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Xứ tuyết

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3.71  ·  Rating Details  ·  9,993 Ratings  ·  861 Reviews
Xứ tuyết (tiếng Nhật: 雪国 Yukiguni, Tuyết quốc) là tiểu thuyết đầu tay của văn hào Nhật Bản Kawabata Yasunari, được khởi bút từ 1935 và hoàn thành năm 1947. Trước khi xuất bản dưới dạng ấn phẩm hoàn chỉnh, tác phẩm đã được đăng tải thành nhiều kỳ trên nhật báo. Xứ tuyết được đánh giá là quốc bảo của nền văn học Nhật Bản. Cùng với Ngàn cánh hạc (千羽鶴 Senbazuru, Thiên vũ hạc) ...more
Paperback, 231 pages
Published 1995 by NXB Hội Nhà Văn (first published 1948)
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Dingkang Zhang I think if you want to merely read a book about geishas, this might not be the one which you are looking for. Regardless of this, I think the easiest…moreI think if you want to merely read a book about geishas, this might not be the one which you are looking for. Regardless of this, I think the easiest way to find this book is via amazon. I think it is always more convenient to order books online.(less)
Rebecca This book is short but very poetic. Pretty simple but with some sad undertones at the relationships and their possibilities or impossibilities. I…moreThis book is short but very poetic. Pretty simple but with some sad undertones at the relationships and their possibilities or impossibilities. I enjoyed it overall. Very lovely.(less)
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Dolors
Jul 23, 2015 Dolors rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Use your imagination
Shelves: read-in-2015, asian
Shimamura gets on a train to dreamland. He escapes from the urbanity of Tokyo, from the grayish routine, the dull marriage, the mediocre reality that leaves him numb and empty in search of the purest expression of his desires. He is a dilettante, an expert aesthetician who knows that beauty lingers in memory of times past, on the glint of two sad eyes sparkling in a pale face, in a head tilted at a certain angle, in fragrances and sounds and the noiseless rippling waves that assimilate a caress. ...more
Garima
Aug 06, 2014 Garima rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
turn this way!
I too feel lonely
late in autumn
~ Basho's Haiku

As if on a winter’s night a traveler, travels to a distant land, where the snow falls even on the maple leaves. Where lovers part to meet and meet to part. Where love is nothing but a mirrored reality or a fogged illusion. Where one heart has room only for the pleasure of regaining what had been lost and another voice is so beautiful that it’s almost lonely and sad. Where some deaths are tiny but invoke immense poetry and several lives
...more
Seemita
Jan 01, 2016 Seemita rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Winter Wanderers with something to lose
I am white, mostly. And cold. And occasionally, weeping. But you don’t see my tears, for they run down the stream and lose their essence at the prolonged kiss of the first sun. But I do not mind. I come alive to die; I bulk up to surrender; I appear to vanish. But I, too, have admirers. Admirers, who eye ephemeral beauty with a stinging lacquer of depleting life, colluding their vision with a bagful of clouded vignettes stroking the air that arises after all is consumed and lost.

Visiting Japan
...more
Ian GalaDali
Shimamura’s Tale Part I

The Milky Way
Sits high above
Mountain country,
Illuminating
Villages below.
Stardust falls
Earthbound,
Until, frozen,
It becomes
White snowflakes
That shroud the ground,
Two meters deep.
My hands reach out
Towards the winter sky,
Hoping I might catch
A star in each hand.
For a moment,
They’re in my grasp.
I adore them
Like they’re lovers
That I can keep.
My desire doesn't
Require that
I make a choice.
Sometimes, it’s true,
You can have both.
But the angry fire
In my selfish heart
Melts my lovi
...more
Parthiban Sekar
The life of an individual, which is filled with Emptiness, is like an after-hours station which is otherwise full of people and events. The stillness of hours and the quietude of place can seem quite intriguing to an arriving traveler. But, for a passing traveler, it would merely seem like a futile existence. The void of the station forlornly awaits the speed of any passing train whose fleeting presence can enliven the station even for just few moments. Such is the life of Komako, a provincial g ...more
Florencia
Apr 25, 2016 Florencia rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: japanese
[ ]

description

description

Bashō's evocative haiku is referenced by the end of the book, as one of the characters contemplates small drops of fire that, in contrast to the quiet atmosphere of a country made of snow, were floating in the air, ablaze with fury and disenchantment, sheltered by the absolute splendour of the Milky Way. The sublimeness of a firmament under which existence manifests itself in the shape of beauty and sadness.
As always, Bashō depicted an entire universe in three lines. Trifling matter
...more
Jenn(ifer)
May 18, 2012 Jenn(ifer) rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: the pure of heart
Recommended to Jenn(ifer) by: vincent van gogh


New love is as delicate as the wings of a moth.

