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3.79 of 5 stars 3.79  ·  rating details  ·  1,367 ratings  ·  153 reviews
Eisner Award winner SCOTT SNYDER (Batman, Swamp Thing, American Vampire), Scott Tuft & NYT Best-Selling-Artist Attila Futaki (The Lightning Thief) bring you the complete collected hardcover of the scariest horror comic of the year, SEVERED.

1916. A man haunts the roads; a man with sharp teeth and a hunger for flesh. When 12 year-old Jack Garron runs away from home, he'l
Hardcover, 192 pages
Published April 11th 2012 by Image Comics
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Gotta give a shout-out to Kat for providing these friggin' awesome banners for our shallow comic buddy-reads. You just keep killin'it home-girl.


Well, not my favorite Scott Snyder book. I’m sure not being a “horror” guy didn’t help. Just not my bag. But it was still a decent read and overall I enjoyed it. Scott Snyder and Scott Tuft put their own spin on the serial killer genre with this one. Severed did have some genuine tension in a scene involving a bear trap and, like Mike, the beginning of c
A Major Disappointment

Scott Snyder is no hack. His stories are carefully mapped out, his characters developed with purpose and patience, his dialogues competently written (if a bit clichéd in places). He generally knows how to set a mood, how to transition from one scene to the next, how to create effective cliffhangers. All this is evident in Severed, Snyder’s stand-alone horror-suspense story set in 1916, and it is even complimented with appropriately dark, realistically rendered artwork by At
The first thing that struck me was the mood this book sets. Between the sparse narration (explicit foreshadowing), the relative innocence of the young characters and the painted, rich look of the art, it's hard not to get immersed in an old-timey (not Powell's The Goon, more like Norman Rockwell), relaxed atmosphere.

I first encountered Snyder with Iron Man Noir, and I thought he was being entirely too clever for himself there. In this book, the writing voice seems entirely natural and consistent
Sam Quixote
America, 1916, and 13 year old Jack Garron is running away from his adopted mother’s home in search of his biological father, a fiddler who abandoned him as a baby. But there is a monster in a suit, the Nightmare, who is stalking him as he stalks all children he wants to eat and Jack is next up on the menu...

Scott Snyder steps out of DC and teams up with long-time friend Scott Tuft and artist extraordinaire Attilla Futaki to craft a riveting horror story set on the lonely roads and abandoned co
Alex Scales
Here's a prime example of the sort of shit I hate in comics: The generic, by-the-numbers script, with the same old horror tropes and no attempt to break from them, illustrated by a competent artist that doesn't even get enough chances at showing off his talent. But hey, it's Scott Snyder, so of course the guys down at the comic shop love to sing hymns and sacrifice goats over this one since HE CAN DO NO WRONG. The final result is an incredibly safe comic that doesn't take any chances, and tries ...more
What I really liked about this book is the way the tension/suspense is built up, drawing the readers in from the first pages and sucking them in further and further as the story progresses. Then you reach this point in the book where you're wondering "How the hell is our protagonist going to get out of this ?"

Billed as a horror comic, the only "horror" element (as in "fantastical") to it is at the very end. The rest of the book, say all but the last few pages, is a different kind of horror - the
Sumit Singla
Severed was a short, quick read. It was fast-paced, with a creepy atmosphere. The fact that the story is set in 1916 adds an extra dimension of mystery, somehow. I quite enjoyed the artwork, and the overall buildup of the storyline. The story certainly brings to life some childhood fears, and is creepy enough to remind you of the likes of the Boogeyman and Pennywise the Clown.

However, I wouldn't rate it too highly because of the anticlimactic ending. Overall, I thought Scott Snyder could have d
Callie Rose Tyler
Thoroughly enjoyable. This horror comic starts out a bit sluggish but really picks up, the last few chapters are full of thrills, suspense, and violence.

I loved the 1915 time period and the art was fantastic, both worked together to create a interesting tone and unique story.

Most of this story was told in flashback which didn't really work as well as it could have. Despite this being a quick read I had completely forgotten that the first few pages took place decades after the main story, so when
This would make a great movie.. hint, hint!
William Thomas
Scott Snyder is the newest king in comic books. With the success of American Vampire and his work on Batman, as well as Swamp Thing, it was only a matter of time before we saw him put out something subpar. Well, subpar in comparison to his other work. And Severed is just that.

As a story, Severed works wonders. It combines all of the classic elements of horror and horror masters like Matheson and Bierce and King. Snyder sets an even tone from the start and creates a horror not out of a supernatu

Severed will always be a missed opportunity for me.

Snyder has the ability to sell me story twice : once through comic, and second time in afterward/preview piece when he writes about how he got inspiration, central theme,some anecdote from his life. He has a great pitch works for me. Cue to his latest, Wytches #1.
In Severed, we learn, that creative team was after "primal fear, rooted in reality."

