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4.15 of 5 stars 4.15  ·  rating details  ·  40 ratings  ·  11 reviews
Two Ojibway sisters set off across the frozen north country to see the SkySpirits' midnight dance. It isn't easy for the younger sister to be silent, but gradually she begins to treasure the stillness and the wonderful experiences it brings. After an exhilarating walk and patient waiting, the girls are rewarded by the arrival of the SkySpirits -- the northern lights -- dan ...more
Published October 1st 2000 by Kids Can Press
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Lisa Vegan
Apr 25, 2010 Lisa Vegan rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: children who can enjoy quiet, gentle stories, especially kids who appreciate the natural world
Recommended to Lisa by: Abigail A.
The illustrations are absolutely luminous and beautiful, and the story would not be anywhere near as good without them. A quiet and gentle story about two Ojibway sisters who go out at night to see the northern lights, which they call SkySisters. It’s very sweet, but might be too tame for some children. Children interested in nature, animals, the sky, and/or sisterhood should enjoy this book. I think it’s lovely, and I’d love to see a display of the Aurora Borealis these sisters get to experienc ...more
Julian Franklin
Jan Bourdeau Waboose is a Nishnawbe Ojibway Native American on whom the story is based off of. She ties in experiences from her own childhood of her and her older sister and the Norther Lights. She uses words from her own language- Nishiime, younger sister, Nimise, older sister, and Nokomis, grandmother- to build the story and have a stronger connection to her culture. She is able to captivate children with this thrilling story, and teach about her culture.
This book can be used in the classroom
Maddy Hay
Two Sisters journey up Coyote Hill to see the Sky spirits. The big sister leads her youngest up the hill continually reminding her to be quiet as the travel up the mountain. The younger sister has a hard time remember her mother's words that, "Wisdom comes on silent wings", until they reach the top and as they sit in silent the sky spirits come. The youngest sister finds joy in the quiet and in the spirits. They continue to watch and notice the spirits that are dancing are sisters as well!

I like
This is a wonderful book. Not only are the pictures, story, and characters engaging, but it is such a treat to see Native Americans portrayed in a modern time period. Allie and Alex are two young girls who take a walk in the woods to look for the SkySpirits (Northern lights). They have some sibling rivalry, but they also obviously care for one another and like sharing the time together. The illustrations, done on a fairly rough canvas that gives the impression of snow falling, are lovely and rea ...more
John Sullivan
Two sisters go out one night to the top of the hill. Most of the story is focused on their journey and their interaction, which is wonderfully accurate for two sisters. What makes this book even more special is the younger sister relating their relationship to that of their mother and their aunt. The young narrator seems a bit too sophisticated for her age, but this does not distract the reader from sisters rite of passage. Skysisters is a great book for young readers, especially those who have ...more
Two sisters climb a snowy hill in the late night to observe the coming of the aurora borealis, the northern lights. They are forewarned by their mother that "wisdom comes on silent wings," reminding them that they will observe and learn nothing if their mouths are flapping.

Readers journey along with the two sisters as they experience icicles and trudging up steep snow covered hills.

A true Native American tale told by a true Native American.
This is a great story for understanding one of the beliefs and values of the Anishinawbe Ojibway regarding SkySpirits and listening - "wisdon comes on silent wings" (p. 2). The story is heartwarming and the artwork is captivating.

I plan to use this as a resource for my grade 7 social studies to help my students explore the worldview of First Nations prior to the arrival of European explorers.
Enjoyed this book featuring two Ojibwe sisters who go on a nighttime walk to see the Northern Lights. The action was a little slow but it really captured a sense of wonder.
Originally published in Canada.
Two Ojibway sisters seek out the SkySpirits (the Northern Lights).
A sweet little story, especially apt for sisters. The illustrations are slightly impressionistic.
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