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Le imprese di Sherlock Holmes
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Le imprese di Sherlock Holmes (Los archivos de Baker Street)

4.40  ·  Rating Details  ·  24,482 Ratings  ·  67 Reviews
Storie apocrife del grande detective.
Gioielli favolosi misteriosamente scomparsi, incredibili angeli neri presaghi di sventure, mostri orrendi, raffinati strumenti di tortura rendono più complessa ed eccitante, più affascinante e misteriosa una realtà che quasi sembra divertirsi a nascondere la propria essenza. Solo l'intervento di Sherlock Holmes ce ne scopre d'improvviso
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Paperback, 207 pages
Published 1966 by Oscar Mondadori (first published 1954)
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Tarma riv·et·ing
adjective \ˈri-və-tiŋ\

: very exciting or interesting

Synonyms
absorbing, arresting, consuming, engaging, engrossing, enthralling,…more
riv·et·ing
adjective \ˈri-və-tiŋ\

: very exciting or interesting

Synonyms
absorbing, arresting, consuming, engaging, engrossing, enthralling, fascinating, gripping, immersing, intriguing, involving, interesting

Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictio...(less)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Riju Ganguly
Jan 09, 2012 Riju Ganguly rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This collection of apocryphal Sherlockiana has a special status: the stories herein are the first "authorised" pastiches that came out after the demise of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The rarest of rare collection og pastiches & parodies, edited by Ellery Queen, had been ruthlessly suppressed by Adrian Conan Doyle. Perhaps to amend the situation, or more accurately, perhaps to encash upon the public demand for more Holmes stories, he had collaborated with one of the greatest writers of mystery: J ...more
Richard Hemingway
I must confess that when I read this collection of short stories over 30 years ago, I missed out on one tiny little detail. These stories weren’t written by Arthur Conan Doyle they were written by his son Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr. This was during the period where I was reading four or five novels a week. So when I read this book, I felt that it was okay, but nothing special. Before the short stories there is a section called “Always Holmes’, if I read that section, this book wou ...more
Michael
This was probably the first anthology of Sherlock Holmes pastiches that I ever read back in the dim and murky past when dinosaurs walked the Earth in mortal terror of Doug McClure. Basil Rathbone was still my main source of Holmes with most of Conan Doyle senior's stories still not having a place on my bookshelves. So now that all those brilliant works by dear Arthur are all indelible features of my memory, perhaps it's time I revisited his son's attempts to recreate his father's style with the ...more
Rozonda
Oct 30, 2011 Rozonda rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Years ago, I read Adrian Conan Doyle's "Tales of Love and Hate" and I was appalled at the lack of talent of the son of such a gifted writer. I hoped that Dickson Carr, a wonderful mystery writer,would add the necessary talent to these Sherlockian pastiches. I was wrong. The stories are not badly written but they betray the Holmesian spirit in more than one way. Watson is minimized as a vehicle more than as a friend; Holmes' misogyny, which did not despise women but feared and respected them, in ...more
Suyash Kumar
Adrian Conan Doyle has done nothing to demonstrate that he has inherited his father's intellect.
The stories are unexceptional and quite mediocre. Every single story has the following elements ever present that make reading quite monotonous:
1. Holmes observing people and thus figuring out their profession or there earlier whereabouts followed by Watson and any other person in their company giving a 'start'. Mind you it's always a start. It's never amazement or shock or fascination. It's always a
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Barbm1020
Feb 07, 2016 Barbm1020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: dnf
These stories are very authentic in tone and plot, and the characters remain as Doyle created them. I did find it jarring to revisit that world and that style, and as good as they are, I wasn't ready for a journey that far into the past and didn't finish the book. I recommend it for true blue fans.
Qube
Dec 08, 2014 Qube rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It is interesting that the Goodreads rating for this is higher than most of the original works. It wonder if it is due to the nostalgia of reliving the joys of reading works of the master.

The writing recaptures the original atmosphere, and the language is very close to Arthur Conan Doyle's. For that, it was a delight reading this collection. The quality of the mysteries, however, fell a little short. I found them shallower than the originals.

