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Zakboekje

4.18  ·  Rating Details  ·  5,517 Ratings  ·  451 Reviews
Het Zakboekje van Epictetus bevat 'wenken voor een juiste houding in uiteenlopende levenssituaties'. Ze zijn opgetekend door een van de leerlingen van deze wijsgeer uit de eerste eeuw na Christus.
Paperback, 104 pages
Published October 2011 by Uitgeverij Boom (first published 125)
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Brandon It is a selection from the available material; unfortunately there are no footnotes to indicate where each of the sections come from. The words used…moreIt is a selection from the available material; unfortunately there are no footnotes to indicate where each of the sections come from. The words used in this one are more modern, but I still find Elizabeth Carter's 1758 translation often seems just as modern. Probably because Epictetus expressed himself with very plain language.(less)
J.D. The name "enchiridion" means "manual" or "handbook" in Greek, but there are many translations available in English, the title just seemed to stick.…moreThe name "enchiridion" means "manual" or "handbook" in Greek, but there are many translations available in English, the title just seemed to stick. There are even public domain (legally free) recordings and ebooks/texts of it online. The free audiobook is here: https://librivox.org/the-enchiridion-... And the free online text version of that translation is here: http://classics.mit.edu/Epictetus/epi... -- I happen to like this translation by Elizabeth Carter, but there are many other translations in English, as well.(less)

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Hadrian
A little something to read on Thanksgiving. Maybe after this, I'll leaf through Seneca, then watch Charlie Brown or something.

One of the big three stoics, with the authors being Marcus Aurelius and Seneca. Epictetus recieved no formal schooling, and was a slave for most of his life. No self-pity. Instead, independence, fearlessness, and acceptance of death and suffering. Self-rule and self-improvement. Forgiveness, acceptance, and understanding.

Almost resembles some forms of Buddhism. In many w
...more
Mohammad Ali

تکیه ی این رساله چنانکه از نخستین بند آن نیز مشخص است، تأکید بر محدودیت توانایی بشری است - به بیان دیگر امور از دو دسته خارج نیستند یا در دستان مایند یا خارج از توان ما؛ آنچه حقیقتا در سلطه ی ما قرار دارد امور درونی - یعنی نیات و آرزوها و ... - است و نه امور بیرونی - تن و مال و ... . آدمی باید دلبستگی و تعلق خاطر و آرزو نسبت به آنچه از آن او نیست را از وجود خود حذف کند تا بتواند با آرامش خاطر به زندگی ادامه دهد. با دلبریدن از امور خارج از خود می توان مقرون به آزادی و آسایش زیست و این همان زندگی
...more
Marcus
Jul 28, 2009 Marcus rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Stoicism according to Epictetus, is:
Don't demand that things happen as you wish, but wish that they happen as they do happen, and you will go on well.

and:
If you ever happen to turn your attention to externals, so as to wish to please anyone, be assured that you have ruined your scheme of life.

My favorite quote, maybe because it's so personally relevant and so incisive, is, and bear with Epictetus, this one is a bit long-winded:
In every affair consider what precedes and follows, and then undert
...more
Vaishali Joglekar
I maintain the oldest writings are the absolute best. A fantastic collection of 52 maxims (#29 seems to be missing), as timeless as they are wise.

Some quotes:
-----------
#1. Some things are in our control and others are not. Work, therefore, to be able to say to every harsh appearance, “You are but an appearance, and not absolutely the thing you appear to be.”

