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Tolstoy: The Death of Ivan Ilyich & Master and Man
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Tolstoy: The Death of Ivan Ilyich & Master and Man

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3.97 of 5 stars 3.97  ·  rating details  ·  496 ratings  ·  30 reviews
In these two famous short novels, Leo Tolstoy takes readers to the brink of despair. At the end of life worldly ambition offers no consolation for the spiritually empty soul. But Tolstoy is the master of themes of redemption. He turns his morbid topic into hope, leading toward spiritual awakening. Tolstoy offers his readers a lifetime of perspective on a most human subject
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Published September 1st 2005 by Hovel Audio (first published 1866)
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Christine
In general, I don't care for Depressing, Fatalistic Russian Literature, but this I liked. The story begins with the news of Ivan Ilyich's death and then it goes back in time telling about his life and his slow torturous death. I explores how we live to expectations of society only to realize we haven't lived well. It's a story very well told. I am not sure how well it would play for the middle school set, but it is a great introduction to Depressing, Fatalistic Russian Literature without having ...more
Padma

The Death of Ivan Ilyich.

Shocking and disturbingly startling!! That’s what I felt about this book. How can “the process of death” be made so gripping? Leo Tolstoy, a master with words, did it. The subject may be dry, the story may be slow once in a while, but we will excuse everything. We will move along with the terrifying and the gripping emotions, questions and answers that Ivan Ilyich finds along the way.

An entire life, supposedly lived well according to Ilyich, came crumbling down like a p
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Shawn
I'll be reading this book as part of Leland Ryken's "Commending the Classics" series on The Gospel Coalition's website (first installment found here: http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/t...).
James
Reading the tale, Master and Man, seems appropriate in the midst of winter. Tolstoy wrote this tale about a decade after The Death of Ivan Ilych and Winter cold is so important in the story that it becomes yet another character by the end of this sophisticated parable. Snow and biting winds gust from its pages. Its climactic event, the transferal of heat from one body to another, has a resonance that cannot be denied, but my question would be: can it be believed?

The story begins just following t
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David
"There is a Easter fable, told a long time ago, about a traveler caught in open country by a wild beast. To escape from the beast the traveler jumps into a dry well, but at the bottom of the well he sees a dragon with its jaws open to devour him. And the unfortunate man, not daring to climb out lest he be destroyed by the wild beast, and not daring to jump to the bottom of the well lest he be devoured by the dragon, seizes hold of a branch of a wild bush growing in a crack in the well and clings ...more
Anshul Gaurav
What if one fine day you wake up and realise you are dying? This happens to you, a high flyer, well settled , of a respectable background, a normal worldly careerist who had never given the inevitability of his death so much so as a passing thought.

'The Death of Ivan Ilyich' is a portrait of a man miserable on realization that in he would be no more than a hung portrait in the hall, a name on the gravestone, or a passing thought in his kin's mind. 'What if', he recounts, 'my entire life, my enti
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Elle
Review from June 2010:

