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Yellow Star
 
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Jennifer Roy
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Yellow Star

4.19  ·  Rating Details  ·  8,676 Ratings  ·  1,065 Reviews
A Holocaust survivor's experiences in the Lodz ghetto in Poland.
Nook, 254 pages
Published June 16th 2011 by Cavendish, Marshall Corporation (first published January 1st 2006)
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Alice My take on the free verse is to give voice to the story. The author tells us of her aunt's European accent, and I'm sure doing it in free verse form…moreMy take on the free verse is to give voice to the story. The author tells us of her aunt's European accent, and I'm sure doing it in free verse form gives it a little more of a flavor of an accent, and maybe even a halting, looking-for-the-right-words sort of feel. It was not difficult to read that way, though. It was not poetry.

I did not think it was gruesome. She did see people get shot, but she did not describe blood and guts and that sort of gruesomeness. (less)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Lisa Vegan
Dec 30, 2008 Lisa Vegan rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: highly, to so many readers 11 and all the way up
Recommended to Lisa by: Wendy
It sounds like such a cliché but I really could not put down this book, and I read it in one day; I don’t know how many hours it took but even though I read slowly, it wasn’t many. This book is riveting. I’ve read many fiction and non-fiction books about the Holocaust and this is now one of my favorites.

It’s a “based on truth” story, one of those fiction/non-fiction books.

The author interviewed her aunt, who was one of twelve children to survive the Lodz ghetto during the Nazi occupation in Wor
...more
Rebecca
In a nutshell: Not the most haunting or memorable read for me personally, but nonetheless an interesting true story told in verse

Syvia Perlmutter who was one of the twelve young Jewish survivors of the Lodz ghetto in Poland, and Jennifer Roy wrote this novel based on her aunt's recollections of the time. As both a reader of historical fiction and a student of history aspiring to be a historian, I'm drawn to different stories and perspectives. Not every experience of the Holocaust was the same,
...more
Ambs ❤❤
Apr 15, 2015 Ambs ❤❤ rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: stand-alone
This was an easy read if you mean that it was written in such a simple manner. A simple but gripping manner. This is a story of one of the only 12 children who survived in the Lodz ghetto during the Holocaust.

It is written by a descendent of the little girl, but written in her own words. As the women tells her story, she tells her story as if she is currently reliving the experience, in a child's voice. This makes this story evening more haunting and heartbreaking, which does not make this an ea
...more
Lori
Nov 19, 2013 Lori rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: memoir, historical
this is a memoir of the holocaust seen through the eyes of a child. Syvie was four when her family was taken by force by the Nazis and forced to live in a "ghetto" section of Poland. at first there were over 250,000 Jewish people who were there over five years later when they were rescued by the Russians, there were less than a thousand. Syvie was ten when the holocaust ended. This is her story. she tells us of her horrific memories of this horrific era. She is now in her seventies and lives in ...more
Wendy
Nov 18, 2008 Wendy rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Abigail A.
Shelves: wwii
Like some other true WWII stories written for children, this has been published as fiction; I'm not sure why.

I thought at first that the style was really going to annoy me (I wouldn't really call it free verse, myself, so much as just breaking up the lines), but after a couple of pages I got used to it. The voice is very believable as that of a child growing throughout the book from 4 years to 9 years. The story is simply told, but really stunning, especially in the second half. There's nothing
...more
Srividya
How does one go about reviewing a book that talks about one of the most horrifying times in the history of this world, I wonder? Also, I ask myself if I have the right to actually review this personal memoir of another individual? However, I believe that not saying anything about it would reduce the impact that this book has on the overall genre of post holocaust books. Therefore, here are my humble thoughts about this book.

This is a true life account of one of the child survivors of the Lodz gh
...more
Sara
Nov 15, 2009 Sara rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Melissa (ladybug)
"In 1945, the war ended. The Germans surrendered, and the ghetto (Lodz, Poland) was liberated. Out of more than a quarter of a million people, only about 800 walked out of the ghetto. Of those who survived, only twelve were children."
This book is the story of one of these children. Syvia was in the ghetto from age 4 to the day before her 10th birthday.

