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Whose Science? Whose Knowledge?: Thinking from Women's Lives

3.61  ·  Rating Details  ·  54 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
Sandra Harding here develops further the themes first addressed in her widely influential book, The Science Question in Feminism, and conducts a compelling analysis of feminist theories on the philosophical problem of how we know what we know.Following a strong narrative line, Harding sets out her arguments in highly readable prose. In Part 1, she discusses issues that wil ...more
Paperback, 336 pages
Published May 7th 1991 by Cornell University Press (first published January 1st 1991)
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Dr. A
Oct 17, 2014 Dr. A rated it really liked it
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Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of www.BestPhilosophyBooks.org (a thinkPhilosophy Production).
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One of the first book-length treatments of feminist epistemologies, this is still the place where a certain terrain is mapped for the future of feminist contributions to discourses on knowledge and science studies. It is even more striking, this time around, how dated the political assumptions of a democratic and liberal society that motivates thi
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Shanamadele
Jun 01, 2007 Shanamadele rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: thinking people
Oh, it's been a long time! Science and knowledge are social constructs, and the way they have been constructed in Western culture is largely uniformed by women's experiences.
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