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The Falls (Inspector Rebus #12)

3.98 of 5 stars 3.98  ·  rating details  ·  5,455 ratings  ·  217 reviews
Ian Rankin's John Rebus, arguably the most realistic detective in crime fiction, is a brilliant but troubled man. When a young woman goes missing near his native Edinburgh, Scotland, Rebus finds himself just one small cog in the huge wheel of an inquiry set in motion by her powerfully rich father. Struggling to deal with both his own often-terrifying inner demons as well a ...more
Hardcover, 416 pages
Published November 12th 2001 by Minotaur Books (first published January 1st 2001)
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Steve
Lots of good writing, with a strong emphasis on locale and character. John Rebus is one of my favorite characters in crime fiction. That said, I found the story predictable, and the ending was not a surprise. I'd even call it secondary if Rankin hadn't spent hundreds of convoluted pages trying to give the novel legs. The Falls is worth reading to see how Rankin continues to develop a wonderfully flawed character, as Rebus' own sense of mortality (he's now in his mid 50s) becomes increasingly nea ...more
Bill
It's been about a year since I read my last Rebus mystery and I'm sorry it's taken me so long to read the next, The Falls. I can't recall when I've more enjoyed a mystery. Rebus and the gang are involved trying to solve the disappearance of a young woman, the gang including Siobhan Clark, Ellen Wylie, and new boss, Gill Templer. Rebus is looking at his life, as always, trying to sell his flat, see a potential new lady friend, fend off Templer's attempts to make him see a doctor, while investigat ...more
Terry
Not my favorite Rebus novel--where's the snappy dialogue? the incisive, witty description?--instead the strength of the novel is the full-throttle plot. Rebus and Siobhan investigate the death of a young socialite and find themselves knee-deep in hand-made miniature coffins with dolls in them and an online role-playing game run by the mysterious Quizmaster. These oddities make the mystery stand out and keep propelling the reader forward, even when the writing falls flat (!). It's like the novel ...more
Dorothy
One of my reading projects for the year has been to read the Inspector Rebus series. Ian Rankin first introduced his popular detective to us back in 1987, but I came to know him long after that.

I didn't complete all the Rebus books this year, but that just gives me something to look forward to in 2011. At this point, I'm up to number 12 in the series which runs through 17 books.

Rankin was always a good writer right from the beginning, but over the years he has just gotten better and better. Hi
...more
Christina
This was a good one. I spotted the murderer almost instantly and couldn't help feeling that Rebus really should have, too, but I didn't mind the ride. I also have to say I was so very, very relieved that Rankin has yet (in my experience anyway) to use the popular dark, gritty technique of (view spoiler) ...more
Lori
A very entertaining book. As always Rebus is at his cantankerous best in this one and yet every so often demonstrates a bit of a compassionate side: for Ellen Wylie's plight, his grief over Father Conor and with his new found love interest, Jean. He truly is one of the most well-rounded and 'real' characters in detective fiction today. John Rebus, I am one of your biggest fans. A couple of things stood out for me most in this story: the excellent plot, how wonderfully so many of the classic spot ...more
Shirley Schwartz
I love these books for the insider's look that I get into Edinburgh, Scotland. I love these books for the realistic John Rebus, one of my favourite fictional characters. I love them for the mysteries and the intricate plotting that is in each and every book. Ian Rankin knows how to write a story. This books shows an even more complex John Rebus. A young woman has gone missing and John and his team are doing everything possible to find her. As they continue to search, John realizes that there is ...more
Steve
Rebus Book 11[return][return]An Edinburgh student, daughter of a wealthy and influencial banking family, goes missing. There is no signs of struggle, no ransom demands, nothing. She simply fails to turn up to meet some friends, and isn� t seen again. Inspector Rebus, assisted by Siobhan Clarke is on the case, at least for now, but the only clues to the missing girl are an internet roleplaying game and a tiny wooden coffin found near her home, eerily similar to a set of small coffins found on an ...more
Claude
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. John Rebus grows on you. I would have given 5 stars, were it not for the fact that I knew whodunit ;-)
Jeanne
DI Rebus never fails to entertain. He seems a bit more likable in this book. Gill Templer has taken the Farmer's place as DCS. She's not any happier with John than her predecessor. Gill makes moves to bring Siobhan as her apprentice but Siobhan doesn't want to play the game the way Gill did. Gill chooses Ellen Wylie to be the spokesperson on a high profile missing persons case. Ellen has been set up to take the fall and she does. Rebus asks Gill for Ellen as his assistant. Siobhan and Grant are ...more
Simone Sinna

I thought I had maybe read a Rankin years ago and thought it too gritty/male/dour Scottish but forced indoors on a supposed summer (well it was Europe) holiday and scouring the farmhouse bookshelves I can up with this and another Rankin. It wasn’t what I had thought; rather a dense story with complex characters, lots of interplay between the cops and none of the Scottish brogue or excessive male cop grittiness and blood and guts wither. Okay, it was Scottish, so dour does come to mind. Rebus, Ra
...more
Ashley
I've been rapidly devouring the Rebus series in order of publication, and this was the first one to disappoint me, which is a shame because I was extremely curious to see how the computer games mixed with Burke and Hare coffins plot would work out.

