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Karamzin's Memoir on Ancient and Modern Russia: A Translation and Analysis
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Karamzin's Memoir on Ancient and Modern Russia: A Translation and Analysis

3.38  ·  Rating Details  ·  8 Ratings  ·  1 Review
Russian history was typically studied through liberal or socialist lenses until Richard Pipes first published his translation of Karamzin's Memoir. Almost fifty years later, it is still the only English-language edition of this classic work. Still fresh and readable today, the Memoir-in which Alexander I's state historian elaborates his arguments for a strong Russian state ...more
Paperback, 288 pages
Published November 7th 2005 by University of Michigan Press (first published 1959)
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Maxx
May 11, 2013 Maxx rated it really liked it
Shelves: required-reading
While it is hard to agree with a text that defends autocracy and serfdom, Karamzin's frequently witty and insightful memoir takes a Burkean 'liberal conservative' approach to defending the supreme authority of the Tsar, casting it in the best light possible. Although espousing a distaste for all things foreign and non-Russian, the author writes with clear Enlightenment influences, specifically that of Montesquieu. A must for anyone interested in Tsarist ideology or its critics.
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Born in Poland, Richard Pipes emigrated to the United States in 1940, and became an American citizen in 1943, while serving in the Army Air Corps.

He was educated at Muskingum College and Cornell and Harvard Universities. He married Irene Eugenia Roth in 1946, and has two children.

Pipes taught at Harvard from 1950 until his retirement in 1996, and was director of Harvard's Russian Research Center f
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