#5. Do not be proud of any excellence that is not yours. If a horse thinks “I am handsome”, that is acceptable. But if you the owner boas
...more
Bob Nichols
Jun 30, 2010 Bob Nichols rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Favorable commentary on Epictetus lodges this collection of sayings within a wider, deeper Stoic philosophy. In a nutshell, the cosmos operates by natural law that is beyond our control. Things in the cosmos are transitory and permanent attachment is not possible. The task for the Stoic philosopher, such as Epictetus, is to focus only on those actions that are within one's power to control and to act without attachment. This is the law of the cosmos that we know through our rationality, which be ...more
Jim
This short and simple work of stoic philosophy is as valid as when it was first penned two thousand years ago. Epictetus started life as a Greek slave, but wound up in Rome. His Enchiridion distinguishes sharply between those things we can control and those we cannot:
Some things are in our control and others not. Things in our control are opinion, pursuit, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever are our own actions. Things not in our control are body, property, reputation, command, and, in on
...more
Tannaz
Aug 21, 2016 Tannaz rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
چه معجزه ای بزرگتر از این که کسی از دوهزار و اندی سال پیش با من حرف بزند و نشنیده به سوال هایم جواب بدهد. آرامش رواقی همه آن چیزی است که دلخوری بین من و فلسفه، علی الخصوص فیلسوف تخس و دوست داشتنی، شوپنهاور، را به کل مرتفع کرد!
Ken Moten
Jan 25, 2015 Ken Moten rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Ken by: Peter Adamson
"If anyone tells you that a certain person speaks ill of you, do not make excuses about what is said of you but answer, "He was ignorant of my other faults, else he would not have mentioned these alone."

This philosophical text is a collection of 52 quotes or sayings or advice by Epictetus. It has been collected by one of his students and is presented as almost a proto-handbook style format.

This handbook is a wealth of good information and I feel I was very impressed with it overall. Some of the
...more
Jake Adelstein
Jul 03, 2011 Jake Adelstein rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
No man is free who is not master of himself. -Epictetus
It's something worth remembering on the 4th of July. Independence Day.

"Forgive Over and Over and Over.""Never suppress a generous impulse." One of the greatest books of philosophy I've ever read. It is more of a reinterpretation of the Stoic philosopher Epictetus than a straight academic translation but it wonderfully conveys the wisdom of a a great philosopher who was born a slave. If you ever find yourself at a point in your life when eve
...more
Jacobi
Jan 31, 2015 Jacobi rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: books-read
As much a classic work of philosophy, as it is a treatise on how to live (as a stoic), the Enchiridion is dope. Because this is essentially a list of rules that is the length of an extended essay, I'll be rereading it (probably multiple times) to digest it further. Sure, there are some principles I don't subscribe to, but there is a lot of good stuff in this to mull over.

I think it's interesting that something that was written more than 1,880 years ago can still be applicable to life today, as
...more
Frank
Nothing that most people don't know. Really. I'm not trying to appear brilliant. I gave 2 stars because the ideas are expressed in a lovely, straightforward prose.

The problem I have with this work is that Epictetus, it seems to this non-classicist, does not give value to responsibility of obligation. For example, I sense that if someone was unhappy in a marriage, Epictetus would tell that someone to leave the marriage instead of working it out. I also sense he did not put value in emotions of p
...more
Luciana Nery
Aug 04, 2014 Luciana Nery rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The opening line reads like a secular mantra:

"Some things are in our control and others not. Things in our control are opinion, pursuit, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever are our own actions. Things not in our control are body, property, reputation, command, and in one word, whatever are not our actions".

Further along, what to do with this realization:

"Work, therefore, to be able to say to every harsh appearance, "You are but an appearance, and not absolutely the thing you appear to be
...more
Curtiss
May 07, 2008 Curtiss rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone
Shelves: philosophy
I first heard Epictetus quoted after the incident in which the cruiser U.S.S. Vincennes shot down an Iranian airliner in 1990, during a period of tension in the Persian Gulf (what else?).

