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The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui

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3.85 of 5 stars 3.85  ·  rating details  ·  688 ratings  ·  22 reviews
In this savage and witty parable written in exile in 1941, Brecht recasts the rise of Hitler as a small-time Chicago gangster's takeover of the city's greengrocery trade. This prizewinning translation by Ralph Manheim skilfully captures the wide range of parody and pastiche in the original - from Richard III to Al Capone, from Mark Antony to Faust - without diminishing the ...more
Paperback, 123 pages
Published September 3rd 1981 by Methuen Modern Plays (first published 1941)
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Mélanie
I read this because I was obliged to, but I can tell I loved Brecht's parallelism. Having read various biographies of Hitler, this was supposed to be no different, but instead this was definitely my favourite. It must have been the wit, the characters, even the catchy setting or the language used. My personal favourite bit is when Ernesto Roma tells him (read it in Albanian so the following is my adaption) "Step on the world, but not on your same feet", inferring Ui's betrayal to him, as part of ...more
Realini
The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui by Bertold Brecht
Der aufhaltsame Aufstieg des Arturo Ui

Spoiler alert: I will not give you away the finale, the author does. He thinks the Ascension can be stopped. But since I did not enjoy what I heard of the play, I am likely to write about anything except Brecht.
There have been a small series of accidents, books that I did not enjoy.
With Zhivago and Prometheus Bound, there is he Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui.
Yes, the message is worthy and the title, from where
...more
علی
صعود مقاومت پذیر آرتور اویی، 1941، اگرچه به مافیای شیکاگو در دهه ی سی میلادی و قدرت گرفتن آرتور اویی با از میان بردن رقبا می پردازد، در واقع مربوط به جامعه ی آلمان و رشد نازیسم و قدرت گرفتن هیتلر می پردازد، فاجعه ای که برشت معقتد است قابل پیش گیری بود. سوای آرتور اویی که تمثیلی ست از هیتلر، "ارنستو رما"ی قوزی، داگسبورو، امانوئل گیری، جوزپه گیولا و... هرکدام یکی از همدستان هیتلر نظیر هیندنبرگ، گوریگ و گوبلز را نمایندگی می کنند.
اغلب اثار برتولد برشت به فارسی برگردانده شده؛ "سقراط مجروح" کیکاووس جه
...more
Allison
I won't even attempt a discussion of the meaning or message of this play...much wiser people have already done so. But. I do feel qualified to mention the language of the play. Which I adore.

It is written in an incredibly ambiguous style - block quotes from Shakespeare are followed closely by stellar examples of Chicago dialect. No one character completely avoids some shining bit of oration, whether it's a brilliant adaption of Shakespeare or a biting one-liner.

And interestingly, none of the c
...more
Harry Boyd
Bertolt Brecht was a genius. This play is fantastic, I couldn't talk about all the reasons why I think this because there are just too many. To list a few, the parallels between the play and the rise of Hitler in the Weimar Republic are masterfully presented and very true to real historical events. All Brecht's qualities like spass, the alienation effect, demonstration of characters and presentation to spectators are all present here. But the best thing about it is what the title suggests, Artur ...more
Cecilia
This parable about Hitler's rise to power as a gangster in Chicago is enjoyable and interesting. It's about Hitler's earlier power grabs that you don't hear about as much because of all the even more awful stuff he did later. I'm not sure this would be a interesting play to stage anymore, but it says something about Brecht and his relationship to Germany, Hitler and American Gangster movies. He wrote before America entered WWII. The most striking omissions I think are any race or nationalism iss ...more
Loren Harway
Sep 18, 2007 Loren Harway rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: history/drama enthusiasists
Fascinating, a keen insight into the mind of Bertolt Brecht.
It's like reading a distorted history of the pre-WWII in Germany. Fortunately there is a translator key at the back of the book which tells us who the characters are meant to be; Ui-Hitler etc.
I found it a little inconclusive, at the very least confusing.
Brecht's continuous efforts to create a lack of empathy for the characters can be found to be annoying as it means the play doesn't run as smoothly as we would like.
Good play from a lea
...more
Sammy
Read, performed and watched in Ms. Gelfand's drama class
Elliott
"In this savage and witty parable written in exile in 1941, Brecht recasts the rise of Hitler as a small-time Chicago gangster's takeover of the city's greengrocery trade. This prizewinning translation by Ralph Manheim skilfully captures the wide range of parody and pastiche in the original - from Richard III to Al Capone, from Mark Antony to Faust - without diminishing the horror of the real-life Nazi prototypes." I wish I could say I came up with that myself.
Tyler Jones
I read this close on the heals of a biography of Hitler and found that Brecht did a great job using this parable to show how the rise of Hitler came about.

The epilogue is chilling:

Therefore learn how to see and not to gape.
To act instead of talking all day long.
The world was almost won by such an ape!
The nations put him where his kind belong.
But don't rejoice too soon at your escape -
The womb he crawled from is still going strong.
Katie
For a book that I have to read for class it was very enjoyable. The idea of taking something something as huge as the nazi's rise to power and placing it in a setting of something so dull as the power of cauliflower selling. I particularly loved the epilogue "But do not rejoice too soon at your escape — The womb he crawled from is still going strong."
Helena Wang
awesome. So clever… the epilogue is especially chilling.
g026r
Probably one of the least subtle of Brecht's works, with placards between scenes explaining the connection between the actions shown on stage and Hitler's rise to power.

That said, it's still a decent play.
Ali
This play is fun. On the one hand is like watching a Godfather movie, but at the same time it gives a very educating view of the begginings of nazism.
überwältigend!
Jeremy Hatfield
Read this as part of my Master's Thesis. I find Brecht's wit second to none in 20th century German literature.
Alex
Do you ever wonder what Hitler might be like as a Chicago gangster who monopolized the cauliflower racket? Me too.
Bryan
Hitler re-imagined as Chicago gangster. What else might you want?
Brooke
This was a chore to read. I bet it would be fun to watch, though.
T.M.
This is one to read, every election year.
Meredith
Another book for school.
Alison
Alison marked it as to-read
Dec 24, 2014
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Bertolt Brecht (born Eugen Berthold Friedrich Brecht) was a German poet, playwright, and theatre director. A seminal theatre practitioner of the twentieth century, Brecht made equally significant contributions to dramaturgy and theatrical production, the latter particularly through the seismic impact of the tours undertaken by the Berliner Ensemble—the post-war theatre company operated by Brecht a ...more
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“Therefore learn how to see and not to gape.
To act instead of talking all day long.
The world was almost won by such an ape!
The nations put him where his kind belong.
But don't rejoice too soon at your escape -
The womb he crawled from is still going strong.”
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