This book was formatted in a kind of free verse. It reminded me of poetry. Poetry of life and of horror. I read it in one day, but I had to take
...more
Steven Zachary
May 25, 2015 Steven Zachary rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2-own-audiobook
Required reading for any and all. Not only is it about the Holocaust (loosely) but it's about the experience of a child in the Holocaust.

it's heart breaking and heart wrenching so many times over. The father in this book is something else. Although the family as a whole persevere it is through the sheer and utter brilliance of the father who, time and time again, saves the family from sure death. He is a man for which we all have to aspire to be a fraction of in reality for in the worst possibl
...more
Lindsey
Jul 31, 2010 Lindsey rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: jewish, world-war-ii
SYDNEY TAYLOR HONOR BOOK (2007)

Format: Novel in free verse poetry
Age level: Middle school
Protagonist: Syvia, a young Jewish girl

Brief Summary: This is the true story of Syvia, a young Jewish girl in Poland during World War II, told by her niece. Syvia is about 4 years old when the war begins and 10 when it ends. She and her family were sent to the Lodz ghetto in Poland, and this is their story. Syvia's story offers a unique view of the Holocaust in that she spent the majority of the war in a ghe
...more
Holly
Mar 21, 2008 Holly rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is a fantastic Holocaust novel. The author wrote from the perspective of her aunt, who was one of 12 children to survive the Lodz ghetto in Poland. Her aunt was four and a half when she entered the ghetto, and ten when the liberation troops reached them. Roy has an amazing way of making the most simple statements incredibly gripping. The novel is written in poetic prose:
I wish I could
rip the star off
(carefully, stitch by stitch, so as not to ruin
my lovely coat),
because yellow is meant to be
...more
Julie
Written in free verse, this is a moving account of the experience of Syvia Perlmutter, one of only 12 children to survive the Lodz ghetto in Poland during World War II. It's written by a relative who was able to do extensive interviews with her. It's horrifying and haunting... as it should be. It's also absolutely incredible that Syvia's entire family was able to survive, in large part thanks to her father's quick thinking and that of the other ghetto survivors.

It's a thought-provoking read and
...more
Scott Townley
Jan 31, 2016 Scott Townley rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Out of 270,000 Jews moved into the Lodz ghetto in Poland in 1939, only 800 survived to the end of the war. Only 12 of those were children. This is the true story of one of those children, in verse novel form, told by Jennifer Roy, the survivor's niece. What happens to a young child, both innocent and only partially able to understand the big picture of war, when she is forced into a life requiring constant watchfulness and suspicion, where death is constantly only a day away? The child's perspec ...more
Grace
Feb 17, 2014 Grace rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: world-war-2
“In 1945, the war ended. The Germans surrendered, and the ghetto was liberated. Out of more than a quarter of a million people, only about 800 walked out of the ghetto. Of those who survived, only twelve were children. I was one of the twelve”

An excerpt from an interview with Sylvia Perlmutter, the prologue appropriately sets up the rest of the collections of poems based on real events from the author, Jennifer Roy’s aunt, Sylvia. Organized in chronological order, each poem feeds into the next,
...more
Syeda
Dec 05, 2011 Syeda rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
In the shocking, suspenseful book Yellow Star by Jennifer Roy, 4 year-old Syvia must be one of the luckiest girl in the world because she was one of the only 12 Jewish children who survived Holocaust. She grew up as a Jew during the time period of World War 2. She lives in a ghetto with her family with her two new friends Hava and Itka. The ghetto is full of diseases and thousands of other Jews. Afterwards Hava disappears after she took a short walk around the ghetto. Itka was forced to a train ...more
Maureen Kilroy Furtado
The author tells the true story of her Aunt Syvia's experiences in the Lodz Ghetto during the Nazi occupation of Poland. The slightly fictionalized story, re-created from her aunt's taped narrative, is related by Syvia herself as a series of titled vignettes that cover the period from fall, 1939, when she is four years old, until January 1945–each one recounting a particular detail-filled memory in the child's life (a happy-colored yellow star sewn on her favorite orange coat; a hole in the ceme ...more
Amanda
Jul 14, 2010 Amanda rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is a life changing book. The Holocaust is one of my favorite things to learn and read about. Although it is very heart breaking, there is just something inside me that wants to know more. This true story really brought out what remembering the holocaust is all about. I really enjoyed how Jennifer Roy told this story in poems. To me, that just made the book even more intense. Other people may think that the style of this book is "un-descriptive" and "boring", but when you really get to know ...more
Amy Rae
I really enjoyed this one, in great part because of the foreword from Jennifer Roy. Hearing the story of how the book came to be made reading it all the more interesting. And I appreciated the fact that Roy admits that she's always regarded the Holocaust as something frightening on a very personal level, enough so that she wasn't sure she would be able to write it.

