Sue Barton, Student Nurse (Sue Barton, #1)
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Sue Barton, Student Nurse (Sue Barton #1)

4.04 of 5 stars 4.04  ·  rating details  ·  419 ratings  ·  40 reviews
This is the story of Sue Barton's first year of training as a probationer and then as a student nurse. Sue, with her red hair and eager spirit, is a very likable person - direct, outspoken, capable of mistakes, capable also of warm attachments and a courageous devotion to the service which she soon loves. With her pals, Kit and Connie, she submits to the discipline and rig...more
Hardcover, 192 pages
Published 1955 by Random House (first published 1936)
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Nate D
Apr 06, 2013 Nate D marked it as read-in-2013  ·  review of another edition
So I've been threatening to read an actual nurse novel ever since Francis Johnson and today the actually totally amazing selection of dollar books outside of Book Thug Nation has allowed me to do so. This is apparently a classic of the genre from the 30s, here reissued by Teen Age Book Club in the 50s. Following the fairly mundane adventures of our plucky heroine as she makes it through the roughly first year of her nursing education at a big city hospital. With its general school-friend sense o...more
Ginny Messina
I don't know how I missed the Sue Barton books when I was growing up; my library must not have had them. But I'm happy to have the chance to read them now—-although I had to go all the way to Australia (via the internet) to find affordable copies of the first two.

First published in 1936, this is a fascinating portrayal of nursing in the 1930s. (Boylston herself graduated from nursing school in 1915, and the book is about her own experiences as a nursing student. But a conversation with a soldie...more
Trine
This book still holds its charms even though I must have read it a billion times and it is close to 70 years old. It manages masterly to combine a progressing story with the description of nursing training and presenting interesting characters both among staff and patients. The author imparts on the reader her own love for the hospital, its people and the job. No wonder I for years wanted to become a nurse after reading these books.
CLM
1) I always wish her rich friend had gone by Constance instead of Connie
2) There was a Sue Barton in my freshman dorm at college. She just looked at me blankly when I asked if she had considered nursing school instead! Maybe the Lexington, MA library didn't carry these books?
3) It is a pity that nurses these days don't wear caps but I guess the men wouldn't like it.*
4) Not to risk starting a war with that Eleanor woman but Sue was definitely better than Cherry!
5) Overall, I love this series; esp...more
Audrey
This is a charming book, with a refreshingly human heroine who is also very dedicated to her profession. The storyline is quite simple, but it is delightfully written and a lot of fun. I love the dialogue between Sue and her friends, Kit and Connie, and some of the crazy escapades they get into. (view spoiler) There are also some parts that I found to be quite funny.

I love the hospital culture that books like t...more
Donna
I got a copy of this at a library book sale that prices by the bag, so some books that I may not have ordinarily picked up found their way into my to-read pile.

Sue Barton, Student Nurse has a breezy, episodic feel, and I liked the old-fashioned style. The characters are pretty transparent and stereotypical, but I still enjoyed them. The most interesting parts were the details about both the day-to-day lives of the nurses and the vintage medical practices of the hospital.

I'd read more of these i...more
Margaret
I don't know many people outside of my family who read these, but they've been comfort reads for me for a long time. Boylston started writing them in the 1930s and continued into the 1950s, telling the story of a young woman who becomes a nurse, from nursing school through settlement work in New York City to marriage and nursing in a rural New Hampshire community. The gender roles are fairly dated (especially in the third book, which deals with Sue's dilemma between her nursing career and her do...more
Dani
The title chareacter Sue Barton is the daughter of a doctor who decides that she wants to go to nursing school. This book, the first of a series, is an account of her probationary period. It is a classic college story.

The dialogue in this book was a pleasant surprise. Although the passages concerning how Sue felt about the hospital bordered on sappy, the dialogue between Sue and her friends reminded of witty 1930s comedies. These snappy exchanges kept the book from reading as too goody-goody.

Som...more
Susann
Had a 24-hour bug this week and Sue was a great comfort.

6-29-2012:
I would have started reading even sooner, had I known that on her first day on the ward, Sue (view spoiler)!

Melody
Sue Barton, Student Nurse was written in 1936 by Helen Dore Boyleston and it ignited a desire in me to become a nurse that didn’t die for the next ten years. I was absolutely captivated by all of the books in this series and it inspired me to volunteer as a Candy Striper at the local hospital.

