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Midway To Heaven
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Midway To Heaven

3.23 of 5 stars 3.23  ·  rating details  ·  815 ratings  ·  149 reviews

What father ever thinks his little girl is ready to get married? Ned Stevens is convinced that his future son-in-law is too perfect. Athletic, good-looking, musical, spiritual . . . nobody could be that good. Ned is sure there's something fishy about this boy his daughter seems so crazy about. He just has to find out what it is before it's too late. But how far will he go

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Hardcover, 225 pages
Published December 2003 by Shadow Mountain
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Nolan
Ned Stevens is busy putting the pieces of his life together after the death of his wife. Most of the kids are grown, but Liz is unmarried and a student at BYU. That's all about to change one fateful Thanksgiving when Liz announces that she's bringing a guy home. Dear old Dad is anything but happy about this. He realizes, with help from the voice of his deceased wife that plays in his head, that he has become hugely dependent on his unmarried 20-year-old daughter, and he's not anxious to see that...more
Beth
I love just about everything by Dean Hughes, and this book is no exception. I read it the first time several years ago: I remember that I had loved it, that it was laugh-out-loud funny.

I bought a copy last summer, having found it on the clearance table at my local Deseret Book, but I kept this book on my shelf for a few months, preoccupied with other reading. I finally picked this up a couple days ago as my reward for finishing a much meatier book … and then I subsequently devoured it. The main...more
Cindi
May 30, 2011 Cindi rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2011
Review originally posted on my blog : http://utahmomslife.blogspot.com/2011...

Let me just start out by saying that I LOVED Dean Hughes's Children of Promise series. I've read them several times. I've made Utah Dad read them and my parents. They're really really good.

So, I had high hopes for Midway to Heaven, my neighborhood book club pick for May. After all, they made it into a movie.

I read the first chapter while I waited for Neal to get his bottom braces on at the orthodontist's office last we...more
Donna
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Stan
Straight up, this is not what I'd call "great literature." But in this case, that doesn't at all matter to me. I read it for entertainment, and that's exactly what I got--and in large, family-friendly quantities.

Though I'm not an anxious father dealing facing the prospect of losing his only daughter to marriage to "The Perfect Man," Hughes' "over-the-top" portrayal of Ned Stevens (the main character) is nicely done. It's the extremity to which Ned goes, throughout the book, that provides the bul...more
Kathryn
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Gretchen
I was really disappointed in this book! I loved Hughes' "Children of the Promise" and "Hearts of the Children" series so I was looking forward to reading something by him written in the present time. This was...not great. It was so dull in the beginning with the protagonist listing light all of the ridiculous reasons why he didn't like his daughter's new boyfriend and giving him obnoxious nicknames all ending in "boy" - "scenery-boy", "humility-boy", "fancy-clothes-boy", etc. After the boyfriend...more
Stan Crowe
While this is not what I'd call "great literature," it was fantastic entertainment, in large, family-friendly quantities.

Though I'm not an anxious father dealing facing the prospect of losing his only daughter to marriage to "The Perfect Man," Hughes' "over-the-top" portrayal of Ned Stevens (the main character) is nicely done. It's the extremity to which Ned goes, throughout the book, that provides the bulk of the comedy, and I think there probably are a good number of fathers who can relate to...more
Joni
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Mimi
This book centers around a widower and his 20 year old daughter. The widower left California (where his wife died of cancer) and moved to Midway and built their dream house. His 20 year old daughter attends BYU and visits him whenever she can. Since the death of their wife/mother, the two have grown very close. Everything changes though, when both begin new relationships with other people.

The book deals with grief, young love, love after death or divorce, retirement, and hasty judgments. While i...more
Kristen
This book had potential to be a cute, heartwarming story with some charm. However, I was sorely disappointed in it. Halfway through I kept asking myself why I was continuing to read it. I have read other books by Dean Hughes and enjoyed them a lot. This one, however, was just too over the top in terms of cheesiness. It was so unrealistic that I couldn't really take it seriously. It's too bad because I think it wrestles a topic that a lot of people can relate to. (Father daughter relationships, a...more
Brooke
bah. Ned is annoying. end of story. This book was long and drawn out and the main character was petty and obnoxious. I get the point Dean Hughes was trying to get across, I get that, but I just couldn't stand him. And then, after all of this long, drawn out business about the daughter and the guy she already knew she'd marry he finally starts to date and he meets a lady and things are moving along and then all of a sudden it cuts to Christmas eve and we're given less than a paragraph overview of...more
Angie
Kinda cheesy, and the movie was even cheesier. This was an okay story, not very plausible, and the whole time I just wanted to shake the main character and tell him to stop freaking out. It got frustrating. Read if you don't have anything else on your nightstand.
Susan Hatch
I saw this title listed as a DVD but Netflix didn't have it...opted to read it and luckily Cleveland Library system did have it. I think that today I just needed a bit of fluff. And it was nice fluff...and honest fluff. I think altho I worked hard at putting up a good front when each of my children married, I was secretly dreading losing them.