That she's preserved a story from her family's history so eloquently is something to admire. The poetry really grabbed me, and I app
...more
Yvette
Apr 07, 2010 Yvette rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Bev Walkling
Books like this one always grab me by the heart, sadden me at such terrible stories and yet inspire me by the courage and strength of those who had so much going against them.This book is told by the niece of the main character and yet she uses the voice of the child - starting at age 4 1/2, so that the reader sees it from a child's viewpoint.

Sylvia (the main character) and her father, mother and older sister are all imprisoned in the Lodz ghetto.Life becomes increasingly difficult and orders co
...more
H
Apr 03, 2010 H rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2011-caudills
Syvia was just a little girl - 4 - when her family was forced into the ghetto in Lodz. 6 years later she walked out of the ghetto, one of only 12 children to survive the Nazis. This true story based on the experiences of Roy's aunt is easy to read, immediate and emotional. Written in "verse" (though I use that word very loosely) the book benefits from Roy's choice to use child-like and simple language to relate the story. More "poetic" language would have made a false note. One of the better and ...more
Carol Arnold
Aug 01, 2015 Carol Arnold rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The true story of a young Polish girl who was 4 years old when World War 2 began. She and her family survived life in a Polish ghetto. They were starved and exposed to the elements. Freezing in the winter and heat in the summer. The book is written in the first person by a niece of the "young Polish girl" who told her the story. It is a very short book, well written and interesting.
Krissy
Feb 19, 2016 Krissy rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
more than 5 stars are needed for Yellow Star! Profound first-person telling from young child's point of view (the author's aunt, whose life story this is), it's the story of one ghetto family that managed to narrowly avoid being sent to the death camps countless times. A beautiful story of the incredible power of love in the midst of atrocity.
Rich
Dec 27, 2014 Rich rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Outstanding short read (about 2 hours give or take. Written from a child's perspective on surviving a Polish Ghetto. So well done with the simplistic, naive perspective of trying to make sense of the horror. Highly recommend this book.
Jennifer Mangler
One of my students has been asking me to read this book for months, so I finally broke down and read it. I'm glad I did. It's an accessible book that sheds light on what it was like to live in a Jewish ghetto.
Tracy
Jan 18, 2016 Tracy rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book about the Jews locked inside the Lodz, Poland ghetto was a little different because it was from the point of view of a kid and was written very simply in short sentences. I can't imagine living through that!
Patricia Miller
May 01, 2015 Patricia Miller rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Very moving

This is one powerful read. Very well written. The strong faith of the Jewish people will never be equals. Sad that their persecution continues in other countries today.
Shariek Gohar
Oct 11, 2014 Shariek Gohar rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great read

Wow, you really feel like you know Syvia and her family. The horrific things they suffered during the Holocaust. But the will and desire to live is quite powerful.
Steph Campbell
Jan 03, 2016 Steph Campbell rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Read this is in one day, a very compelling read and in a style that was easy to manage. Such a beautiful and harrowing story but one that must be told.
Ryan
Feb 02, 2013 Ryan rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
What would the Holocaust be like for a little child? Surprising, upsetting, at parts joyful. Am I answering the question or describing the book? Told in free-verse poetry, Yellow Star details the experience of Syvia, a 5-year old Jewish girl in Lodz, Poland. You can guess some of the plot, but this book is pretty wonderful. For students, it is an excellent example of poetry that doesn't rhyme and poetry that takes the form of a narrative. You root for Syvia the entire way. At one point my wife a ...more
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“We must honor our differences while we find our own courage and our own strength the best we know how.” 4 likes
“Then there is the boy who talks out loud to himself and his only subject is food. This is what he sounds like— Meat, stew, potatoes, peppers, roasted turnips, spices, flour to thicken. Cook over low heat. Potato dumplings, edges browned, not burned. Ladle thick gravy on roast. Cabbage galumpkies, noodle kugel, Carrot cake with dates, finely chopped…” 1 likes
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