I try to write but the words disintegrate between my fingertips. They melt like snow on my tongue. Maybe a light breeze could carry them across the ocean and drop them at your feet. They will slip through your fingers like sand. They will drift through the air like dandelion wishes.

New love is as fleeting as the blossoms of an almond tree.

The words might cut you like the sharp edge of this paper. The tiny cuts will sting. They buzz around your ear
...more
Richard Derus
Rating: 3.5* of five

The Publisher Says: Nobel Prize winner Yasunari Kawabata’s Snow Country is widely considered to be the writer’s masterpiece: a powerful tale of wasted love set amid the desolate beauty of western Japan.

At an isolated mountain hot spring, with snow blanketing every surface, Shimamura, a wealthy dilettante meets Komako, a lowly geisha. She gives herself to him fully and without remorse, despite knowing that their passion cannot last and that the affair can have only one outcome
...more
B0nnie
Oct 22, 2012 B0nnie rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An image of a young woman reflected in the window of a train. A man watches her. Snow Country opens with a strange, beautiful scene which sets up the story, and leaves hints at what is to follow,
A woman’s eye floated up before him. He almost called out in his astonishment. But he had been dreaming, and when he came to himself he saw that it was only the reflection in the window of the girl opposite. Outside it was growing dark, and the lights had been turned on in the train, transforming the wi
...more
Praj
Aug 25, 2013 Praj rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: yk, にほん


Butterflies.....
Amusing the lotus pond
A child’s delight.


Butterflies dab my tears and lotuses kiss my heart. As a child, I used to spend hours gazing the dainty beauties as they flirted with the boisterous flowers. Amid my hearty giggles, the soft buttery wings browsed my cheeks for a pink watermark. I sought to embrace these coquettish insects as I sat on the wet grass. As I lifted one from its flowering sojourn and laid it on my palms, my eyes lit like the time my mother cuddled me after a ba
...more
Cheryl
Gray, the color of loneliness and dissatisfaction, of a heart torn by guilt and shame. Long, gray winters and snow-covered mountains, snow as high as his knees, snow to bury his secret rendezvous. Gray, the color a person sees, when he thinks the grass is greener elsewhere. Black and white forms gray in Kawabata's fictional creation, where the mountains are "black," but "brilliant with the color of the snow." Perhaps gray is the color of unrequited love, or of "wasted effort."
He was conscious o
...more
Mariel
Apr 02, 2011 Mariel rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: northern lights
Recommended to Mariel by: sky phenomenon
I read the other reviews of Snow Country before I read the book. I'm nervous to look at any more right now, before I begin writing my own review (erm technically I'm writing it right now). It's like when you mishear lyrics in a song and find out the line that killed you wasn't what they were singing at all. Lights turned on and it's not as beautiful when it's the real world in day time? So the introductions I've read... I didn't read Snow Country as a love triangle. I don't want to.

Yukio Mishim
...more
Tony
May 11, 2013 Tony rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: japanese
I view Asian Art through Western eyes. Not that I have a choice, I guess. That process enhances, even as it limits.

description


I love the beauty, the intricacy of Japanese woodblock prints, but I fear I’m seeing them superficially. Am I missing something, I wonder, if only a nuance? And Murakami. Even though his works owe much to Bulgakov and The Beatles, there is a descent from Japanese forerunners and the history and culture of those islands that probably – okay, certainly - eludes me.

Once an artist hits
...more
Eddie Watkins
Sep 29, 2014 Eddie Watkins rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: japanese-fiction
This is the story of three different trips by Shimamura up into the Snow Country of Japan. Each trip occurs in a different season, and each in turn reflects his deepening involvement with a country geisha in a small village. While journeying by train there for his second visit he is struck by the beauty of a fellow passenger who by chance is traveling to the same village. As Shimamura gets more deeply involved, at least physically, with the geisha, he remains deeply intrigued by the other woman. ...more
Paquita Maria Sanchez
Dec 05, 2014 Paquita Maria Sanchez rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: literature
In slow motion until the point of contact, this novella quite simply and mercilessly spends its energy reserves back-handing you with the its last few pages. I am getting ahead of myself, but it is important that you know this fact. I hear a lot of trash talked on Japanese novels and films from time to time (excluding those centering on martial arts, of course), of how they are slow, simple, boring, plotless, and where are the explosions, anyway? Well...