Setting and killer who tricks children in order to eat them, I assume, is loosely based on
First of all, the art was amazing. I really loved Futaki's work in this, especially in the scene with Jack and Sam sitting on the metal bars of the construction site, with the city skyline in the background. It was gorgeous! Overall, I thought it was a good read, but I didn't find it scary enough. Maybe I'm being too picky after reading Locke & Key, but this one definitely wasn't as good as that series. I appreciated the ending, though, it was definitely very creepy!
Randolph Carter
I had high hopes for this but it turns out to be only a so-so horror book. A vampire story with a cannibal twist. Unfortunately the basic story is revealed on the cover blurb and the "surprise" ending is telegraphed in the first two pages. The cover art was outstanding but the interior artwork overall I thought was just average. Futaki went for a period feel that left the colors, even the blood, mostly muted with more browns and sepias. The detail wasn't particularly interesting and I found myse ...more
Jeremy DeBottis
Simply put, this book kept me on the edge of my seat and was one of the hardest things to have to put down and wait to pick back up between reads I've read in quite some time. It continues to build and build and continually add suspense that reaches extreme heights. If you're reading this review you should stop right now and go read Severed instead (although this is the last sentence of the review so if you want to give these parentheses a shot in hopes that they may add some extra wonder to the ...more
Michelle Morrell
Spooky and sad and gross and heartbreaking, all in turn. The art was quite dark in places, which was obviously appropriate according to the story, but still a little hard at times to figure out what was happening.
Paul Dinger
I go way back with horror comics. When I was a youngster, I couldn't get enough of them from Ripely's Believe it or Not, Witching Hour, House of Mystery, etc. One of the many faults of the current comic industry has been an overreliance on superheros and not enough on good old fashioned scary books. This is a welcome comeback to those days. I really enjoyed how this was put togather with a true sense of creeping terror. Synder is a master, as American Vampire shows of creating this dread. Hopefu ...more
Dan Domme
Severed is a recommendation that was given to me because I was looking for a good horror story in the comic book shop. What I had originally wanted was a Lovecraft-style story that was a bit more tied to the “weird” genre, and Severed doesn’t really fit what I was looking for at the time. It is, however, a good nearly-realistic horror tale: gritty, bloody with some decently suspenseful moments.

I do feel this was a worthwhile read, although it also left a bit to be desired. There are only a few m
Egemen Ertürk
First of all, THAT HARDCOVER MAAAAN! Easily the best case i have ever seen on a comic book, now that aside, i checked severed on goodreads and was not satisfied with its score and thinking "the wake" which i recently read and reviewed, was about to pass this one, until i saw, that HARDCOVEEEER. So i judged a book by its cover and it delivered. Kinda.
Lets start. Panels: easy to follow and crystal clear. Art: Pulls you right the F in and makes you feel like you are there. Story: was great, create
Rory Wilding
Having established himself as a writer in horror through comic books such as American Vampire and The Wake, current Batman writer Scott Snyder co-wrote this horror gem with Scott Tuft for Image Comics.

1916. Twelve-year old Jack Garron, who is practising the fiddle, travels to Chicago in search of his father. During the course of his journey, during which he is in partnership with another young hobo Sam, Jack becomes the target of who he calls: The Nightmare.

For those who familiar with the litera
Giovanni Faga
(Quattro * nella scala "comics", eh?)

Severed è una serie di 7 numeri pubblicata dalla Image nel 2011. Qui, l'intera serie è raccolta in un volume della Panini ben curato nella stampa e nella rilegatura.

Severed è una storia inquietante, che racconta del viaggio disperato di un ragazzino alla ricerca del padre attraverso un'America violenta e spietata. L'America dei primi anni del secolo scorso, in preda alla furia di un capitalismo troppo giovane, diventa lo scenario per una storia horror davver
I read this novel because of the title - SEVERED.

What can I say? It's another graphic novel about a supernatural serial killer. It takes place around World War I and it involves runaway children.

The story is fairly simple, three stars worth, I guess, I didn't find it all that scary, but then again I am pretty jaded when it comes to horror. And frankly I would have easily given it a pass, but...

The art is amazing, this was the first I'd seen by this Attila Futaki guy, but hopefully I'll be seeing more of his work in the future.
New contender for best all-time graphic novel. Awesome. Creepy. Horror comic FTW. Scott Snyder does great work on Batman (The Black Mirror possibly being my fav graphic novel of all-time) and now stuff like this. Too cool, Freddy-like character and haunting visuals that can chill you. Enjoyed the HELL out of this.
Gunes Demirel
Scott Snyder'ın imza attığı bütün çizgi romanlar gibi güzeldi. 12 yaşındaki Jack, babasını aramak için evden kaçar ama kendini hiç tanımadığı yabancı bir dünyada bulur. Bir çocuk avcısı peşine takılır ve kâbus başlar... Fazla spoiler vermek istemiyorum, devam edersem hepsini anlayacağım:) Hikâye ve kurgu sağlam. Ben ayakları yere basan korku hikâyelerini vampir ve kurt adam türevlerinden daha çok seviyorum. Bu da onlardan biri.

Eleştireceğim tek bir nokta var: Attila Futaki'nin çizimlerini çok b
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I enjoyed the setting and thought the pacing was solid...I just couldn't really get into it. Characters development wasn't as strong as I hoped it'd be for a Snyder piece.
I love Scott Snyder. But I did not so much love this book.

The idea itself reflects some of the twisted Americana that Snyder explored in American Vampire, which I liked, but there was something that I couldn't quite jive with as I was reading. Now that I'm thinking about it, I think my problem was with the antagonist--he was a bit too much like Pennywise the Clown for me.

Attila Futaki's artwork is perfect for the story though. His artwork perfectly captures that dusty, depression-era America (i
it's weird that I don't have a "horror" shelf yet on goodreads.
Edward Sullivan
Great horror story, creepy, grim, and grotesque.
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Scott Snyder is the Eisner and Harvey Award winning writer on DC Comics Batman, Swamp Thing, and his original series for Vertigo, American Vampire. He is also the author of the short story collection, Voodoo Heart, published by the Dial Press in 2006. The paperback version was published in the summer of 2007.
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