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Eustache Deschamps: Selected Poems

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Eustache Deschamps studied under the tutelage of Guillaume de Marchault, traveled in Syria, Palestine, and Egypt-where he was said to have been made a slave-and eventually become recognized as one of the great French medieval poets. He was the first writer to dissociate lyric poetry from its musical setting and his witty perceptions comment on nearly all aspects of daily l ...more
Hardcover, 253 pages
Published February 28th 2003 by Routledge
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“Happy is he who has no children, for babies mean nothing but crying and stench; they give only trouble and anxiety; they have to be clothed, shod and fed; they are always in danger of falling and hurting themselves; they contract some illness and die. When they grow up, they may go bad and be put in prison. Nothing but cares and sorrows; no happiness compensates us for our anxiety, for the trouble and expense of their education. The poet has no word [for it all] (second half of the XIVth century)” 0 likes
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