Rachel
Nov 03, 2012 Rachel added it
I love the poem Eyes and Tears (14 stanzas) among others
1
How wisely Nature did decree,
With the same eyes to weep and see!
That, having viewed the object vain,
We might be ready to complain.....
Kevin
Apr 16, 2011 Kevin rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
The non-stop rhymed couplets were a bit clangy and distracting, especially after spending so long reading Blake's long, unrhymed lines. At least English prosody hadn't reached the dullness, in Marvell's day, that was the age of Pope and Dryden. The pseudo-pastoral stuff wasn't all that interesting, but Marvell is good in his descriptions of nature. I was surprised to find the best of his poems to be a long piece about his friend's house in the country. I almost didn't even read that poem since i ...more
Katherine Simmons
I have read Marvell's work on and off for a while so brought this book based off experience, however I didn't realise the differing styles of poetry. Personally I liked his vague descriptions of his love(s) and his gentle style, I have impression of soneone who is protecting the object of his desire.

His Cromwell work which I hadn't read before is fascinating view into that time and class.

One of the lowest scores for this is from someone who had to study his work for a course, so I feel that tha
...more
Richard Lodge
Feb 26, 2012 Richard Lodge rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Marvell is so poised, so witty, so complete. He uses conceits, for sure, but with emotional control too, so the curious images never seem forced or unnatural. He has style: bounce, flow, energy, elan. All of this is driven by the force of feeling. He hits home.
Andrew
Apr 21, 2010 Andrew rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Marvell's body of work epitomizes the Cavalier poets, and his love poems are some of the best ever written.
Noreen Auterio
Jun 22, 2008 Noreen Auterio rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Had we but world enough, and time...
Helenn
The only reason I am giving this a 2 is because of a few (3 poems) that do not make me want to kill the man. Ok, my point of view is completely bias against him since my teacher is making me analyze them... and I would have probably like the poems if I didn't have to constantly think "what type of poem is it? what is he trying to say? what is his style? Why did he choose that word? what is the meaning behind it? when did he wrote it? what is the pattern?" and my personal favorite: "how do I know ...more
Jordan
Aug 07, 2016 Jordan rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I would not have picked Marvell up, were it not for the fact it features heavily on my university reading list next term. Admittedly, I never much like this era for poetry. I find rhyming couplets distracting and convoluted, doubly so when they're constant, and the pastoral-type poems were to me relentlessly tedious. My interest picked up with the political satire, though, warranting an extra star.
Lucy Clarke
Dec 16, 2014 Lucy Clarke rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
brilliant. absolutely brilliant. fascinating to read through an interdisciplinary lens, too.
Rachel Brand
Oct 13, 2012 Rachel Brand rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: own, poetry, 2012, en4341
Read the following poems for EN4341 Renaissance Sexualities: Rhetoric and the Body 1580-1660:
* The Nymph complaining for the Death of her Faun
* Young Love
* To his Coy Mistress
* The Unfortunate Lover
* The Picture of Little TC in a Prospect of Flowers
* Damon the Mower
* Upon a Eunuch: a Poet

I enjoyed most of these poems, although I didn't really "get" Damon the Mower. Will have to wait until Tuesday's lecture to see if that sheds any more light on it. 4*
Lesliemae
Aug 03, 2013 Lesliemae rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
I've written papers on Marvell, constructed entire proposals based on Marvell, even spoken in conferences about minuscule aspects of him and everytime I read him I feel as though I'm only scratching at the surface. Marvell is a life work.
Tyrran
Nov 29, 2010 Tyrran rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: partially-read
I used this more as a reference guide rather than as a book that I read from page to page.
E
Mar 14, 2010 E rated it it was amazing
Marvel! He is such a Marvel!:)
Jackie
Nov 30, 2008 Jackie rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"To His Coy Mistress"...the best!
nnnnnaaaaa
Jan 27, 2013 nnnnnaaaaa marked it as to-read
Shelves: vn-s-library
The Garden” (c. 1650),
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  • The Complete English Poems
  • The Complete Poems
  • The Complete Poems
  • The Major Works
  • Sir Thomas Wyatt, the Complete Poems
  • The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose
  • The Shorter Poems
  • The Metaphysical Poets
  • Selected Poems
  • Selected Poems and Fragments
  • The Complete Poems
  • Astrophel and Stella
  • Selected Poetry
  • Salve Deus Rex Judæorum
  • Complete Poems and Translations
  • Selected Poems
  • Complete Poems and Selected Letters
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Andrew Marvell was an English metaphysical poet, Parliamentarian, and the son of a Church of England clergyman (also named Andrew Marvell). As a metaphysical poet, he is associated with John Donne and George Herbert. He was a colleague and friend of John Milton.

Marvell was born in Winestead-in-Holderness, East Riding of Yorkshire, near the city of Kingston upon Hull. The family moved to Hull when
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To His Coy Mistress

Had we but world enough and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down, and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love’s day.
Thou by the Indian Ganges’ side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the flood,
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires and more slow;
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.

But at my back I always hear
Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found;
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long-preserved virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust;
The grave’s a fine and private place,
But none, I think, do there embrace.

Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may,
And now, like amorous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour
Than languish in his slow-chapped power.
Let us roll all our strength and all
Our sweetness up into one ball,
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Thorough the iron gates of life:
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.”
48 likes
“Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may,
And now, like amorous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour
Than languish in his slow-chapped power.
Let us roll all our strength and all
Our sweetness up into one ball,
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Thorough the iron gates of life:
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.”
16 likes
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