Fragile Beginnings: Discoveries And Triumphs In The Newborn ICU
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Fragile Beginnings: Discoveries And Triumphs In The Newborn ICU

3.63 of 5 stars 3.63  ·  rating details  ·  110 ratings  ·  22 reviews
Half a million babies are born prematurely in the United States every year. In this gripping medical narrative, Dr. Adam Wolfberg brings readers into the complex world of newborn intensive care, where brilliant but imperfect doctors do all they can to coax life into their tiny, injured patients. As a specialist in high-risk obstetrics and the father of a child born prematu...more
Hardcover, 176 pages
Published February 7th 2012 by Beacon Press (first published January 1st 2012)
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Ciara
adam wolfberg was an OB resident when his wife went into premature labor & gave birth to their third daughter at only 26 weeks gestation. so he occupied the confusing space of being the devastated father of a micro-preemie facing any number of health complications (including a stage four brain bleed, which usually leads to catastrophic brain damage), & a doctor who had some idea what he was actually looking at. you'd think this would make for a uniquely compelling story, but unfortunatel...more
Darryl
Adam Wolfberg was an OB-GYN intern at Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital when his wife, Kelly, was pregnant with their third child, a girl who would be named Larissa. Her previous two pregnancies were uneventful, and all indicators pointed to another straightforward one. However, Kelly suddenly developed contractions when Larissa reached 26 weeks of gestation, 14 weeks before her due date. Despite the Wolfbergs' proximity to one of the leading obstetric and neonatal centers in the world, Kel...more
Jonna
The writing is a bit clunky, for all that the author was a journalist before he went to med school, and the personal aspect of his story is slightly incoherent in places. I’m not sure whether that’s the result of inadequate emotional processing or inadequate editing. On the other hand, he gives a nice history of neonatology – (so young! I didn’t realize the first surfactants weren’t approved for use until 1991. 1991!). Because his daughter (she was a 26-weeker) had a grade 4 IVH, he does a fair...more
Cindy
I'm loving this. A really good medical story is just about my favorite thing in the whole world. I temporarily set aside Catching Fire (Hunger Games #2) because I could not wait to read this. Medicine trumps fantasy! Truth is stranger than fiction - that's my motto.

The author is a doctor whose own daughter was born at 26 weeks. This fascinating story covers the physical, intellectual and emotional issues that surround the treatment and care of such extremely premature babies. I learned so much f...more
Carl R.
The story of Dr. and Mrs. Wolfberg's harrowing experience with the birth of their premature daughter is one that will tug at anyone's heartstrings, parent or not. The difficulty of the situation must have been nearly overwhelming at times yet Dr. Wolfberg has turned that experience into the opportunity to furnish us with not only his personal story but a well-researched examination into the state of NICU care today and its future going forward.

What struck me most about this book was the situatio...more
Cindy Dyson Eitelman
When I started this book I was fascinated to the extreme. The treatment of premie babies, the challenges and decisions and precision of needle-sharp skills required to keep them alive and growing outside the safe womb--it was impossible to put down. The historical passages were illuminating; the descriptions of the medical procedures fascinating; the progress of development of a baby's independent life systems, from lungs to temperature regulation to the all critical phases of brain development...more
Emily Shaver
Mar 15, 2014 Emily Shaver rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: medical students
Recommended to Emily by: HOSA
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Jen
This book isn't what I hoped it would be. Wolfberg focuses more on the medical aspects of the story, including the development of the Brigham and Women's NICU and the research being done on CP, than he does on what it is like as a father of a baby in the NICU. Should I have expected this from the title? Yes, and I did know that it wasn't all his story, but I did hope he would tie his own experiences into the book more seamlessly. This book has a great deal of physiology and medical terminology (...more
Zoe
May 16, 2012 Zoe rated it 5 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2012
Library book, actual pages.
This book is amazing - a perfect combination of research, journalism and personal experience. Having been through the NICU circus (twice) there was much that was familiar in his descriptions of NICU culture. There were unexpected moments when a sob would escape me before I even realized I was crying. The theme of parental rights and who does this baby actually belong to, me or the hospital, were very familiar. There was so much history of neonatal care that was new to...more
Tricia Stream
Fragile Beginnings: Discoveries and Triumphs in the Newborn ICU is not an easy read.

Told from the perspective of Dr. Adam Wolfberg, both a perinatologist and preemie dad, the pages are filled with emotional triggers to send me back to my own NICU experience. His daughter, Larissa, was born at 26 weeks when her mother suddenly went into labor. She then suffered a Grade IV brain bleed. (Larissa, not her mom.)

http://www.streamdoubletrouble.com/20...
Brian Cole
This is a personal story about how the author (a physician) and his wife (a psychologists?) undergo the heart rending experience of giving birth to a premature baby. It tells of their time in the nicu and of their dughters trials to achieve the benchmarks in childhood like riding a bike. Sometimes the nicu experience ends in a tragedy. The nurses are the key. Exactly how I like my science books--facts and anecdotes interwoven around a personal story.
Carolyn
This was a thought-provoking, well-balanced book about medical advances. The author provides the perfect mix of narrative along with scientific tidbits to keep the book flowing. He describes ethical issues without hyperbole. As modern science advances and keeps people alive longer, our society needs more authors like Dr. Wolfberg who can look at all sides of an issue and are not afraid to tackle tough issues.
Rebecca
This was a well-written book with insights from the author's own life (he is a pediatric fellow whose youngest daughter was born at 26 weeks and spent significant time in the nicu) as well as readable explanations of concepts in neurology such as neuroplasticity and constraint-induced movement therapy. I would not recommend this book if you are currently pregnant as it's pretty intense reading.
Jenni V.
I was absorbed in the first 2 chapters, then it went downhill as the author reverted from his experience as a father back to his medical background, causing the book to read like a clinical study. Not the book I expected.
Megan
It was ok, a bit dry. I thought there would be more description of the day-to-day NICU life. Some of the medical terminology was way over my head even though I am usually pretty interested in medical stories.
Amanda Racanelli
Wonderfully and personally written, yet scientific at the same time. Even though I read this for work; I found myself enjoying each page of heart-warming triumphs this family went through with their 26-weeker!
Haley Burden
This book... Oh gosh just thinking about it makes me tear up.
I can't explain that this book is so life changing you just must read it.
Love love love love love love love love love love love love love
kelly
I know it is about the author's experience with the NICU - but I wish he had been able to follow up with other babies born at that time a little more thoroughly....
Tracy
A little disjointed and I wanted more of the author's own story of his daughter's prematurity but a good look at the history and scientific developments of NICUs.
Meg
Mar 26, 2012 Meg added it
It had a lot of interesting scientific discussion, but it started very personal, then jumped around as to what was happening w/ his preemie daughter....
Shannon
Great insight to the world of premature babies and their parents! I learned quite a bit from this book!
Noble Gill
Fascinating story with lots of information about preemie medicine.
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Dr. Adam Wolfberg is an obstetrician specializing in maternal-fetal medicine at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, and is an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Tufts University School of Medicine. His clinical interests include prenatal diagnosis, fetal ultrasound, and preterm labor. Dr. Wolfberg's clinical research on fetal EKG analysis is funded by the National Institutes of Health...more
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