Regardless, this is volume worth reading and even pres
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Kristina
Jan 15, 2016 Kristina rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sherlockiana
In some ways this reads like fan-fiction, in that it tries too hard to recall the original stories. At times this is almost direct quoting of the text ("I thought for the moment that you had done something clever"), at others mimicry ("I would draw your attention to the fireplace chair" - "But there is no fireplace chair" - "That is why I draw your attention to it") All this means it does not feel original
The stories themselves are familliar to Doyle's original fans. For example, 'The Deptford H
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Rachel
Jun 08, 2015 Rachel rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Virtually identical in tone, atmosphere, and character to the original canon. The inclusion of three or four copycat stories (the plots were derived so heavily from canon that they are more or less identical, as in my notes) detract somewhat from an otherwise charming book.
Dox
Jan 08, 2011 Dox rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2011
If you like the original Sherlock Homes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, then these are a great extension of those stories, written by his son, Adrian Conan Doyle. The style and substance are so similar that it is really hard to tell that they aren't of the original batch. The most fun part about it is that these stories are the ones referenced to in the original stories, but never told--those teaser announcements by Watson where he casually mentioned some other case they had been on--these are th ...more
Cathrine Bonham
Really based more on the fame of his fathers original stories than on the stories themselves, this collection of twelve new Sherlock Holmes stories featuring a deer-stalker wearing, pipe smoking, and "Elementary" saying Holmes were fun to read.

Each of these new Holmes adventures was based on a one sentence reference to an unwritten case found within Arthur Conan Doyle's Original Holmes stories.

I have to say that Adrian has done a wonderful job of keeping with the voice, Style, and Deductive reas
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Jayaprakash Satyamurthy
The edition I have only contains the stories by Adrian Conan Doyle. They range from squibs in which Holmes seems to breeze in and solve a case in a day or so to more ambitious and exciting stories. The plots are all siblings or close cousins to various canonical stories, but manage to convey the atmosphere of the Baker Street world quite well. While not half the writer his father was, Adrian Doyle is at least not at abysmal a writer as Brian Herbert, another writer who has drawn from the well of ...more
Sudar Muthu
Adrian Conan Doyle tries to live up to the expectations created because of his father and I feel that he has done a good job.

My only complaint is that in all the stories he tries to stick with his father's style as much as possible which kind of looks redundant after some time. It would had been nice if he tried to add his own style into it, instead of just trying to imitate his father's style.

Inspite of all of this I still enjoyed the book, since I could never get enough of Sherlock Holmes ;)
ELK
Apr 23, 2016 ELK rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery, fiction
Adrian Conan Doyle might have been milking his father's legacy for an extra buck, but these non-canonical mysteries are still solid and entertaining. The collection is true to the tone of the original stories, without inappropriate additions or incongruous actions by any of the characters. Good bedtime reading.
Isabella
Jan 15, 2014 Isabella rated it it was ok
Peccato, le storie sono tutte scopiazzate dal canone originale.
A questo punto mi chiedo se sia fatto apposta oppure no...
M
Jan 24, 2015 M rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Despite the names of the authors, this is just an okay read. The Deptford Horror by Adrian Conan Doyle is the best in the book, with pacing and wording very much in the style of his father. I read it decades ago and always thought it was one of Sir Arthur's, so I've often wondered why I couldn't find it in the Holmes canon. Having read it again recently, I now realize that it's basically just a retelling of The Speckled Band, with a different horrid creature. I still liked that story, but the re ...more
Akhil
Mar 01, 2014 Akhil rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This work is ok
S,
May 20, 2014 S, rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: crime-mystery
At first I was a bit doubtful, as the fanfiction nature of these stories seemed to seep through quite strongly to my liking, but as I read on, I started to enjoy them a great deal and was lured into their world, their take on Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson.

