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The Enigma of the Aerofoil: Rival Theories in Aerodynamics, 1909-1930
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The Enigma of the Aerofoil: Rival Theories in Aerodynamics, 1909-1930

3.86  ·  Rating Details ·  7 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
Why do aircraft fly? How do their wings support them? In the early years of aviation, there was an intense dispute between British and German experts over the question of why and how an aircraft wing provides lift. The British, under the leadership of the great Cambridge mathematical physicist Lord Rayleigh, produced highly elaborate investigations of the nature of ...more
Hardcover, 608 pages
Published November 15th 2011 by University Of Chicago Press (first published October 3rd 2011)
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Mark
May 05, 2016 Mark rated it it was ok
Shelves: unfinished, science
Let me start you off wit a good one:
"diese Absonderung der technischen Mechanik als eines... oh wait, you prolly want the english version:
"...practitoners must have the freedom to develop concept of their own, and these might be distinct from those acceptable in the more reflective and leisurely branches of knowledge." (!!!)
Now THAT, in case you missed it, was a roll-on-the-floor lauging zinger where August Foppl puts some stuffed shirt British mathemascientists in their place, bay-bee! So to al
...more
William Hearst
Sep 04, 2016 William Hearst rated it really liked it
I can't stand easily next to a ledge, or even a clear glass window, without some vertigo. But I can bank in an airplane nearly 60 degrees without any sensation of fear. I think the reason is an airplane is meant to fly. That is what it does. Whereas humans are meant to fall. The reason wings work has been a subject of observation, speculation, and reasoned analysis. We can compute how much lift an airfoil will generate, at various speeds, and angles of attack. But there was, and still is, some ...more
Erik
Aug 21, 2013 Erik rated it really liked it
A tough read, but Bloor's defense of the Strong Program in the sociology of scientific knowledge is powerful and compelling.
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