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The Man Who Made Maniacs
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The Man Who Made Maniacs

did not like it 1.0  ·  Rating Details ·  1 Rating  ·  1 Review
Jace Reid had felt the impact of the bullet. He had remembered falling face-down into the dirt. The next thing he knew, he was reading about his own death, lying on a bed in an institution for the insane. It had started with a picture of himself making love to a girl, and a threatening phone call - then his own death. The police had the body. There could be no doubt it was ...more
Paperback, 155 pages
Published 1961 by Epic Books
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Nick Cato
Dec 19, 2011 Nick Cato rated it did not like it
I picked up this 1961 pulp novel looking for some kitschy fun, but unlike a few other pulp/exploitation novels I've read from this era, THE MAN WHO MADE MANIACS was just plain horrible.

Jace Reid is a Hollywood screenwriter whose life is turned upside down when someone tries to frame him...but with what is never quite clear. There's doctored photos of him with a woman with "big baloozas," and we eventually discover an underground sadism cult considers him their master. In one scene Jace is shot i
...more
Brandon
Brandon marked it as to-read
Sep 09, 2013
Carla Naomi
Carla Naomi marked it as to-read
Jun 06, 2015
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James Judson Harmon, aka Jim Harmon (born 1933), was an American short story author and popular culture historian who has written extensively about the Golden Age of Radio. He sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Judson Grey, and occasionally he was labeled Mr. Nostalgia.
More about Jim Harmon...

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