First off, I think that's a lot of hooey.
...more
Algernon
Apr 04, 2016 Algernon rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, 2016
- The snow is that deep?
- They say that in the next town up the line the schoolchildren jump naked from the second floor of the dormitory. They sink out of sight in the snow, and they move around under it as though they were swimming.


A train rushes into the evening, away from the city, toward a distant country, over the mountains, where winter snows are so high people dig tunnels to move from one side of the street to the other and telegraph poles are buried right up to the wires. Here are hot
...more
RK-ique
Mar 15, 2016 RK-ique rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, kawabata
"In the depths of the mirror the evening landscape moved by, the mirror and the reflected figures like motion pictures superimposed one on the other. The figures and the background were unrelated, and yet the figures, transparent and intangible, and the background, dim in the gathering darkness, melted together into a sort of symbolic world not of this world. Particularly when a light out in the mountains shone in the center of the girl’s face, Shimamura felt his chest rise at the inexpressible ...more
Jibran
Apr 21, 2015 Jibran rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, nobel, japanese
A metaphor of rotting and unappreciated beauty. Deep in the frozen reaches of the Snow Country a Geisha waits out her days for a man who would give her a life of love and dignity that she believes is her right.

Geishas in the Japanese society were connoisseurs of culture and art; they exerted political influence through their patrons; they decided the fates of people who desired their services; they made and broke marriages – they were a soft power centre in the Japanese society.

But in the backwa
...more
João Fernandes
Oct 18, 2015 João Fernandes rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nobel
description
(Mt. Fuji, Japan)

"It was a stern night landscape. The sound of the freezing of snow over the land seemed to roar deep into the earth. There was no moon. The stars, almost too many to be true, came forward so brightly that it was as if they were falling with the swiftness of the void."

'Snow Country' has one of the most beautifully descriptive proses I've read. It is a lot like the snow it spends so much time on: an intrinsic feeling of purity and truth runs in Kawabata's words, and the picture
...more
Nandakishore Varma
Most of my friends from Kerala would be familiar with the film Thoovanathumbikal by the famous Malayalam writer and director P. Padmarajan. The film narrates the story of the love of a young-man-about-town, Jayakrishnan, for two girls: Radha, a prim-and-proper Indian miss and Clara, a prostitute. Padmarajan uses the two women as symbols for two facets of femininity (and therefore, of life) - one light and chaste and the other dark and mysterious. I was reminded of this movie all the time while r ...more
brian
Jan 01, 2008 brian rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
at tosh's prodding i'd been on something of a japanese kick in '07, burned through mishima, dazai, tanizaki, murakami, etc. -- when deciding which kawabata to tackle, charles forwarded an interview in which vollmann mentioned snow country as in his all-time top ten. well, i read it on the flight from florida to california and stumbled off that plane utterly & totally flattened. snow country. whew. snow country. sad and enigmatic and spare and packed with some of the most odd & lyrical im ...more
Maru Kun
I started to read this in Japanese. It's certainly a trickier read than anything by Haruki Murakami, who is pretty easy to work through so great practice for intermediate students of Japanese.

Well, life is too short and to save time I switched to this, the Seidensticker translation. Unfortunately the translation is quite poor. It doesn't flow like the original; a lot of the original poetry is lost as a result of limited vocabulary and general clumsiness of expression. Not sure if there are any b
...more
Nidhi Singh
Apr 14, 2014 Nidhi Singh rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: japan, 2014, nobel
In the depths of the mirror the evening landscape moved by, the mirror and the reflected figures like motion pictures superimposed one on the other. The figures and the background were unrelated, and yet the figures, transparent and intangible, and the background, dim in the gathering darkness, melted into a sort of symbolic world not of this world. Particularly when a light out in the mountains shone in the centre of the girl's face, Shimamura felt his chest rise at the inexpressible beauty of ...more
Nick
Feb 07, 2008 Nick rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Let it be known that this is a terrible translation. I am convinced that I would have enjoyed this book ten times as much if someone other than Edward Seidensticker had bothered to translate it. My reasoning? Kawabata's Palm-of-the-Hand Stories is one best collections of short stories I have ever read. In the back of that book is "Gleanings from Snow Country," the last work Kawabata wrote before he died. It is a condensation of the novel in question. Remarkably, it is not even a rewriting but r ...more
بثينة العيسى
من خلال الجلد الناعم الرقيق عرفَ الإنسان الحب.

