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On Being A Pagan
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On Being A Pagan

4.07 of 5 stars 4.07  ·  rating details  ·  54 ratings  ·  6 reviews
In this small masterpiece, the great French thinker Alain de Benoist claims that only the pagan deities of ancient Europe offer a spiritual recourse to the present religious malaise. The guilt, the fear, the narrow petty-bourgeois obsession with well-being, and the self-loathing love of the Other that has left Western man defenseless before the destructive behaviors of our ...more
Paperback, 233 pages
Published 2004 by Ultra (first published 1981)
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Karen Engelsen
Oct 13, 2007 Karen Engelsen marked it as to-read
n this small masterpiece, the great French thinker Alain de Benoist claims that only the pagan deities of ancient Europe offer a spiritual recourse to the present religious malaise. The guilt, the fear, the narrow petty-bourgeois obsession with well-being, and the self-loathing love of the Other that has left Western man defenseless before the destructive behaviors of our nihilist age derive from the alien belief system that Christianity introduced to the West. They are not part of the pagan spi ...more
Stephen
The title of this book ought to be "On Not Being Jewish". Depending on whether politics is something the reader thinks about a lot, or something the reader does and lives, this book will be either appear to be profound or a useful specimen of a political type.
treus
De Benoist shows the fundamentals of what the pagan world represented and how its echoes are still present today. This is contrasted with monotheism. Essential for pagans/pantheists, and monotheists that think modern pagans have bad arguments.
Erisson
Aug 06, 2008 Erisson marked it as to-read
Recommended to Erisson by: plutonica.net
Shelves: pagan, philosophy
From this review on plutonica.net this sounds like a very interesting book.
Ashley Yakeley
I have a long review here.
Wulf Grimsson
Truly magnificent work
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Alain de Benoist (born 11 December 1943) is a French academic, philosopher, a founder of the Nouvelle Droite (New Right) and head of the French think tank GRECE. Benoist is a critic of liberalism, free markets and egalitarianism.
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“In the Bible, man is only free to submit or be damned. His one freedom is the renunciation of that freedom. He finds his “salvation” by freely accepting his subjugation. The Christian ideal, says Saint Paul, is to be freely “subservient to God” (Romans 6:22).” 3 likes
“Adam and Eve, placed in the garden of Eden, find themselves forbidden to eat of “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” (Genesis 2:17). Catholic theologians believe this “knowledge” forbidden by Elohim-Yahweh is neither omniscience nor moral discernment, but the ability to decide what is good or evil. Jewish theology is more subtle. The “tree” of the knowledge is interpreted as the representation of a world where good and evil “are in a combined state,” where there is no absolute Good and Evil. In other words, the “tree” is a foreshadowing of the real world we live in, a world where nothing is absolutely clear cut, where moral imperatives are tied to human values, and where everything of any greatness and importance always takes place beyond good and evil. Furthermore, in the Hebrew tradition “to eat” means “to assimilate.” To eat of the tree of knowledge of good and evil is therefore to personally enter this real world where human initiative “combines” good and evil. Adam’s transgression, from which all the others are derived, is clearly “that of autonomy,” accordingly, as emphasized by Eisenberg and Abecassis, this would be “the desire to conduct his own history alone in according to his own desire and his own word or law.” 3 likes
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