The Declaration
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The Declaration (The Declaration #1)

3.72 of 5 stars 3.72  ·  rating details  ·  12,921 ratings  ·  1,235 reviews
It's the year 2140 and Anna shouldn't be alive. Nor should any of the children she lives with at Grange Hall. The facility is full of kids like her, kids whose parents chose to recklessly abuse Mother Nature and have children despite a law forbidding them from doing so as long as they took longevity drugs. To pay back her parents' debt to Mother Nature, Anna will have to w...more
ebook, 320 pages
Published October 1st 2011 by Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (first published October 2nd 2007)
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Warnie B.
I normally love dystopian teen fic. And the premise of this one sounded fairly interesting. I just assumed I would really enjoy it. But right off the bat I was annoyed by the beginning--a nine-page-long diary entry. Such a lazy (and boring) way to give background information! I mean, diary entries CAN be done well, and written in a believable way. The ones in this book are not. A lot of times it's a case of telling instead of showing, which always makes events feel flat and not quite believable....more
Emily May
My opinion on this book swayed back and forth between 3 and 5 stars, so I eventually settled on 4 and I'm now going to do my best to explain why.

Why it got 4 stars
This book got 4 stars for being a highly original and intriguing story. I'm a real lover of dystopian societies, especially those set in a foreseeable future, and this is one unlike any other but with elements that are so cleverly woven with the current thoughts and fears that it makes it seem like a tragic possibility.

The book tells t...more
Karin
Would you make the choice to live forever even if it meant you wouldn't be allowed to have children? In the year 2140 most people do. In order to take Longevity, people have to sign the Declaration. People that choose to have children anyway are arrested and put in prison and the children are taken and put into something that resembles an orphanage. The children are referred to as Surplus.

Surplus Anna is one of the most promising occupants of Grange Hall, a bleak and cold housing unit for illega...more
Brandy
The premise: technology has advanced to the point that, with just two little capsules each day, everyone can live forever. Hooray! But if nobody's dying, the world is getting mighty crowded--so nobody is allowed to have babies anymore. Anna is a surplus, a kid born to a couple who did not Opt Out of the Declaration [apparently a legal document that says I Won't Have Children?]. So she's been shuffled off to Surplus Hall, where she learns menial housekeeping tasks to earn her keep in the world th...more
Maree
I think sometimes you can outstay your welcome.

The YA dystopian genre is almost exploding with books at the moment, but for me Malley’s The Declaration was probably the first I read. I read it when it was first released and I remember still being up at 1am, devouring it page by page until I finished it. Reading it second time around with one of my Goodreads friends and the feelings have pretty much been the same.

Set in a world where no one has to die of diseases or old age, surely everybody...more
Eva Leger
4.5 - Yikes. If there's anyone out there who thinks only the horror genre can scare them they need to pick this up.
I have a hard time with the classification of some books, YA in particular. Why is this YA? Because of the main characters? There are more than a few supporting non-teen characters. What are they? Nothing? I mean, I'm a decent ways past my teens and I can say that I'd recommend this more to adults than to teens. Now, I know more adults than teens so that may play a part, but it's a...more
Crystal
This book surprised me in a good way. I had expected to give it 3 stars, but in the end I had to give it an extra star for the huge twist that I never saw coming.
This book has the political view points of Unwind and the government pull of Hunger Games. During the story you find out what happens to the word when a drug company finds a way for people to stop the aging process and what has to be done in order to preserve resources. People are made to sign a declaration in which they promise to sto...more
Jackie
May 13, 2008 Jackie rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: bookclubs especially
This is teen targeted fiction published by Bloomsbury Children's Books, but the premise is so completely fascinating that I'd literally recommend this book to the 12 to 102 crowd with no reservations.

It's the year 2140 and the fountain of youth has come to the world by way of Longevity, a drug that literally lets
people live forever. But it's caused a problem--if everyone lives forever, the planet is going to fill up--FAST. The solution is to ban anyone on Longevity from having children, and bann...more
Aaron Vincent
Originally Posted On Guy Gone Geek.

