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Privacy and Big Data
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Privacy and Big Data

3.44 of 5 stars 3.44  ·  rating details  ·  25 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Much of what constitutes Big Data is information about us. Through our online activities, we leave an easy-to-follow trail of digital footprints that reveal who we are, what we buy, where we go, and much more. This eye-opening book explores the raging privacy debate over the use of personal data, with one undeniable conclusion: once data's been collected, we have absolutel ...more
Paperback, 108 pages
Published September 29th 2011 by O'Reilly Media (first published September 16th 2011)
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Danial
This book acts a fantastic follow-up to this year's Privacy in the Age of Big Data . Where Payton's book focuses on the ground-up explanation of data collection methods, usage, and technologies, Privacy and Big Data focuses on the philosophies of privacy, privacy regulations, and the regulatory players on an international level. At about 100 pages, it's a quick read, isn't overloaded with jargon or overtly academic speak, and is an enjoyable read.
Sara M. Watson
This O’Reilly Media book provides a thorough and easy to understand overview of the forces at play in the ongoing privacy discussion. The authors do a decent job of outlining some of the fundamental differences in the US v. EU approach to privacy, but the overview tends to create a false dichotomy between these two regimes, giving little weight to the Asian or 3rd world regulation of privacy, or the implications of a lack thereof.

I particularly like how they handle the discussion of advertising
...more
Neil


Basically a generic overview of data in the web. Not useful for someone already in the field. May be good for someone new to security on the web.
Terry
Decent book. Too wordy. Discussion threads hard to follow. Rushed effort it seems at times.
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“It seems that we are back where we started. Historically, as small tribes of hunter and gatherers we had no concept of privacy. Then, as we became rooted in towns and villages, we continued to live primarily in the public square where everyone “knew our business.” With industrialization and the development of large dense urban areas, privacy was possible for the more privileged members of society and then, finally, for all of us. We have come full circle. Again, we live our lives in a public, although now digital, square where any person, company, or organization around the world can watch us, whether we want them to or not. There is more known about us than ever before. What does privacy mean in the world we now live in? This is not the first time (and certainly won’t be the last) that technology has leapfrogged ethics, bringing us to the age old
question of what we can do versus what we should do. The question we should all be asking ourselves, our communities, our societies, and our leaders is this: does privacy still matter in the digital age? Yes, privacy still matters in this age of big data and digital devices. But what it means, how we regulate and enforce it, what we are willing to give up for it, how much power we give our governments over it, remains to be seen. Like it or not, we live in interesting times.”
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