However, I read this in Finnish and the translation was quite a bad one: the word "detective" had been translated as "salapoliisi" no matter which character it was used for (clearly the translator hadn't done his research concerning the ran
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Yingtai
May 04, 2014 Yingtai rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
It did feel fairly authentic ... but ... the characters weren't as *nice* as the originals. The most striking thing was the women. I know there were a disproportionate number of beautiful and charming women in the original, but here every single one was beautiful, and a whole lot of them were fainting flowers, with only the occasional dignified aristocrat for variety. The one and only woman who was not lovely in her way was portrayed as a horribly bossy Scotswoman. The originals were nothing lik ...more
Abby
Mar 03, 2012 Abby rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
The trouble I have with the stories in this book is that they're a little too derivative of the stories of the Sherlock Holmes canon. There's not much new here. For example, "The Abbas Ruby" reads like a less clever "Blue Carbuncle," with the ending borrowing from "The Naval Treaty." "The Dark Angels" is a less convincing "Dancing Men." "The Deptford Horror" is an even more outlandish version of "The Speckled Band," and no few of the stories lift lines wholesale from the original text.

The storie
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Lesley
May 10, 2012 Lesley rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery, fiction
The trouble I have with the stories in this book is that they're a little too derivative of the stories of the Sherlock Holmes canon. There's not much new here. For example, "The Abbas Ruby" reads like a less clever "Blue Carbuncle," with the ending borrowing from "The Naval Treaty." "The Dark Angels" is a less convincing "Dancing Men." "The Deptford Horror" is an even more outlandish version of "The Speckled Band," and no few of the stories lift lines wholesale from the original text.

The storie
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David Allen
These authorized pastiches from the 1950s hew fairly closely to the original stories, sometimes too closely, in that a lot of effects are repeated. But then, Doyle was formulaic himself by the end, and the formula is as comfortable as slippers and a fire. Watson is more dim here, unfortunately, and there are more murders than in Doyle, but overall these are enjoyable.
Kay
Feb 05, 2016 Kay rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery
This book was well-written, but I was not as enthralled with it as the first Sherlock Holmes book I read. A lot of interesting mysteries, nonetheless.
Usama Tariq
Sep 19, 2014 Usama Tariq rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is indeed one of the best and my favourite writer! Such Imagination and ability to express his thoughts! Love Sherlock <3
Ren
May 23, 2015 Ren rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Paint by numbers Holmes pastiche is my literary comfort food. Just lovely.
Tom Antonellis
Feb 08, 2011 Tom Antonellis rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
ANY Sherlock Holmes book makes me happy but I, of course, enjoy most the stories written most like Arthur Conan Doyle. I feel this book does a great job. I enjoyed visiting with Holmes and Watson in this book co-authored by Adrian Conan Doyle, Arthur's son -- though I suspect there's a chance his name is included for name-recognition value. I'm not sure if he did the lion's share of the writing. There's a 'Dracula' sequel written by a descendant of Bram Stoker and a collaborator where I have the ...more
Read1000books
Defined most simply, a pastiche is a story written by one author using the characters created by another; for example if Mark Twain had written a story featuring Dickens' creation Ebenezer Scrooge. Here we have a terrific group of short mystery stories written by the son of Sherlock Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as well as famous mystery writer and Sir A.C.D biographer John Dickson Carr. Each story is based on a fleeting reference to it found in the original sixty stories featuring Holm ...more
Ronald
May 07, 2016 Ronald rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
nobody writes sherlock like sir arthur; read some time in 1992
Karl Øen
Mar 04, 2013 Karl Øen rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Probably the best among pastiches. The stories are all based on unchroniceled cases mentioned in the Canon. The two collaborators closely mimics Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's style and prose and rips off some of his plots as well. It will come as no surprise that, of the two writers, John Dickson Carr's plots are the more original, but Adrian Conan Doyle holds up suprisingly well. Though never the warmest of persons, the Holmes of these stories comes across as even a trifle colder than the original, ...more
Robin
Feb 01, 2016 Robin rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: sherlock-holmes
I enjoyed the book, but not more than other short story collections.
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Adrian Malcolm Conan Doyle was the youngest son of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his second wife Jean, Lady Doyle or Lady Conan Doyle. He had two siblings, sister Jean and brother Denis, as well as two half-siblings, sister Mary and brother Kingsley.
Adrian Conan Doyle has been depicted as a race-car driver, big-game hunter, explorer, and writer. Biographer Andrew Lycett calls him a "spendthrift playb
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More about Adrian Conan Doyle...

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