It’s year 2140. Aging, lethal diseases such as cancer, AIDS, etc., and even death is no longer a problem, much thanks to the Longevity drugs. Mankind achieved what seemed to be the impossible, immortality. The world soon realized that this poses a problem. If no one will die and people keeps of reproducing, what will just happen to the limited resources of the planet? So they introduced the Declaration, an agreement a person have to sign that devoid them the ri...more
Flora Bateman
This story is set in a future world where people live forever making it illegal to have children because of overpopulation. Longevity drugs have made it possible for people to live forever but with this brings a tremendous strain on the world. We certainly get a look at life in such a world. A world where there are not children. Children that have been conceived illegally are taken to facilities where they are raised to be slaves for those that are legal. They are treated as surplus citizen and...more
Phoebe
In The Declaration, Gemma Malley creates a future where man has learned to cheat death, illness, and old age. But these miracles come with a price--those who chose to take the drug called "Longevity" are legally barred from reproduction. Surplus Anna is one of the unfortunate results of these laws. Illicitly born into a world with no room or resources to spare, she must prove her usefulness through her training at Grange Hall, a home for surplus children where beating, starvation, and humiliatio...more
Karen
This is not a terrible book but it's not great either. The writing seems more like a children's book but the content is young adult so that kind of bothered me. It started really really slowly, i felt like 'I get it already, She wants to be a good little surplus, surpluses are bad, just shut up and start the story already!'

I got so sick of all the over explaining of EVERYTHING - Things that could have easily been written into the plot or the reader could easily work out for themselves. It also...more
JuliaR
Dobrá kniha. Určitě bych ji doporučila spíše mladším čtenářům, i když je doporučena od patnácti. Třeba by to starší nemuselo bavit ale zase je tady ta stránka knihy, nad kterou se nedá docela dost dobře zamyslet. :)
Felicia A
WOW. I'm going to have to ruminate on this one before I write a review. Very different type of book.

UPDATED 9/14/10

Having ponderend it some.....I'd actually give this book a 4.5 - .5 of that being for the sheer innovativeness of the story. It wasn't an apocalypse, exactly, but life as we know it has ended. Well, for some, because the people in THIS story are living forever. A drug has been invented to allow people virtual immortality...or so it seems. Because of this, the earth has become crowde...more
Emma (BelleBooks)
The Declaration is set in the UK in the future. A future where resources are scarce and people live forever, thanks to the wonder drug Longevity. In order to be eligible to take Longevity, people have to sign the Declaration, stating they will never have any children...although there are some who have broken the rules. These children are called Surpluses, they are seen as a drain on precious resources and they need to work in order to replay their debt to society, and atone for the sins of their...more
Mark
Have just had a weekend of teen fiction though when I bought this book and ' I am number four' a few months ago I did not realize they were written for the younger end of the market. This is a cleverly chilling concept of society in which a drug called ' Longevity' has resulted in old age, or at least death, becoming something one opts into, bringing about the horrendous situation where children become as rare as hens' teeth and can only be born if the parent is prepared to die for them; a life...more
Petra Sýkorová
Co byste dělali, kdyby existovala možnost, jak zůstat navždy naživu? Sice byste museli dodržovat jistá pravidla, ale jinak byste si mohli užívat dle libosti. Dokázali byste to? Žít dlouho jen díky speciálním práškům? Chtěli byste patřit mezi Vyvolené?

Co když by to znamenalo, že si můžete pořídit pouze jedno dítě? Každé další totiž bude patřit mezi Přebytečné. Některé země se svých Přebytečných zbavují ihned po narození, jiné je umisťují do výchovných zařízení, aby z nich vychovali důstojné pomoc...more
Jennifer Wardrip
Reviewed by Natalie Tsang for TeensReadToo.com

C.S. Lewis, author of THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA, once wrote that there are three ways of writing for children. The first is to cater to what children want (but people seldom know what they want and this usually ends badly), the second develops from a story told to a specific child (Lewis Carrol's THE ADVENTURES OF ALICE IN WONDERLAND, for instance), and the third is that it is simply the best art form to convey the story.