A friend and I were discussing the ramifications and liabilty of the Vincennes's Captain, when a gentleman at the next table said that he knew of an apt quote which he often used in court when a case was going against him and the opposing counsel was roundly denouncing him in front of the judge. He would stand a
...more
Heart
Repetitive. A contemporary of Socrates. Beautiful.
Peter J.
Feb 16, 2013 Peter J. rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I have read this probably 5 times. Looking forward to discussing it in heaven with him since he will surely be there.
Ilke
May 13, 2016 Ilke rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
"Eğer birisi sizin bedeninizi alıp yoldan geçen birisine köle olarak verirse doğallıkla öfkeye kapılırsınız. O kişi sizi yerden yere vurduğunda üzülürsünüz. O zaman herhangi bir kişi sizi etkilemek istediğinde, çok değerli olan zihninizi verirken neden hiç utanç duymuyorsunuz? Sizinle iğrenç şeyler paylaştıktan sonra sizi kafası karışmış ve dağılmış bir halde bırakacak birisine zihninizi teslim etmeden önce ikinci bir kez daha düşünün. " Bu satırların hayatıma kattığı farkındalık nedeniyle iyi k ...more
Dionysus
Sep 07, 2015 Dionysus rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy
When I found this book in the library, I was put off by the fact that it is described on the cover as "a new interpretation by Sharon Lebell". I can only assume that to mean that this is not so much a translation of Epictetus's words as it is Sharon Lebell's interpretation of what Epictetus meant. With all due respect to her, if given the choice i'd much rather read Epictetus's actual work and interpret it for myself, thanks.

That said, even though it is difficult to know how faithful this "inte
...more
Kathryne
Jul 26, 2008 Kathryne rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone
Easy read. Great wisdom. For instance: "Follow through on all your generous impulses. Do not question them, especially if a friend needs you; act on his or her behalf. Do not hesitate! Do not sit around speculating about the possible inconvenience, problems or dangers. As long as you let your reason lead the way, you will be safe. It is our duty to stand by our friends in their hour of need."

One other very different but solid word of wisdom from so many in this book:

"When we name things correctl
...more
Ivan Damjanović
Nov 29, 2015 Ivan Damjanović rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Ovaj ’priručnik’, prema pročitanom sudeći, reprezentativan je primjer stoičke filozofije temeljene, jasno, na trezvenom razmišljanju i introspekciji (izm. ost.). Epiktetu, očito, najveći autoritet predstavlja Sokrat, na kojega se često ovdje poziva. Dio savjeta je opće poznat, na druge se valja podsjetiti, a na ostatak, možda i po prvi puta svratiti pozornost. Neke naputke doživio sam malo pretjeranim: "Ne pričajte puno o onome što se zbilo jer biste time dokazali da je događaj na vas ostavio ut ...more
Laura Leaney
Jul 20, 2010 Laura Leaney rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I've owned this book for fifteen years, and every once in a while I am compelled to pull it from the shelf on my bookcase devoted to pagan philosophers in order to remind myself to get a grip on my kvetching.

This slender book is not a translation of Epictetus, so one must be careful. Instead, the author summarizes the philosopher's key ideas. But his ideas make so much clear sense that no matter your religious affiliation, understanding stoicism will strengthen your character. IF you can implem
...more
NYCman
Jan 09, 2016 NYCman rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Just what the title says, from one of the actual "greats" of philosophy. You'd be silly not to read it.
Louis
Apr 27, 2016 Louis rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: life-altering
Don't curse the wind, hoist the sails

In all honesty, I stole the above opening line, but it points out the essence of the book.
It is not the external factors that define our life, it is how we respond to these external stimuli that determine everything.
This alone is so radically refreshing I have trouble believing I had never heard of Epictetus before.
Imagine a person insulting you in your face. You have some options: you can insult him back, you can ignore him, you can minimize his disrespect.
...more
Swarochisha Kandregula
I'm Glad I came around to reading this book. Though it is a small book ,it is really thought provoking . It can make one question one's beliefs, views and ,in my case, keep one up at night thinking about some of the quotes from the book. A must read, at least once.

Some of my favorite ones from the book:

Begin by prescribing to yourself some character and demeanor, such as you may preserve both alone and in company.