And when it comes to the possibility of having my husband die on me, I am certain I will remain a widow. But I am equally as certain that if I die, he most...more
Erin
LDS fiction. This is my first foray into that particular genre. It takes place in northern Utah and makes all sorts of fun references to familiar places which was fun. The story was enjoyable but I wanted to smack the main character several times. It made me glad that we don't have any daughters because I worry John would react the same way when she started dating. However, it was an interesting commentary on the stages of grief and also the Mormon take and how it feels to consider remarriage af...more
Erin
A funny story about a recently widowed father coming to terms with the inevitable marriage of his daughter to a guy he doesn't like. His major objection: the guy is too perfect. Since it's been a while since I've listened to a Dean Hughes novel, I'd forgotten how passionate, excitable, and dramatic his characters can be. I feel like they often go a little over-the-top, but I guess that's what makes the stories interesting. I had a hard time understanding exactly what was going on during the golf...more
Tethergirl30
What a cute story!! Overprotective father and a little bit of romance. Perfect.
Julia
I didn't particularly enjoy this Dean Hughes writing style. It seemed to simple to me and the story line itself seemed very serious. The change that the father has to go through is remarkable. He has to learn to not be so dependent upon his daughter, and to realize that it is possible to find love after love has died. Liz, the daughter, also learns that she needs to have her own life and to not push her dad away completely but to be an independent person and marry who she thinks is the right per...more
Katie Watkins
This book reminded me a lot of "Father of the Bride." Ned is a widower in his early 50s and his youngest child (and only girl) brings home a guy for Thanksgiving. Ned flips out and tries his best to discourage the relationship. I thought parts of it were funny, but that parts of it were kind of sad. I've had family members who's spouses have passed away and they're alone for a long time. I felt bad for Ned--he's lonely and trying to figure out what to do with his life and he clings (almost too m...more
Becky
I was really excited to find this book by Dean Hughes because I loved his Children of the Promise series that I read years ago. But I was disappointed with this novel. I thought it was really slow and actually cheesy- talking about the relationship between a father & his daughter at BYU. Not that their relationship was cheesy, just the way it was written. It had a positive ending, and finally picked up the last couple of chapters. All in all, it was just o.k. If anyone likes Dean Hughes, I w...more
David Barney
sweet story of love and accepting changes in life.
Julie
Basically, the story was flat and underdeveloped and the characters were totally unlikable. Ned finally managed to become a dynamic character, but only after acting like a total jerk and the transformation from jerk to decent father was pretty much unexplored. His eventual relationship with Carol was left unfinished which was totally annoying. All in all, this is not one that I will bother to read again, and I would suggest to anyone who is interested in a well developed story with engaging lika...more
Kay
Cuties quick read. Heart warming, not a hard read. Recommend
Sarah
This book bored me, and I probably read it at the absolute worst time in my life to read it, everyone in this book was wealthy and beautiful and everything was perfect without any trials, even the "hardships" were so easy they made me want to puke meanwhile I have none of these things the people in the book are just taking for granted as if everyone is retired at 50 with a gorgeous house or like his daughter beautiful, ridiculously young, and engaged to God's most perfectly created single young...more
Steve
Picked this one up as a free eBook download from Deseret Book. As I'm fond of saying, you rarely get more than what you paid for. A quick read, so the price in time wasn't enough to kick it over the "too expensive for what you get" threshold. The characters were too unreal for my taste and the main character was basically a self-centered jerk whom the author still portrayed as somehow really a great person. So although the book was well-intentioned, it just didn't deliver for me.
Kristen
It's kind of a love story of sorts... a clean LDS novel with great characters. The story is a bit cheesy at times, but not so much that I didn't like reading. The father/daughter relationship is kind of intense but I've never dealt with a death like they had to, so I can't say if it was abnormal or not. I guess you lean on whomever you feel closest to in situations like that. But the story isn't about death. It's about moving on with life after tragedy.

Elaine
Oct 26, 2009 Elaine rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Aunt Annette
Shelves: romance, mormon
I thought most of the book was okay but about 3/4 of the way through, I started liking it more.

Ned is struggling with his daughter Liz' relationship with David. He's looking (to the extreme) for faults with this guy. So much so that he's getting himself in trouble with others. Liz handles his actions rather well. Ned's fortunate in that. To Liz, David is perfect. To Ned, too perfect and he's bound and determined to discover why that is.
Corinne
I was surprised this book was being made into a movie. It doesn't really seem movie material.

A dad who is so sad at the loss of his wife he has a hard time meeting his daughter's boyfriend. I feel for the characters but after a few chapters I seriously was wondering if the dad actually needed to be seeing someone who could prescribe him medication for his actions.

Overall I felt MEH about this book.

Janell
Is it possible for the final, concluding paragraph of a book to drop its rating? Absolutely YES!

However . . . fairly cute story, fairly likable characters but a very abrupt and choppy conclusion. And, of course, the final unsatisfying paragraph! (I even turned the page hoping to find some other conclusion but no luck.) Of course, I've seen the movie so perhaps that influenced my decision :-)
Alysia
We listened to this book on CD on a trip and it was very enjoyable. It's the story of a man who can't let go of his youngest daughter after losing his wife to cancer, and therefore is convinced that the 'perfect' man she brings home for the holidays must not be as perfect as he appears. It was funny, sweet, and touching. Not life changing but an enjoyable LDS fiction 'read.'
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6421982
Dean Hughes is the author of more than eighty books for young readers, including the popular sports series Angel Park All-Stars, the Scrappers series, the Nutty series, the widely acclaimed companion novels Family Pose and Team Picture, and Search and Destroy. Soldier Boys was selected for the 2001 New York Public Library Books for the Teen Age list. Dean Hughes and his wife, Kathleen, have three...more
More about Dean Hughes...
Rumors of War (Children of the Promise, #1) When We Meet Again (Children of the Promise, #4) As Long As I Have You (Children of the Promise, #5) Since You Went Away (Children of the Promise, #2) Far From Home (Children of the Promise, #3)

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