Gemma Malley's debut young ad...more
Briana Grenert
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Angie
Set in the year 2140 when the world population subsists primarily on the drug Longevity, which holds aging at bay, this dystopian novel seemed just what the doctor ordered for a particularly stubborn reading slump. Couples are only allowed one child and any they have illegally after that are known as Surpluses. Surpluses are taken away from their parents and raised in a facility such as Grange Hall where our protagonist Surplus Anna resides. They are intended to learn how to be useful to society...more
April*procrastinator and proud*
pure awesomeness!!!
basically its about the future where they created these pills that make you look younger and live longer. sort of pauses you at the age you're at. It started out that you could only have 1 child because everthing was getting over populated, but that became too much so you couldn't have any children, unless you dont take the pill. But people who do take the pill and haave children have to give they're children up and got o jail, so its about Anna, she is a surplus (a child born...more
Evelin
recenzia: http://readandwatchlikeme.blogspot.cz...

Veľmi dobrá dystópia! Skvelý nápad, originalita sa autorke nedá odoprieť, len ku koncu sa mi zdalo akoby to chcela čo najrýchlejšie ukončiť. Asi len môj pocit, ale mne tam proste chýbalo, že už viac neboli v tom zvrátenom "sirotinci".
Hl. hrdinka mi bola neuveriteľne sympatická, čo všetko si musela vytrpieť a pritom držala jazyk za zubami a poslúchala. Pani Pincentová je poriadna hnusoba, ale nakoniec som ju chápala. Koniec bol plný prekvapení a...more
Dani
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Suši
W.O.W! Nebudu popírat, že mě knížka naprosto uchvátila, četla se rychle, lehce a příjemně, téma se mi moc líbilo, bylo to zase něco originálnějšího a novějšího. Je napsána jednoduchým stylem, při kterém nemusíte nad ničím příliš přemýšlet a jen se nechat unášet příběhem.
Celkově jsem z Deklarace opravdu unešená, škoda, že není pokračování, ale i tak si myslím, že konec byl naprosto supr! :)
Donna {Book Passion for Life}
DNF. Got to about 80 pages and just didn't feel connected to the characters. This is my second book by this author that I didn't like, so I guess she just isn't for me. =(
Michelle Arrow
"She opened the book and began to read. As she worked her way through the first few pages, her eyes widened with indignation. But she couldn't read it all now."

Well, here's another book that was recommended to me that really ended up sucking. I really expected this book to be good--especially because it's a dystopia science-fiction romance. It definitely sounded like my type of book that I could've end up loving. And for that...



It's the future, and in 2140 in a post-apocalyptic world, Anna rea...more
Anna Pavlíčková
Dystopie - žánr, který začínám mít čím dál víc ráda...!
Nemulain
O sonu yediririm sana Gemma! :(
Kat Heckenbach
I like dystopian novels, and I thought this one would be different. The idea of humans discovering a Longevity drug and that people must decide between near-immortality and having children intrigued me. But a quarter of the way through we have determined that Anna is a well-behaved and completely brainwashed Surplus, living an isolated life, and not much else. Peter comes into the story to tell her things aren't what she believes, and all that really happens at first is a rehashing of what's alr...more
Becky
The Declaration is a gritty, believable exploration of the future of humanity.


Anna is a Surplus. She is one of many. She lives in Grange Hall. An institution that prepares Surpluses for a life of servitude. Anna is a Surplus because her parents were selfish. They signed The Declaration and yet they had a child anyway. In the future world of this novel children are a burden to society. They are unnecessary and a drain on the world’s resources. How did this change come to be? Humanity discovered...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
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  • The Unidentified
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  • Tankborn (Tankborn, #1)
  • Scored
  • Restoring Harmony
  • Epitaph Road
  • The Sky Inside (The Sky Inside, #1)
  • The Secret Under My Skin
  • Famished
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  • 20 Years Later
  • The Silenced
  • Human.4 (Point 4, #1)
  • Candor
  • The Third
  • The Other Side of the Island
  • Fast-Tracked (Fast-Track Trilogy, #1)
The Resistance (The Declaration, #2) The Legacy (The Declaration, #3) The Killables (The Killables, #1) The Returners The Disappearances (The Killables, #2)

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“He said that we belonged together because he was born with a flower and I was born with a butterfly and that flowers and butterflies need each other for survival.” 140 likes
“Because no one needs to live for ever. I think that sometimes you can outstay your welcome.
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