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Ocean of Reasoning: A Great Commentary on Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika
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Ocean of Reasoning: A Great Commentary on Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika

4.50  ·  Rating Details  ·  26 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Tsong khapa (14th-15th centuries) is arguably the most important and influential philosopher in Tibetan history. His Ocean of Reasoning is the most extensive and perhaps the deepest extant commentary on N=ag=arjuna's M?lamadhyamakak=arik=a (Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way), and it can be argued that it is impossible to discuss N=ag=arjuna's work in an informed way wit ...more
Paperback, 464 pages
Published April 20th 2006 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 2006)
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bad
Nov 22, 2008 bad rated it really liked it
Shelves: buddhism
analysis of phenomenon from the tibetan geluk madhyamaka school of buddhism. the analysis consists of various very well-defined reasonings pertaining to self-emptiness, existence and conceptuality, leading first to an inferential knowledge, built through meditation and contemplation into direct cognition of the true nature of reality - suchness. the reasonings are very old, but this text was composed by je tsongkhapa for instruction of gelukpa monks and the establishment of dharma around 13xx ad ...more
Scott
Aug 05, 2011 Scott rated it it was amazing
This is a 15th century commentary on a 2nd century text translated in the 21 century into English. The root text is likely one of the most complicated or esoteric philosophical ideas of the last two millenium. It's like taking your brain apart and putting it back together piece by piece. Be careful when you dip into this casual text.
Farhan M
May 16, 2011 Farhan M is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Trying out something obscure - a 14th century Tibetan commentary of a seminal 1st century Buddhist Philosophy text
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Je Tsognkhapa (Tib.: tsong kha pa, ཙོང་ཁ་པ། "The Man from Onion Valley") was a monk of the Sakya tradition of Tibetan Buddhism whose activities led to the formation of the Geluk school, though he never announced the establishment of a new monastic order himself. He is also known by his ordained name Lobsang Drakpa (blo bzang grags pa) or simply as Je Rinpoche (rje rin po che).
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