- كاواباتا
Sarah
Feb 05, 2008 Sarah rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
i was a bit disappointed with this, especially if it's one of kawabata's more celebrated (or just famous?) books, or one of his break-out books, and since he is a nobel winner. his prose is lovely, but i felt like i was watching a very tactful and well-mannered movie from the 50s where they divert your attention to nice scenery shots or where they only show the actors' legs when they're kissing. the narrative skipped forward so much that it was hard to stay oriented, and the aforementioned allus ...more
Steven
Apr 09, 2016 Steven rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favourites
Steeped in Japanese tradition Nobel prize winner Yasunari Kawabata has created something almost otherworldly, like it belongs in a completely different time and place. Shimamura travels from the city to a village in the snowy mountains, and while in the company of a young rural geisha called Komako a strange love blossoms, but bound to the rules of the geisha Komako struggles with her emotions towards him and there is always a sense that sadness lingers . The snowy setting really captures the im ...more
Carla

“Foi então que uma luz longínqua resplandeceu naquele rosto. No jogo dos reflexos, ao fundo do espelho, a imagem não se impunha com a consistência suficiente para eclipsar o brilho da luz, mas tão pouco era incerta ao ponto de desaparecer debaixo dela. E Shimamura seguiu a luz que caminhava lentamente sobre o rosto sem o perturbar. Uma fria cintilação perdida na distância. E quando o seu brilho reduzido veio reacender-se sobre a pupila da mulher, quando se sobrepuseram e se confundiram o brilho
...more
Anh
Sep 08, 2012 Anh rated it really liked it
Shelves: fiction
Vẫn phong cách quen thuộc của Kawabata. Truyện nhạt,có lẽ nhất là với những ai quen đọc văn học Nhật qua các tiểu thuyết của Murakami. Thêm nữa là diễn biến tâm lý các nhân vật trong truyện của ông thường có phần khó hiểu.
Tuy nhiên Kawabata lại là một nhà văn mình rất yêu thích và chưa có tác phẩm nào của ông làm mình thất vọng. Tác phẩm của ông luôn rất đẹp và vô cùng tinh tế. Một cái đẹp u buồn, hoài niệm. Một thế giới ảo ảnh, mơ hồ. Nói như vậy nghe thật sáo rỗng và giả tạo quá mức ( có phần
...more
Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly
This book was supposed to have been written from 1934 to 1947. The principal protagonist, a married man named Shimamura, is the prototype of the modern Japanese sex tourist. Once in a while, without his family, he goes to a place in Japan where snow falls the heaviest [the "Snow Country"] so he can have sex with geishas.

If this is made into a movie, it would be better that this be in a black and white film, the scenes always dark and cold, like Shimamura himself, who does not seem to be capable
...more
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Armenian readers ...: Կարդում ենք Նոբելյան մրցանակակիր Կավաբատային 36 45 Oct 10, 2015 04:18AM  
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PNWJETAA Book Club: Snow Country 1 22 Aug 12, 2012 10:51PM  
  • Some Prefer Nettles
  • The Three-Cornered World
  • The Wild Geese
  • The Setting Sun
  • The Waiting Years
  • Runaway Horses
  • A Dark Night's Passing (Japan's Modern Writers)
  • Rivalry: A Geisha's Tale
  • The Silent Cry
  • The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories
  • Tales of Moonlight and Rain
  • Rashomon and Other Stories
  • Black Rain
8550
Yasunari Kawabata (川端 康成) was a Japanese short story writer and novelist whose spare, lyrical, subtly-shaded prose works won him the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1968, the first Japanese author to receive the award. His works have enjoyed broad international appeal and are still widely read.

Nobel Lecture: 1968
http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prize...
More about Yasunari Kawabata...

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“As he caught his footing, his head fell back, and the Milky Way flowed down inside him with a roar.” 810 likes
“But even more than her diary, Shimamura was surprised at her statement that she had carefully cataloged every novel and short story she had read since she was fifteen or sixteen. The record already filled ten notebooks.
"You write down your criticisms, do you?"
"I could never do anything like that. I just write down the author and the characters and how they are related to each other. That is about all."
"But what good does it do?"
"None at all."
"A waste of effort."
"A complete waste of effort," she answered brightly, as though the admission meant little to her. She gazed solemnly at Shimamura, however.
A complete waste of effort. For some reason Shimamura wanted to stress the point. But, drawn to her at that moment, he felt a quiet like the voice of the rain flow over him. He knew well enough that for her it was in fact no waste of effort, but somehow the final determination that it had the effect of distilling and purifying the woman's existence.”
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