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St. Ives: Being The Adventures of a French Prisoner in England

3.58  ·  Rating Details  ·  83 Ratings  ·  16 Reviews
From the creator of Treasure Island and Kidnapped, and written while he lived in Samoa, this was the author's last title. Stevenson had written all but the very conclusion of this work at the time of his death. His stepdaughter had been serving as his secretary and was in possession of an outline for the ending. In order to conclude the story the publisher enlisted the tal ...more
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Published October 11th 2007 by BiblioLife (first published 1897)
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Jim
Mar 02, 2014 Jim rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
About the Author

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh, the son of an engineer. He briefly studied engineering, then law, and contributed to university magazines while a student. Despite life-long poor health, he was an enthusiastic traveller, writing about European travels in the late 1870s and marrying in America in 1879. He contributed to various periodicals, writing first essays and later fiction. His first novel was Treasure Island in 1883, intended for his stepson, who coll

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Sam
This is another of Stevenson's epic adventure stories that follows a French soldier as he is taken capture after enrolling in Napoleon's army under a pseudonym. The story follows his adventures with the army, his time as a prisoner and his travels around Britain following his release. It is written with Stevenson's typical skill at story telling and his sense of adventure. A fabulously traditional adventure story.
Carli
Sep 10, 2012 Carli rated it it was amazing
My mom gave me this book for Christmas, and it sat on my shelf for six months because it didn't look interesting. Finally forced myself to pick it up....and it's beautiful. Not one of his deepest stories perhaps, but very sweet and touching. I loved it.
Kit Dunsmore
I read a Kindle edition I got from Project Gutenberg and do not know if this is the same editiong. Mine did not include the extra chapters written by Quiller-Couch, so the story ended abruptly.

Having just seen the movie St. Ives, I was surprised by how much and how quickly the book proved to be different from the film. The movie was fun -- a light-hearted Napoleonic romance -- and some of that is in Stevenson's unfinished novel. But I confess I do not know where he thought he was going with his
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K.
Apr 26, 2016 K. rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: lovers of hokey old romantical adventures
Re-read. (I know I read this at least once before, as I read my whole gorgeous set of RLS books that were once owned by my maternal grandfather).

Despite that, didn't have much memory of this book at all. It is ADORABLE! Such a fun sense of humor.

In my aforementioned gorgeous set (dated 1897, Charles Scribner's Sons) there is the following editorial note:

"The following tale was taken down from Mr. Stevenson's dictation by his step-daughter and amanuensis, Mrs. Strong, at intervals between Janu
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Andrew Ives
May 13, 2012 Andrew Ives rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Aaaaagh! The ending was missing! The story, though rather linear, was entertaining and written with RLS' usual style and wit. Set in the early 1800s, the story is told from a first person perspective, following St Yves the French prisoner's journey up and down the length of England. Compared to Treasure Island, St Ives is a little pedestrian and hardly jam-packed with derring-do, but I liked it better for that.

[I have since read the ending by Arthur Quiller-Couch, who does a quite marvellous jo
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Mirah W
Jul 28, 2011 Mirah W rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I read a digital version of this novel. Imagine my joy when I got to the end and read "At this point the Author's manuscript breaks off." The end. I guess I should have done more research before reading this. Apparently it was completed by someone else after Stevenson's death...if I had known this I would have read the completed version. So, I'll review what was written by Stevenson. I rate the novel as three stars....I felt there was a lot missing and too much dedicated to the travels between p ...more
Victoria Jackson
Name of Viscomte de St Yves, French Napoleonic prisoner of war escapes from Edinburgh Castle - down the rock face to claim his inheritance. Adventure and humour. Excellent
Victoria Jackson
French Nopoleonic Prisoner of War escapes from Edinburgh Castle, down the rock face to claim his inheritance
Christopher Newton
I would call it a 19th century bathtub book (def: book suitable for reading in the bathtub). Writing is lovely, characterizations are disarming, storyline is farfetched. Its near-fatal drawback: RLS died before finishing it and the publisher gave it to Mr. Quiller-Couch to wrap up based on Stevenson's notes. Unfortunately, he turned a charming treat into a boring slog.
David Ambrose
Sep 09, 2014 David Ambrose rated it liked it
Shelves: literature
It's been a while since I have read a Robert Louis Stevenson book, but I think this was below average for him. The plot is, of course, some adventurous romp, in which the hero is always in danger. Several of the hero's escapes are just nonsense, though, as are some of the situations that he needs to escape. I found reading this tedious after a while.
Wendy
Aug 11, 2014 Wendy rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Too much love, not enough adventure makes this less believable and less fun than most Stevenson novels. The abrupt ending is also a bummer.
Ed Patterson
This was so much fun to read. And, it was RLS's last book! It even has a hot air balloon scene.
Gem
Feb 09, 2011 Gem is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
The copy I own is a battered second-hand hardback pocket book published in 1905.
William
Jan 05, 2011 William rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Good read, great slice of life in prison and warfare in a more civil time
Robyn
Sep 30, 2011 Robyn rated it really liked it
Really enjoyed it, lots of passages reminded me of Kidnapped.
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Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of English literature. He was greatly admired by many authors, including Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Hemingway, Rudyard Kipling and Vladimir Nabokov.

Most modernist writers dismissed him, however, because he was popular and did not write within their narrow definition of literature. It is o
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“His interest never flagged.  He would hear the same word twenty times with profound refreshment, mispronounce it in several different ways, and forget it again with magical celerity. ” 0 likes
“It is always a bad sign when the lower classes laugh: their taste in humour is both poor and sinister;” 0 likes
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