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The World Slaveholders Made: Two Essays in Interpretation
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The World Slaveholders Made: Two Essays in Interpretation

really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating Details  ·  31 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
A seminal and original work that delves deeply into what slaveholders thought.
Paperback, 304 pages
Published March 1st 1988 by Wesleyan (first published March 1st 1971)
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JS Found
Mar 05, 2013 JS Found rated it really liked it
Genovese was a Marxist historian who explored slavery from the point o view of the slaveholders. And the African-American slaves. He sought to take the slavers claims seriously and to try to understand them, without labeling them as the ahistorical "evil." What I mean is that they were more complicated than that and to dismiss their ideology is to ignore the real exigencies and justifications of why slavery existed in favor of sweeping that period and those people as anomalies. To truly prevent ...more
Fred R
Apr 16, 2011 Fred R rated it liked it
The first essay, although often interrupted by bursts of Marxist jargon as if from a garbled transmission, is a reasonable summary of slavery in the new world. His discussion of the difference between absentee and paternalist slaveholding is well taken.

The second essay is where the real meat is. Eugene Genovese, himself an idiosyncratic thinker, undertakes to summarize and analyze the work of George Fitzhugh, as fullest expression of the ideological development of slavery in the new world. Not o
...more
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Eugene Dominic Genovese was an American historian of the American South and American slavery. He has been noted for bringing a Marxist perspective to the study of power, class and relations between planters and slaves in the South. His work Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made won the Bancroft Prize. He later abandoned the Left and Marxism, and embraced traditionalist conservatism.
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