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From the Kingdom of Memory: Reminiscences

4.09  ·  Rating Details ·  76 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
"One of the great writers of our generation" (The New Republic) weaves together memories of his life before the Holocaust and his great struggle to find meaning afterwards. Included are Wiesel's landmark speeches, among them his powerful testimony at the trial of Klaus Barbie and his 1986 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.
Paperback, 258 pages
Published January 31st 1995 by Schocken (first published 1990)
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Ross Cohen
Nov 18, 2016 Ross Cohen rated it it was amazing
A collection of speeches that display Wiesel's mastery of the spoken word and singular ability to find light in a broken darkness.
Taylor Church
Dec 27, 2014 Taylor Church rated it it was amazing
I started this book in search of literary inspiration. The manuscript I am working on needed some work, and I wanted literary nourishment to motivate and stretch my mind. This piece did exactly what I hoped it would. It is only the third book I have read from Elie Wiesel, but what a rich blessing. The amount underlined in this book makes it look more like a coloring book than a serious work of history, but my pen could not be held back. I would gift this book to anyone in search of something, ...more
Cat.
Jul 05, 2015 Cat. rated it it was amazing
I love Wiesel's words. The only problem with reading his books is that I don't want them to end. Even though this is a book of essays and speeches that were published decades ago, they remain telling and topical. After, nothing in history has changed--the Holocaust still destroyed his family--and, sadly, we still haven't learned how to stop hating.

I read this over the course of 7 months because I wanted to savor the words, listen to the stories of his childhood, and absorb the depth of each pag
...more
Emilie Frechie
Jun 12, 2012 Emilie Frechie rated it really liked it
My favorite essay out of this collection is "Making the Ghosts Speak." It is a coming-of-age essay that manages to focus on the post-traumatic stress and identity crisis that Wiesel experienced after surviving WWII, but the articulation of his unique experience of isolation, misery, and a yearning for connection are universal. I teach this every year as part of a coming-of-age unit in a nonfiction writing class, and the universality of his sentiment always moves me deeply, and especially because ...more
Pamela Detlor
Apr 06, 2012 Pamela Detlor rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Holocaust survivor/ Nobel Peace Prize winner Weisel’s collection of essays and speeches is incredibly uplifting. The book covers a range of topics; one of my favorites is the essay “Why I Write”. Wherein he says: “Why do I write? Perhaps in order not to go mad. Or, on the contrary, to touch the bottom of madness.” I read this book at age 21, each time I revisit I’m astounded by his wisdom. I learned a lot about what’s important in life from this man.
Mary
Dec 09, 2014 Mary rated it really liked it
An evocative, poignant collection of writings from our greatest living Jewish writer. This book is often painful to read, but all the same, the reader is grateful that Wiesel survived "the Kingdom of Night" to bring us these words.
Stacy
Jan 10, 2010 Stacy rated it liked it
Essays by Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor, philosopher, and author of Night. (An interesting story: Wiesel, also a Nobel Peace Prize winner, wrote to President Carter to congratulate him on winning the 2002 Nobel Peace Prize. The letter included the date and time – October 10, 2003, 5:00 AM!)
Marta
Feb 19, 2008 Marta rated it it was amazing
Love this quote:
Why do I write? Perhaps in order not to go mad. Or, on the contrary, to touch the bottom of madness. (p13)
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Eliezer Wiesel was a Romania-born American novelist, political activist, and Holocaust survivor of Hungarian Jewish descent. He was the author of over 40 books, the best known of which is Night, a memoir that describes his experiences during the Holocaust and his imprisonment in several concentration camps.

Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. The Norwegian Nobel Committee called him a
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