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You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo
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You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo

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3.17  ·  Rating Details ·  12 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo looks at the world of extinct and endangered species. In easy-to-understand language, Fred Ehrlich covers dinosaurs, extinct birds and mammals, and endangered animals, giving clear and concise explanations of what happened to them. Punctuated with humorous verse to emphasize points and illustrated with whimsical cartoons, it's a book packed ...more
Hardcover, 40 pages
Published July 1st 2011 by Blue Apple Books (first published 2005)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-22)
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Caterpickles
The Five-Year-Old enjoyed this book more than I did. I was put off by the illustrations and Comic Sans-like font. But she didn’t mind those and focused on the content, soaking up everything Ehrlich would tell her about the various animals and why they are either endangered or extinct. And that’s something this book is really rather good at.
Louise (A Strong Belief in Wicker)
I really like the premise of this book. I think it's important to educate children about endangered species, habitat destruction and the dangers of feral animals. This book starts with the long extinct dinosaurs, then moves on to extinct birds such as the dodo and moa. It was in the endangered species chapter that our author (and illustrator) come a-cropper with some rather egregious errors that are very obvious to even a casual Australian reader. A Tasmanian Devil is not the same as a Tasmanian ...more
Natalie Brockmeier
This being my only informational book, I did enjoy it. I thought this book brought a really relatable approach to the idea of extinction, which too me seems to be a pretty abstract idea for students. I think that this book does a pretty good job of introducing these extinct animals and what happened to them.
I would use this book as part of an animal unit, specifically dinosaurs or other commonly known extinct animals. The enrichment aspect of this book comes in the read aloud when there are litt
...more
Shala Howell
My 4 yr old daughter enjoyed this book more than I did. I was put off by the illustrations and Comic Sans-like font. But she didn't mind those and focused on the content, soaking up everything Ehrlich would tell her about the various animals and why they are either endangered or extinct. Which this book is really rather good at.
Lynne Marie
Mar 16, 2016 Lynne Marie rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Really more like a chapter book than a picture book. Has fun poems, mini poems and info about super interesting extinct animals -- really fun and informative!
Sarah May
While I do not recommend the "science" in this book, it did start some interesting conversations with my 4-year old.
Immy C.
Immy C. rated it really liked it
Dec 26, 2016
Elaine
Elaine rated it liked it
Sep 15, 2016
Yi-ching
Yi-ching rated it liked it
Sep 22, 2007
Holly Wood
Holly Wood rated it liked it
Nov 02, 2013
Karen
Jul 21, 2011 Karen rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-again
Way too many words for my 3-year-old, but I would like to try it again around age 5 or 6.
Jun
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Jun 27, 2012
Angelina Constantine
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Feb 17, 2014
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Apr 11, 2015
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Wong Yan marked it as to-read
Nov 06, 2016
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Feb 13, 2017
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