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Win-Win Ecology: How the Earth's Species Can Survive in the Midst of Human Enterprise
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Win-Win Ecology: How the Earth's Species Can Survive in the Midst of Human Enterprise

3.62 of 5 stars 3.62  ·  rating details  ·  26 ratings  ·  9 reviews
As humanity presses down inexorably on the natural world, people debate the extent to which we can save the Earth's millions of different species without sacrificing human economic welfare. But is this argument wise? Must the human and natural worlds be adversaries?
In this book, ecologist Michael Rosenzweig finds that ecological science actually rejects such polarization.
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Hardcover, 224 pages
Published April 24th 2003 by Oxford University Press, USA
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David Bates
So,on the topic of the general catastrophic extinction event the earth is currently undergoing, Michael Rosenzweig has some thoughts. Those thoughts vary in their quality.

When you get to the middle-back of this book, there are some great chapters on species diversity. Apparently creating conservation preserves really can't significantly put a firm backstop in extinction, because species diversity depends on movement of populations. A lot of the diversity in any given spot isn't created by popula
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Adam
Win-win Ecology is a sales pitch for Rosenzweig's pet Big Idea, “Reconciliation Ecology.” The problem is, I don't really feel like Rosenzweig ever even had the idea. The book reads like Rosenzweig was stuck in an airport with John Vandermeer and Ivette Perfecto and they gave him the layman's version of Nature's Matrix, he thought it was just so profound and stuff, and now he's telling his Aunt all about it. It is exaggeratedly folksy at times, and way, way oversells his assertion that reconcilia ...more
Jeneenw
Interesting take on how conservation must evolve to fit the changing world. Reserving land and ecosystems is not enough (will never be big enough...not enough left); restoring is crazy expensive and we won't ever be able to do it perfectly and it doesn't take into account change that would have happened; "reconciliation" is necessary. What I did like about the book: this concept fits into sustainable thinking & permaculture. What I did not like about the book: too much conceptualizing and to ...more
Chris
I am probably a bit critical of this book because we read it for a graduate seminar (and we tended to kinda tear it apart). Rosenzweig builds a convincing argument that the land we have set aside to preserve native species is simply not enough to prevent massive loss of diversity. Therefore, we need to structure our human-altered habitats to accommodate the survival and reproduction of other species (what he calls reconciliation ecology). Good idea, important idea, but overall the guidelines to ...more
Chris
I am probably a bit critical of this book because we read it for a graduate seminar (and we tended to kinda tear it apart). Rosenzweig builds a convincing argument that the land we have set aside to preserve native species is simply not enough to prevent massive loss of diversity. Therefore, we need to structure our human-altered habitats to accommodate the survival and reproduction of other species (what he calls reconciliation ecology). Good idea, important idea, but overall the guidelines to ...more
Libby
Maybe I shouldn't read ecology books for lay people, as I was really frustrated by the conversational, almost sing-song-y style of the author. I like the general ideas he has, but just found that he didn't really build on them enough, or think about how problems and solutions change with scale. Most of the good solutions he presents are unique and/or focused on single species.

He also injects God a lot into the discussion, which was unnecessary. I suppose maybe some people need that in order to
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Heidi
I actually read ALL of it. First assigned book in college that I did. I like how he still includes religion in it and how we are belived to be the dominant species but how that doesn't have to mean we destroy everything. It's the first book from my "Extinction, Evolution and Human Enterprise" class that I've agreed with almost whole-heartedly. Suprisingly, so did the rest of the class. I thought people would hate it since I actually agreed. We've got about 13 people that come to class (it's hono ...more
Kelly
I liked the approach and the examples that were used for diiferent components. The author stressed that these were examples of reconciliation ecology. I don't see the importance of placing the term there because I see them as examples of sustainable development. That said I thought he did a very good job of showing how people and nature can exist for the benefit of both, but also stressed the importance of traditional restoration and preservation.
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