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Antitrust Consent Decrees In Theory And Practice: Why Less Is More
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Antitrust Consent Decrees In Theory And Practice: Why Less Is More

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For over one hundred years, the antitrust consent decree has been a major weapon in the federal enforcement of antitrust laws. In Antitrust Consent Decrees in Theory and Practice, Richard A. Epstein undertakes the first systematic study of their use and effectiveness from both a historical and analytical perspective. Epstein observes how differences in antitrust philosophy ...more
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Published March 15th 2007 by AEI Press
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Richard A. Epstein is the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Law and Senior Lecturer at The University of Chicago Law School.

Epstein started his legal career at the University of Southern California, where he taught from 1968 to 1972. He served as Interim Dean from February to June, 2001.

He received an LLD, hc, from the University of Ghent, 2003. He has been a member of
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