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Batman: La broma asesina
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Batman: La broma asesina (Batman)

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4.36 of 5 stars 4.36  ·  rating details  ·  76,480 ratings  ·  1,720 reviews
La broma asesina es una historia centrada en el Joker, la antítesis de Batman por definición, y en la relación que éste y Batman han llegado a desarrollar a lo largo de los años. El relato comienza cuando se fuga por enésima vez del manicomio de Arkham. A partir de ahí, asistiremos a dos historia paralelas. Por un lado, a modo de flashbacks, se nos muestra el "origen" del ...more
Paperback, Prestige, 52 pages
Published November 1988 by Editorial Zinco (DC Comics) (first published 1988)
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Roxas Wally 15 and up it had some those scary looks of Joker in the comic which is kinda creepy for a young child if you are planning to give it to one
Roxas Wally Red Hood isn't in this comic and yes if you wanna know how Joker changed,what he was and his personal life I would highly recommend it but it might be…moreRed Hood isn't in this comic and yes if you wanna know how Joker changed,what he was and his personal life I would highly recommend it but it might be different from a comic to another....(less)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Erin
Mar 15, 2008 Erin rated it 1 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Erin by: Zak
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Ronyell
5.5 stars!!!

OH…MY…GOD…

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I thought I knew everything there was to know about the Joker, one of Batman’s greatest foes. But after reading “Batman: The Killing Joke” and how the Joker was portrayed in this book, the Joker has officially become one of the most VILE, TWISTED, DARK and most DISTURBING villain I have ever come face to face with…AND I LOVED IT! Being brilliantly written by Alan Moore and being masterfully illustrated by Brian Bolland, “Batman: The Killing Joke” has remained to be one of
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Tosh
Through out my life I have been a borderline Joker obsessive. Even when I was a little tot I had a thing for the Joker. And what got me excited about the first Tim Burton 'Batman' was actually the Joker. No Joker, not so much into Batman.

So yes I do spend some time on YouTube locating images of the new 'Heath' Joker (which looks great) and it is really a great American invention. I think the image of the Joker will go on and on - maybe beyond Batman himself.

Nevertheless I was attracted to this
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Stephen
5.0 stars. With all due respect to the iconic Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller, this, in my opinion, is the BEST Batman graphic novel ever written. This was the best portrayal of the brutality of the Joker I have ever seen and also the best depiction of the complicated (and you could say twisted) relationship between Batman and the Joker. Truly an epic piece of fiction. Highest Possible Recommendation!!!
Chris
I wasn't going to do this one as an official entry - it's so quick to read that it feels like I'm padding the list. But the more I thought about it, the more I felt I wanted to talk about it, and so it goes on the List.

This was originally published twenty years ago, and is still one of the most popular and well-regarded Batman stories ever. Between them, Moore and Bolland - a master writer and a master artist - gave Batman and his prime antagonist new lives and new meaning.

It starts off in an un
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Brad
When I read this back in 1988, while everyone was still wetting themselves over Frank Miller's Dark Knight concept from 1986, I was wetting myself over Alan Moore's one-shot bit of Joker genius, Batman The Killing Joke.

I read it numerous times during the nineties, then put it away (my reading copy nestled next to my mint, Mylar-bagged, first edition) and kept hold of my memories.

For me Killing Joke was much more interesting than Dark Knight because Batman was interested in understanding his ene
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Patrick
Jul 24, 2008 Patrick rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who enjoyed 'The Dark Knight'
Although I'm still something of a neophyte when it comes to the world of Graphic novels, I can certainly see the appeal to people of all ages.

This is the second full length graphic novel I've read, both by Alan Moore (the other being his opus, 'The Watchmen'), and both have been excellent. Both seem to re-imagine the superhero world as one with real, flawed people trying to reconcile their humanity with their jobs as protectors of the public at-large.

'The Killing Joke' picks up with the known qu
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Dan Schwent
I'm probably risking a lynching from the fanboy mob but I liked this a whole lot more than the other well-regarded bat-book, The Dark Knight Returns. It nicely illustrates the Batman/Joker dynamic as well as highlights their similarities. Joker seemed like a psychopath rather than the buffoon he was normally portrayed as at the time. Shooting *spoiler* in the spine and taking pictures in order to try to break *spoiler*. Awesome. My favorite part was the Joker and Batman sharing a laugh while wai ...more
Brandon
I really didn't like Watchmen (which I think I may be in the minority on) and didn't see what all the hype surrounding Alan Moore was all about. But my God, this book was jaw-droppingly excellent.

