Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Staff Your Church for Growth: Building Team Ministry in the 21st Century” as Want to Read:
Staff Your Church for Growth: Building Team Ministry in the 21st Century
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Staff Your Church for Growth: Building Team Ministry in the 21st Century

3.63  ·  Rating Details ·  35 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
Changing times make multiple-staff churches more necessary. This title explains the how, why, who, and when to add staff in a way that encourages growth.
Paperback
Published May 1st 2000 by Baker Books
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Staff Your Church for Growth, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Staff Your Church for Growth

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Brian Reagan
Aug 02, 2011 Brian Reagan rated it really liked it
Whether reading this text for effective management in churches or business, the principles will apply regardless. From a ministry perspective, this book will challenge pastors and other leaders in the church, especially boards or other decision-making volunteers to question whether they help or hinder forward progress.

For pastors/preachers the issue is about knowing when to add what, who, when and why. Failure to add the right people at the right time will cripple a church, but being too top he
...more
Tim Tuttle
Tim Tuttle rated it it was amazing
Feb 19, 2016
Greg Fish
Greg Fish rated it liked it
Sep 27, 2012
Michael Davis
Michael Davis rated it it was amazing
Nov 19, 2011
Angela
Angela rated it really liked it
Jan 02, 2015
Jeff
Jeff rated it it was amazing
Feb 20, 2015
Danny
Danny rated it really liked it
Nov 01, 2011
Ron
Ron rated it really liked it
Dec 20, 2015
Segundo Lopez
Segundo Lopez rated it it was ok
Apr 27, 2013
Ray Mckinnon
Ray Mckinnon rated it it was amazing
Feb 16, 2015
Marius
Marius rated it did not like it
May 13, 2015
Jack Tsai
Jack Tsai rated it really liked it
Dec 12, 2013
Michelle Bodle
May 15, 2014 Michelle Bodle rated it it was amazing
I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to evaluate or advance staffing within their church
Joe Mayo
Joe Mayo rated it it was amazing
Sep 02, 2016
Karen Jeffries
Karen Jeffries rated it really liked it
Feb 03, 2015
Benjamin Neeley
Benjamin Neeley rated it really liked it
Apr 20, 2016
Chris Huff
Chris Huff rated it liked it
Mar 19, 2009
Bill Bridgman
Bill Bridgman rated it liked it
Oct 24, 2014
Michael Edwards
Michael Edwards rated it liked it
Mar 28, 2015
Andy
Andy rated it it was amazing
Oct 29, 2016
Nancyp
Nancyp rated it really liked it
May 26, 2014
Michael
Michael rated it did not like it
Jan 17, 2016
Kevin Purcell
Kevin Purcell rated it liked it
Apr 17, 2014
Ronald
Ronald rated it really liked it
Nov 05, 2013
Tiffany Cresswell
Tiffany Cresswell rated it liked it
May 27, 2014
Keith Ramage
Keith Ramage rated it really liked it
Mar 07, 2008
Collin Vanderhoof
Collin Vanderhoof rated it liked it
May 10, 2016
Jeff
Jeff rated it liked it
Aug 15, 2012
Loril Hawk
Loril Hawk rated it really liked it
Sep 10, 2012
Tom
Tom rated it really liked it
Oct 21, 2015
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Share This Book



“Teams need both leadership and management. Popular author Stephen R. Covey explains: Leadership deals with direction—with making sure that the ladder is leaning against the right wall. Management deals with speed. To double one’s speed in the wrong direction, however, is the very definition of foolishness. Leadership deals with vision—with keeping the mission in sight—and with effectiveness and results. Management deals with establishing structure and systems to get those results. It focuses on efficiency, cost-benefit analyses, logistics, methods, procedures, and policies.[6]” 0 likes
“Auren Uris, a highly respected researcher and writer in the fields of human resources and management, supports the importance of small teams. He writes, “There is growing evidence that the most creative problemsolving or decisionmaking will occur in small, odd-numbered groups (5, 7, 9).” He advises, “If you want originality and creative contributions, . . . keep the group small. Five people is the number many researchers suggest for optimum efficiency, freedom of exchange and cooperation.”[5]” 0 likes
More quotes…