Artificial Epidemics: How Medical Activism Has Inflated the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer and Depression
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Artificial Epidemics: How Medical Activism Has Inflated the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer and Depression

3.11 of 5 stars 3.11  ·  rating details  ·  9 ratings  ·  2 reviews
“Early detection” has become a cardinal principle of medical treatment in our time. But how effective is it in controlling two conditions that have reached near-epidemic proportions in the United States—prostate cancer and depression?

In this trenchant appraisal of what he calls medical activism, Stewart Justman describes how the quest for early detection has led to mass sc...more
Kindle Edition, 22 pages
Published January 23rd 2012 by Now and Then Reader, LLC
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Damaskcat
This article puts forward the theory that screening for some diseases creates an artificial idea of their prevalence. The author discusses this issue with relevance to America but a similar situation applies in the UK. Diagnosing and treating people for diseases which cause no symptoms and which may never kill them may not be such a good idea as was first thought. Early diagnosis may not be the best thing if the resulting treatment causes more harm to the individual than leaving the disease untr...more
Michael
Somehow I think he might be a crackpot
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