The first in the series, this book is about Sue Barton and her first year as a probationer and then as a student nurse. She attends nursing school far away from her home town, meets new friends, catches the...more
Rebecca
These are books my mom read when she was growing up, and then gave to me. We actually still have the 1964 paperback editions, which means that they're literally falling (or have already fallen) apart in my hands. They're set in the 1930's, so that makes part of the medical descriptions a little laughable--like learning how to use drops of chloroform in a paper funnel to keep a patient sedated for surgery. Also, nurses do not so much wear the white uniforms with the aprons and caps anymore. So th...more
Cera
There was a lot that I liked about this novel, but I really could have done without the farce aspects, which is why it only gets three stars. It seems to be drawing on some of the same tropes as girls boarding school books.

I did very much like that Sue is serious about her career, and the author actually shows Sue arguing against some of the sexism she encounters, which was a pleasant surprise.
Maria M. Elmvang
As the first book in the series, Sue Barton, Student Nurse is a quick read (took me no more than an hour or two), but a good one. It's a wonder I've never wanted to be a nurse or a doctor, as much as I love reading about their work. It's a feel-good book of the old-fashioned style and I greatly enjoyed it. I'll be looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
Maria
My mother loved these books when she was a girl and read them often. They're out of print now and hard to get ahold of, but if you can find them it would be worth your effort. Let it be said that they are obviously books from a different time and era, and because of that they are totally priceless. I loved them for their 1920's insight into woman's experience.
Barbara
OK, I read all the Sue Barton books, probably 50plus years ago. I loved each and every one!!! I loved Sue and I loved her boyfriend and you know what? I became a nurse!!!! Don't know whether I read them because at the time I wanted to be a nurse or did they affect me to become a nurse!
But how come her back never hurt like mine did!!!! after a day at work!
Pat
I've been trying to remember the name of this series of books ever since I joined Goodreads. I finally managed it today. Iread all of them when I was in junior school and really loved them. The books made me think of nursing as a career, but in the end I chose Ragiography instead.
Toni
I am amazed that the Sue Barton books are still in existence! I read (I think) the whole series when I was in fifth grade (many years ago) and I LOVED them at the time. I've no idea how they would read for today's readers, but am pleasantly surprised by the favorable reviews.
Shelley
I love love love this look at nursing in the 1930s. Sue and her friends seem so real and the details are captivating. I have the next few on request and can't wait to get through the whole series.
Daisy C
My favorite series of all time!! Sue Barton is always getting into funny situations and I laughed out loud a lot while reading this book. Too bad it's so hard to get now! :-(
Carol
I loved these books when I was young. I remember walking to the library in the summer to check them out.
Dee-Ann
read these when young, which inspired me to take up nursing. I think this was my gavourtie of the series.
Ellen B.
I loved this book when I was young. It was the beginning of my love of reading!
Mom
When I fell in love with Nursing and knew this would be my profession.
Cyd
read and cherished as a young adult
Fluffychick
I'd forgotten how much I'd adored this series as a child.
Maggie
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Astrid Johanne
Piger i Blåt er fantastik. Jeg har læst den et utal af gange siden jeg var teenager, og jeg bliver lige fordybet hvergang i hverdagen på et hospital i 50'erne. Det er ikke sidste gang at jeg har læst denne bog og dens efterfølgere.
Lizz
Love it! It gets better as the book goes on. I want to rate it a 3.75 star. I feel like I know Wendy Burton so much better from having read this book. Already putting in for the other books in the series.
Hazel
I recall telling my mother about this series. In particular, I'd noted the author's apparent ambivalence toward women doctors. I don't think I realised it had been written in the 30s. plus ca change...
Catherine
Feb 22, 2013 Catherine marked it as to-read
Just started to read it. Shame it's not on kindle. Bought it heap on amazon. Read it when I was a teenager and loved it. Hope I enjoy it second time around
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An only child, Helen Dore Boylston attended Portsmouth public schools and trained as a nurse at Massachusetts General Hospital. Two days after graduating, she joined the Harvard medical unit that had been formed to serve with the British Army. After the war, she missed the comradeship, intense effort, and mutual dependence of people upon one another when under pressure, and joined the Red Cross to...more
More about Helen Dore Boylston...
Sue Barton, Senior Nurse (Sue Barton, #2) Sue Barton, Visiting Nurse (Sue Barton, #3) Sue Barton, Rural Nurse (Sue Barton, #4) Sue Barton, Staff Nurse (Sue Barton #7) Sue Barton, Neighborhood Nurse (Sue Barton, #6)

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