Rankin seemed to be going through the motions with Rebus in this one, and to my surprise I found myself speed-reading through his chapters to get to Siobhan Clarke's sections. Where the writing of Rebus falters, Siobhan shines. I was also happy to see
...more
Vichy
Η Φλιπ εξαφανίζεται ενώ την περιμένουν οι φίλοι της σ’ ένα μπαρ. Είναι μια νεαρή φοιτήτρια, κόρη του τραπεζίτη Τζον Μπάλφουρ και φίλη του 22χρονου Ντέιβιντ Κοστέλο. Όλα τα αστυνομικά τμήματα του Εδιμβούργου οργανώνονται να βρουν τα ίχνη της. Φίλοι, συγγενείς, γείτονες, άπαντες καταθέτουν για 2 και 3 φορές. Ταυτόχρονα εντοπίζεται από την εκκεντρική Μπεβ Ντοντς μια μινιατούρα φέρετρο στην περιοχή Καταρράκτες. Η Τζιν Μπέρτσιλ, έφορος αρχαιοτήτων, φίλη της Τζιλ Τέμπλερ, της νέας αρχιεπιθεωρητού κάνε ...more
Chuck Slack
A great read. If you have been reading the series in order as I am you may appreciate the evolution of Siobhan. This is the part of this story I appreciated the most and it has me looking forward to the next one which is a sign of a great series!
Sally
Lots of history, of the Burke and Hare variety. Two culprits survive to stand trial, giving a lie to a comment I made about the last book. Rebus is suspended. No change there, except that this time it's for admitting to an infringement of confidentiality for which a colleague was responsible, as if he doesn't manage to get into enough trouble without taking on the ineptitude of others. He does manage to sustain a relationship for an entire novel, which is . . . novel. Oh, and there's an addition ...more
Bonnie
This makes the sixth Jon Rebus novel I have read and feel I know him personally. He is the most realistic detective in crime fiction with his doggedness in solving crimes, his love of pubs, his rebellion against authority and his knowledge of rock music.

In The Falls, a girl goes missing from her expensive flat paid for by her wealthy father. Rebus uncovers two leads: one, a carved wooden doll in a tiny casket; and the girl's involvement in a dark Internet-based role playing game. He relies on h
...more
Ian Mapp
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Wicknesan wijeyanandan
This was one of the most dragging book I’ve read. Quite hard to point out the reason for the dragging nature. It was with a nonchalant approach I was reading through the first half of the book.

It picks pace towards the end but still fails to make an impact.
Even though it claims to be a detective story it is actually about detectives and their life style, how they go about doing their job, expository narration helps little to enhance the interest in the reader.
Very less is spoken about the crime
...more
Avadhut
http://avadhutrecommends.wordpress.com/

When Phillipa Balfour, a student fails to turn up at a meeting with her friends and is not seen again, a big manhunt is carried out. Phillipa’s father, a prominent banker is able to pull lot of strings and the inquiry gets top priority. The case takes serious turn when police find a miniature doll in a coffin near the waterfalls on Balfour estate. Rebus is almost certain that Phillipa is dead by now but has no clue what role the coffin has in it. So he star
...more
Sundarraj Kaushik
Ian Rankin is definitely growing on me and slowly I am becoming a fan of Detective Inspector John Rebus and the characters around him. The book is themed around a young girl going missing and a miniature coffin with a doll inside it being spotted near a place called the The Falls, known so because of the four feet tall falls that is in the vicinity, around the same time. Inspector Rebus goes about investigating in his own inimitable way.