To this day, I have never really experienced a Joker origin story (well, unless you count Tim Burton's 1989 Batman) so this was pretty much all new to me. The fact that Alan Moore hammers it home time and time again that Joker is the way he is because of one bad day is pretty chilling. It also coincides
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Lenette
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Michael Benavidez
it's hard to give this a proper review. for starters I thought it would be longer, but that's on me.
There are two stories unfolding. The origins of the Joker (which I thought killed a bit of the mystery until a certain point made it that there are several stories he uses) and his attempt to make Gordon insane.
It's very mature, which fits the Joker's unrestrained style, it's twisted and the dialogue is absolutely fantastic. There isn't much more for me to say without it becoming fluff and perha
...more
Ekairidium
Alan Moore’s blissfully insane The Killing Joke was Tim Burton’s inspiration for his Joker in his Batman movies. It was said that he insisted to adapt the Joker’s origin story from this comic book and upon reading TKJ myself, I understood perfectly why. This only has 46 pages but those pages are filled with gore and twisted imagery that will fuel your nightmares.

This was incredibly piercing to digest for me; I'm not one to shy away from whatever depravity is depicted in books but this one was u
...more
Sam Quixote
Batman goes to Arkham Asylum on a fool's errand - to try and talk sense to the Clown Prince of Crime, the Joker. But Joker's not there! He's escaped and plans on destroying the Gordon family. Will the Dark Knight save them? Or will Joker have the last laugh...

First off, this is an acknowledged classic and I utterly loved it when I read it several years ago. Re-reading it now, I can say this book most definitely holds up, this is a classic Batman book for a reason. What I forgot was how slim a bo
...more
Rob
Story
I vaguely knew the details of Oracle's origins but had never realized this was the book where it began. I only recently heard the title in a clip of the panel at NYCC this year introducing Troy Baker as the Joker a few weeks back.

Unfortunately the book didn't really live up to the performance Mr. Baker gave for me. Overall the story just didn't do much for me, and the ending just felt abrupt and bizarre. To me more seems to come from the aftermath of the events in this book, than the book
...more
Stella  ☢FAYZ☢ Chen
Boy oh boy. Had the library been one week late on delivering my hold request of this book, I think I would have gone mad.

Last weekend, I kind of had an emotional breakdown. The levee holding back grade 12 stresses finally broke. BUT, have not fear, Mr. Alan Moore was here to save me. I hid in my room and read The Killing Joke, over and over again. I lost count after the 3rd hour I spent in my room. The story was so moving and the Joker, at the moment of reading it, seemed like a man telling my s
...more
Algernon
I've been neglecting my comic book shelves, so I decided to get back in the game with something special, and Alan Moore delivered the goods, as usual. I only wish the story arc was longer: I really got into the groove, and then it was over. Great artwork, I read the revised edition coloured by Brian Bolland, and a mature script that is bound to heal me of my preconceptions about superheroes in tights and flowing capes. Favorite scene : the roller coastr ride of Commissioner Gordon and the Joker ...more
Veljko Vukojičić
The Killing Joke.

Given that the majority of fans consider this to be one of the best(if not the best) Batman stories ever written.. And given that this is Moore's most famous Batman story...

I must say I am disappointed.


Talking about Moore, I have only words of praise about that man. The real master of words, and by far the best comic writer ever. Period. No arguing.

Despite that, after reading "The Killing Joke", I felt totally indifferent. Moreover disgruntled.
Considering that this comic tells a
...more
Kemper
One of the greatest and most brutal Joker stories ever told. Moore at his best.
Anthony
So, chances are, you've heard of this book. Like Watchmen, it's a graphic novel that's popular amongst people who don't read comics on a regular, month to month, basis (I think society calls them 'normal', but I digress).

Having just re-read it for the third, possibly fourth time, I think it lives up to the hype it's surrounded by. Now, I'm not big on the idea of giving the Joker a detailed back story. I think he works better when there's ambiguity to his origin, which is one of the things I love
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Helen
"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and
strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown."

-Howard Phillips Lovecraft, Supernatural Horror In Literature


Yes, yes, I know. Technically, Joker's origin presented here is supposed to be "multiple choice". That argument would have much more weight if we were presented by some more choices.

Why not have Joker try to drive Gordon crazy by making him filter through truth and lies while attempting to figure which story is true
...more
Brigham
I wasn't going to review this one because it's quite short, but as soon as I finished it I went back and read it again in the most natural of movements. The second time around I saw more layers unfolding through the stark colors, the subtle dialogue and the joke on the final page.

I have to say though the most lingering moment came in an epilogue that I'm not sure was in the original comic. (I have a hardback release that just came out) A man records himself talking about a crime he's involved i
...more
Federiken Masters
Mar 03, 2010 Federiken Masters rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Todo el mundo.
Recommended to Federiken by: Lucho Escorpicón.
De chico la leí y mucho no entendí, pero me deslumbró el dibujo y la narrativa. De grande lo releí y me gustó tanto como antes, con el añadido de que entendí toda la historia y los guiños del autor (al menos eso creo). Cuando lo relea seguro me explaye y le escriba una reseña como la gente.