Men are disturbed not by things, but by the views which they take of things. Thus d
...more
Kevin Cole
Jul 14, 2014 Kevin Cole rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is Stoic philosophy at its best. It's not long-winded like Seneca, not distracting with its style like Marcus Aurelius. Epictetus is simple and to the point. You will not be confused.

Unlike Aurelius and Seneca, Epictetus was not high born. In fact, as I understand it, he was a slave for a good portion of his life. A slave who embraced Stoicism holds more street cred for me.
Jack
Apr 19, 2016 Jack rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Enchiridion is one of the core texts of Stoic philosophy. This translation has its merits, but I much prefer Marcus Aurelius Meditations on the subject.

Epictetus was a teacher, and this short collection is a disorganized collection of his lessons, many only 1-3 sentences long. It has valuable philosophies and lessons, but it is like reading a printout of statutory law: stark and dry. This could be a result of Long’s translation. I plan on reading Elizabeth Carter’s translation in the near futur
...more
Skylar Primm
Jan 01, 2016 Skylar Primm rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Where has this book been all my life? For the past 10 plus years, the answer has been "on my bookshelf, unread." I'm happy that I finally picked it up, and that I waited until I was immersed in the world of mindfulness and had come to terms with my own anxiety.

Epictetus–as channeled by Sharon Lebell–has so many spot-on observations and prescriptions for living a fulfilling life that it's hard to overstate how meaningful I found this slim book. Perhaps the best I can do is use the author's words,
...more
Max
May 31, 2016 Max rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Quel petit livre empli de sagesse! Il est évident qu'avec nos connaissances en psychologie on sait qu'il est impossible, purement par la volonté, d'éliminer nos désirs, de choisir à 100% où se dirige notre aversion, ou d'être indifférent à tout ce qui ne dépend pas de tout. Et même si nous le pouvions je me demande si une vie sans peine, sans déception, sans chagrin, mais aussi sans grande joies en est une plus belle qu'une avec des hauts et des bas. Aussi, Épictète porte certains jugement sur l ...more
Luis
Feb 28, 2009 Luis rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Epictetus was a model human being, who went from slave to enlightened man. Like all great personalities of history, he never wrote anything and what we know of him and his teachings was written by his pupils and followers. This is a short, straight to the point manual on how to live a virtuous life. The beginning of happiness, asserts Epictetus, is in not fretting about the things we cannot control. We have to not so much talk about virtuous acts as to behave virtuously. As Gandhi said “Be the c ...more
Billie Pritchett
I have always enjoyed this book. Epictetus was a former Roman slave, and he became one of the leading advocates for Stoicism. Not only is the book direct in its instruction on how to live a better life, it has almost none of the religious baggage that, say, a work like Marcus Aurelius' Meditations has. In general, I think it is a decent framework for how to live a meaningful life. Epictetus advises that what should be of primary importance to every person are those aspects of one's life that all ...more
Lady Jane
Oct 08, 2011 Lady Jane rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I love this book. Practical age-tested wisdom. One of my favorite quotes from the book:

"Some things are in our control and others are not. Things in our control are opinion, pursuit, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever are our own actions. Things not in our control are body, property, reputation, command, and, in one word, whatever are not our own actions. Things in our control are by nature free, unrestrained, unhindered; but those not in our control are weak, slavish, restrained, belon
...more
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Epictetus was a Greek Stoic philosopher. He was probably born a slave at Hierapolis, Phrygia (present day Pamukkale, Turkey), and lived in Rome until his exile to Nicopolis in northwestern Greece, where he lived most of his life and died. His teachings were noted down and published by his pupil Arrian in his Discourses. Philosophy, he taught, is a way of life and not just a theoretical discipline. ...more
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“Don't just say you have read books. Show that through them you have learned to think better, to be a more discriminating and reflective person. Books are the training weights of the mind. They are very helpful, but it would be a bad mistake to suppose that one has made progress simply by having internalized their contents." Translation by Sharon Lebell” 330 likes
“People are not disturbed by things, but by the views they take of them.” 129 likes
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