[Yay! Er...not sure if I should say Yay to a story about death.I'd never read Tolstoy before, so I thought I'd give him a try. My intended minor (whenever I get to transfer...) is Russian & Slavic Culture, so I might as well start now. I chose these two stories because one appears on the 1001 list, and it jumped out at me at the library!I'm not sure if all Russian literature is like this, but these two short stories wereheavy. Full of weight (thanks for this mode of th
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Ellyn Lem
A sign of a good book is one that can be read over and over without it losing its power. This is one of those books. . . no wonder some medical schools have their residents read the novella to understand the various emotions people go through when they are dying. Tolstoy wrote a masterful work filled with insights not only from the perspective of the person coming to the end of life but how others react to him. It remains powerful.
Lakshmi Narasimhan
for those who are going to die, for those who are dying and for those who are there in their mother's womb, you death is a already fixed, one who is getting old, from busy job during mid life to a hollow,directionless,failing body in the old age. apart from death the waiting kills so much, tolstoy has captured the intricacies of old age, i remember my grandfather who suffered 3 months at a stretch to leave his body, and to my other grand father who is presently in his last stage of life struggli ...more
Emmett
Loved both stories, especially how the first dealt with the notion of how realising one's own death makes us reflect on a life well lived, or realise with horror one that is not. This translation seems more...modern than some I've read - maybe in the use of words or style. Overall a succinct introduction to Tolstoy (since I'm deciding whether it would be a suitable read for a thirteen year old acquaintance); the length, speed and flow are perfect. The footnotes would be much better were they pri ...more
Sarah Knox
It is difficult to rate this story. Tolstoy is masterful and devastating and as a reader you can feel the absolute anguish of Ivan Ilyich's death. All these things considered, this story is still approximately one-hundred pages of a man dying while his family sits idly by, basically hoping for the process to come to a conclusion. It is sad, it is terrifying and it really slaps you in the face with the reality of death, but it is also powerful and uplifting in its own dark way.
Michael
Douglas Adams wrote in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe of a torture device that would confront a person viewing it with "just one momentary glimpse of the entire unimaginable infinity of creation." The vortex, in showing the viewer just how temporary he is an eternal universe, is traumatic enough to drive the viewer permanently mad.

Tolstoy's writing has, more or less, this same effect.
Alesh Houdek
Two little novellas. A nice introduction, though I always worry about whether the translation I'm reading is as good as it could be. There are footnotes, too, though I'm not sure why they think skipping to the back of the book all the time is fun. Why not put them at the bottom of the page?

Anyway, I wanted an intro to Tolstoy and this was perfect: somber, heavy, and rich.
Joe
"It could only be explained if one could say I hadn't lived as I should. But that is quite inadmissable.", he said to himself, remembering his law-abiding, correct, and proper life. "To accept that would be quite impossible," he said to himself... "There is no explanation!"
Denise
Good introduction to Leo Tolstoy. Felt almost like a prequel to "Anna Karenina" at times, but that is due to the time period, class and location of the novel. Another good book to get you thinking about how you want to live -- maybe before you are on your deathbed.
Valerie
the process of letting go is harder for some. death is a solo activity. you can't take it with you. no rest for the weary.
and this edition has a great cover.

this was my second reading.
Laura
I read the story of "Master and Man" within this compilation. It was a powerful and moving story of man's assumptions about power and what really matters in life.
SW
Just read Master and Man. Didn't care much for this particular translation.

For the most part the story is great, but I still have mixed feelings about the ending.
Jonathan
A perfect story. I picture Jonathan Franzen reading this once every year, then draining a tall glass of tequila and crying himself to sleep.
Joe
i know he is a titan, but not a huge fan. he is far more depressing that dostoevsky. and his theology is whacked
Angie
I'm pretty ambivalent about this one. It's short and easy to read but I didn't really connect in any significant way.
Shauna
Book club selection that I really didn't like. We only read Ivan Ilyich but the depression was overwhelming as I read.
Chris
damn. tolstoy is timeless: he can speak to any audience across time and space. these two stories are so impressive.
T Sager
Tolstoy lays out our lives. Reading this book made me not want to waste any moment of the rest of my life.
A.S. Peterson
Great short story. Amazing how something written over 100 years ago can be so completely contemporary.
MountainPoet
Master and Man is by far my favorite Tolstoy short story. Death of Ivan Ilyich is right up there as well.
Timm DiStefano
Might have fit me more in high school but is too dark for me right now.
Amy
Only read Death of Ivan Ilyich
Daniel
A story of the ultimate sacrifice.
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Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: Лев Николаевич Толстой; commonly Leo Tolstoy in Anglophone countries) was a Russian writer who primarily wrote novels and short stories. Later in life, he also wrote plays and essays. His two most famous works, the novels War and Peace and Anna Karenina, are acknowledged as two of the greatest novels of all time and a pinnacle of realist fiction. Many consider To ...more
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