Leído y poseído de la edición de Perfil publicado en Argentina a principios de los 90s. Esa edición estaba bastante bien pero padecía de los errores típicos de aquella editorial, como el "castellano neutro" ll
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Jackie "the Librarian"
I haven't read any of the Batman comics, and I read this because I had heard Heath Ledger used it to inspire his take on The Joker. I loved the dark artwork, the color palate, everything about the LOOK of the story. The artistry is outstanding.
But the story falls short. It assumes too much knowledge on the part of the reader, knowledge I don't have. So, I don't get it. The punch, the power, it's not here.
I think the author assumes you have the backstory necessary to provide that power. And I th
...more
Joanna
This is sadly overrated. I've liked Alan Moore's other work, and expected to like this one, too; it's often listed as one of the best Batman tales ever (one otherwise spot-on ranking from IGN puts it at #3). But it was one of the most disappointing of the ones I've read thus far. I'm a bigger fan of the more realistic approaches that Loeb and Miller employ. Moore is normally big on realism in his comics, but he misses the mark here somehow. His version of the Joker makes only a little bit of sen ...more
Robert
This is certainly a good graphic novel, but I found the writing disappointing, especially coming from Alan Moore. He plays his usual games with self-reference and clever placement of words and images, but I found the Joker's plot to be surprisingly shallow and uninspired. The light touch at the end between him and Batman was also jarring. But I don't want to trash this work. It is very good, just unequal to the hype. In any case it contributed to the Batman canon (because of what happens to Barb ...more
Ruel
I've read this graphic novel numerous times and it never fails to impress me. I breezed through it again tonight and what stood out this time was how much Alan Moore packed into this story. I always think it's longer than it is, but it's a short story that goes beyond the Joker's origin and delves into his complicated relationship with Batman. Fans of the movie The Dark Knight will enjoy The Killing Joke; this, along with Frank Miller's Batman: Year One, was the source material for Christopher N ...more
Satinder
I have heard so much about this book, it was almost inevitable that i read it. It is featured on every list of "Great Graphic Novels"; best "Batman Stories". And am i glad i did. Batman is a superhero who has had the fortune of being written by some of the best artists of the medium, he also has some of the best stories. But The Killing Joke is not only one of the best but also one of the scariest. Alan Moore focused on madness rather than any one character, making us question ourselves, our del ...more
Amanda
The third in my series of Batman stories is “The Killing Joke.” This is a Batman verses Joker story. As I mentioned in my last review, the joker is unoriginally my favorite Batman villian. I think he is everyone’s favorite, and for a reason. He is mad, pure and simple. The acts he commits are not carried out to gain something, like wealth or revenge. He is chaos at his core. That makes him completely unpredictable and fun to read.

In the story he aims to spotlight the differences he sees in himse
...more
Anthony
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
jerica
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
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  • Batman, Vol. 2: The City of Owls
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name.

Alan Moore is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. He has also written a novel, Voice of the Fire, and performs "workings" (one-off performance art/spoken word pieces) with The Moon and Serpent Grand Egypt
...more
More about Alan Moore...
Watchmen V for Vendetta The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1 From Hell The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 2

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“MEMORY'S SO TREACHEROUS. ONE MOMENT YOU'RE LOST IN A CARNIVAL OF DELIGHTS, WITH POIGNANT CHILDHOOD AROMAS , THE FLASHING NEON OF PUBERTY, ALL THAT SENTIMENTAL CANDY-FLOSS ...

THE NEXT , IT LEADS YOU SOMEWHERE YOU DON'T WANT TO GO...

...SOMEWHERE DARK AND COLD, FILLED WITH THE DAMP, AMBIGUOUS SHAPES OF THINKS YOU'D HOPED WERE FORGOTTEN.

MEMORIES CAN BE VILE, REPULSIVE LITTLE BRUTES. LIKE CHILDREN, I SUPPOSE. HAHA.

BUT CAN WE LIVE WITHOUT THEM? MEMORIES ARE WHAT OUR REASON IS BASED UPON. IF WE CAN'T FACE THEM, WE DENY REASON ITSELF!

ALGHOUGH, WHY NOT? WE AREN'T CONTRACTUALLY TIED DOWN TO RATIONALITY!

THERE IS NO SANITY CLAUSE!

SO WHEN YOU FIND YOURSELF LOCKED ONTO AN UNPLEASANT TRAIN OF THOUGHT, HEADING FOR THE PLACES IN YOUR PAST WHERE THE SCREAMING IS UNBEARABLE, REMEMBER THERE'S ALWAYS MADNESS.

MADNESS IS THE EMERGENCY EXIT...

YOU CAN JUST STEP OUTSIDE, AND CLOSE THE DOOR ON ALL THOSE DREADFUL THINGS THAT HAPPENED. YOU CAN LOCK THEM AWAY...

FOREVER.”
185 likes
“So when you find yourself locked onto an unpleasant train of thought, heading for the places in your past where the screaming is unbearable, remember there's always madness. Madness is the emergency exit.” 149 likes
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