Seed Magic
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Seed Magic

2.88 of 5 stars 2.88  ·  rating details  ·  24 ratings  ·  9 reviews
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published March 1st 2012 by Peachtree
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Tasha
Rose and her brothers make fun of the old man who feeds the pigeons all day long from his wheelchair. When Rose asks him why he likes pigeons so much, he tells her how beautiful they are. But Rose can’t see it at all; she thinks that gardens are much more lovely than birds. So Birdman gives her some seeds to put outside her window and grow a garden on her windowsill. Rose knows that it won’t work, since there’s no dirt for them to grow in, but Birdman is insistent that they will grow a garden on...more
Barbara
Sometimes it's hard to find beauty when you live in a city. When Rose and her brothers watch the man they call Birdman feed the pigeons, they tease him because they don't understand his affection for the birds. In Rose's eyes, beauty comes in the form of gardens filled with "blue lupines, red geraniums, yellow sunflowers" (unpaginated). When Birdman gives her some seeds, she plants them on the windowsill and waits. What happens next surprises her, but helps her see possible magic in the world ar...more
Marathon County Public Library MCPL

Rose dreams of beautiful gardens. She shares her dreams with an old man in a wheelchair who is feeding pigeons at the city park. He gives her some “magic” seeds and instructs her to place them on her concrete windowsill. In this colorful, beautifully illustrated picture book Rose discovers that seeds can grow a brightly colored garden in unexpected ways. This simple picture book is perfect for preschoolers.

Sharyn H. / Marathon County Public Library
Find this book in our library catalog.
Lynne
Beautiful pictures. Good idea. Writing - ah, not so much. There was a lack of cadence to the speech of the characters that I found awkward.
Jessica
Appeal characteristics: modern art feel, unique story aspect

I'm not sure how to describe this book. I'm not sure if the message is look at the ugly and make it beautiful...or crazy people aren't necessarily crazy? It has remnants of fairy tale/fable elements but I felt the storyline did not quite connect. The art almost overshadows the story itself as I was more interested to how the book was illustrated than about the story at all!
Shelli
Terrible. I didn't like the broken up way the characters in this book spoke. Not 1 person spoke in a complete sentence, grammar so bad that I would feel the need to instruct after every sentence "Now how could you say or right that correctly?"
Malissa
This book is on the Fountas and Pinnell genre list from their latest book. They apparently see something I don't. The wording was weird, the story ends too quickly without showing character change. It won't make my list!
Edward Sullivan
Colorful, vibrant illustrations don't quite jell with the awkward rhyming text.
Emily Yates
Emily Yates marked it as to-read
Dec 08, 2012
Heather
Heather marked it as to-read
Nov 23, 2012
CCPL Youth Services
CCPL Youth Services marked it as to-read
Jul 06, 2012
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