Universal Rights Down to Earth
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Universal Rights Down to Earth

3.67 of 5 stars 3.67  ·  rating details  ·  6 ratings  ·  2 reviews
The idea of universal rights—rights shared by all citizens, regardless of nationality, creed, wealth, or geography—has a powerful grip on the way many people feel about justice and global politics. No one should be subjected to torture or disappearance, to starvation or sex trafficking, to economic exploitation or biased treatment under the law. But when it comes to actual...more
Paperback, 160 pages
Published December 3rd 2012 by W. W. Norton & Company (first published November 28th 2011)
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MH
4.5

Ford makes an eloquent, convincing case for the need to be more flexible and pragmatic about human rights, using case studies effectively to demonstrate his point. Yet there were only a few real life examples, and I would have enjoyed a more in depth analysis of the implications of his conclusions. Nonetheless this was an eye-opening account and, among many other things, made clear the need to be pragmatic in implementing human rights locally (that is, by working with local contexts and restr...more
Rachel
Not what I was expecting. Rather than extolling the virtues of human rights (like much of what I read at AU), Ford examines practical examples and pushes for human rights to be practiced with the same cost/benefit analysis and close attention of local public policy.
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Richard Thompson Ford is the George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. He has pub­lished regularly on the topics of civil rights, constitutional law, race rela­tions, and antidiscrimination law. He is a regular contributor to Slate and has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He is the author of Racial Culture: A C...more
More about Richard Thompson Ford...
The Race Card: How Bluffing about Bias Makes Race Relations Worse Rights Gone Wrong: How Law Corrupts the Struggle for Equality Racial Culture: A Critique The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse In Pursuit of a Dream Deferred: Linking Housing and Education Policy (Teaching Texts in Law and Politics, #5)

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