Gill Templar has become the new boss and Farmer has retired
...more
Ένας
Oι Καταρράκτες είναι το αποκορύφωμα μιας σειράς μελέτης του χαρακτήρα. Είναι μια περίεργη νουβέλα μυστηρίου, όπως θα περίμενες από τον Rankin. Αλλά αυτό που είναι πιο μαγευτικό είναι οι αλληλεπιδράσεις μεταξύ του αταίριαστου cast που δημιουργείται για να βοηθήσει στο μυστήριο της εξαφάνισης της κόρης ενός από τους πιο σημαντικούς τραπεζίτες του Εδιμβούργου.
Το κέντρο αυτού του αταίριαστου cast είναι ο detective John Rebus, που μένει στο προσκήνιο ακόμα και όταν ο Rankin προσπαθεί να τραβήξει τη
...more
Stephanie
This was a rather sluggish entry in the Rebus series. The case, which starts as a missing persons and evolves into something else, is rather mundane and is really a backdrop to the rest of the story which deals with our usual cast of characters. Rebus is being pushed by Gil Templar to see a doctor because she is concerned that his lifestyle of booze, lack of sleep and general malaise is pushing him towards an early retirement or worse. Templar has now taken Farmer's job since he has retired. Thi ...more
Spuddie
#13 DI Rebus Scottish police procedural set in Edinburgh. It's been ages since I read a Rebus--the last couple were rather disappointing to me--but Rankin is back in form with this book. The story, one of a young woman who had set off from her flat to meet some friends for drinks and never showed up, sucked me in right away. It's determined that Philippa Balfour ("Flip" to her friends) was playing a dungeons-and-dragons style game, with clues given by the Quizmaster via e-mail. But was this rela ...more
Jim
In terms of plot, this would be a very routine mystery, a detective who has problems with alcohol, authority, and women finds killers in exotic setting (assuming you don't live in Edinburgh). What makes the book stand out is that the focus is more on the lives of the detective and his mates than on the crime, and the writing has more imagination than the average thriller. One can imagine the literary fiction fan going astray here.

"Daytime drinking was special. In a bar, time ceased to exist, and
...more
Neill Smith
When the daughter of a rich banker goes missing the investigation leads to an Internet roleplaying game run by an anonymous Quizmaster and a carved wooden doll in a small coffin that leads Rebus to make connections with unsolved murders involving similar coffins and dolls dating back twenty or so years. Meanwhile people are being promoted and demoted within the constabulary with regards to public relations and it appears a mole is feeding information to disreputable reporters. This confounds Reb ...more
J
CONTAINS SPOILERS.

Curious police case in which Siobhan Clarke is as primary to the action as Rankin's usual 'headliner,' Scottish police detective John Rebus.

To solve the murder at hand - of a young yuppie woman - Clarke immerses herself in an online puzzle-solving game w. an unknown party.

"Falls" interweaves a current murder case w. a string of unsolved murders going back several decades. The two men responsible even overlap a bit:
the newly dead woman's boyfriend is her murderer, and is known t
...more
John
My third Rebus, after Black & Blue and Knots & Crosses. Better than the latter, and only a shade down from the former. A superb story combining unusual elements, one of which is the infamous miniature coffins found in Edinburgh in 1836. If I have a quibble with the book it's that it's slightly too long - but only ever so slightly. But overall it's an absorbing tale with vivid characters and locations. Four and a bit stars.
Michael
My second read in the Rebus series, as preparation to a trip to Edinburgh. Lots of plot. Very spread around among a large number of characters. Lots of grinding between the various sets of police involved in this. I'll bet Rankin books drive sales of scotch whisky. I've read a lot of the Brunetti books by Donna Leon and these do remind me of them, though the Venice comissario has a much happier home life.
Ted
Another Rebus booked that I thoroughly enjoyed both because of the characterization and the story. This one expands on the relationship between Rebus and Siobhan which was also prominent in the last novel. And no, not that kind of relationship. More on how DC Clarke is turning into Rebus. That's all I'll say without spoiling the read. Rebus does become involved in a new relationship which I won't indulge more about either. But it is the story that makes this one such a page turner. It involves m ...more
Louise
Inspector Rebus Novel #12

From cover:

"A student has gone missing in Edinburgh and there's very little for Detective Inspector John Rebus to go on apart from his gut feeling that there's more to this case than a runaway high on unaccustomed freedom.

Two leads emerge: a carved wooden doll in a tiny coffin and an Internet role playing game. Rebus concentrates on the coffin, eerily reminiscent of sixteen similar relics found on a hillside in 1836, leaving DC Siobhan Clarke to deal with the cyberspace
...more
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Goodreads Librari...: Combine pls 3 18 Oct 01, 2013 04:25AM  
whats your take on the not soo impressive presenting nature of the book? 3 41 Jul 17, 2013 03:09AM  
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33031
AKA Jack Harvey.

Born in the Kingdom of Fife in 1960, Ian Rankin graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1982 and then spent three years writing novels when he was supposed to be working towards a PhD in Scottish Literature. His first Rebus novel was published in 1987; the Rebus books are now translated into 22 languages and are bestsellers on several continents.

Ian Rankin has been elected a
...more
More about Ian Rankin...
Knots and Crosses (Inspector Rebus, #1) Exit Music (Inspector Rebus, #17) Black and Blue (Inspector Rebus, #8) Hide and Seek (Inspector Rebus, #2) Let it Bleed (Inspector Rebus, #7)

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“At the time, most bodies worked on by anatomists were cold indeed. They were brought to Edinburgh from all over Britain -- some came by way of the Union Canal. The resurrectionists -- body-snatchers -- pickled them in whisky for transportation. It was a lucrative trade."

"But did the whisky get drunk afterwards?"

Devlin chuckled. "Economics would dictate that it did.”
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“Places changing and people with them, dreams shifting ever further beyond reach.” 0 likes
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