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Shadows in Flight (Ender's Shadow, #5)
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Shadows in Flight (Ender's Shadow #5)

3.68 of 5 stars 3.68  ·  rating details  ·  7,637 ratings  ·  814 reviews
Ender’s Shadow explores the stars in this all-new novel...

At the end of Shadow of the Giant, Bean flees to the stars with three of his children--the three who share the engineered genes that gave him both hyper-intelligence and a short, cruel physical life.The time dilation granted by the speed of their travel gives Earth’s scientists generations to seek a cure, to no avai...more
Hardcover, 237 pages
Published January 17th 2012 by Tor Books
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Community Reviews

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Kaitlynn
What could have been an epic reunion between Bean and Ender that wraps up the final mysteries of both Anton's Key and the language/biology of the Descoladores instead quickly spirals into a blatant re-hash of previous works, except without the depth and psychology of the original novels.

We begin on the generation ship Bean and his 3 Anton-turned children fled earth upon. The children, two boys and a girl, are named Ender, Sergeant, and Carlotta. Sergeant is overly vicious and desperate for appro...more
Michael
Over time, the Ender novels have become a series of diminishing returns. Orson Scott Card breathed a bit of new life into the series by going back to its roots and examining the saga from Bean's point of view, but after five books I find myself once again suffering series fatigue.

The latest installment Shadows In Flight isn't necessarily a terrible book. It's just a pale shadow (pun fully intended) of the first novels in this series. Bean and three of his children have launched themselves into t...more
Vivian
Submitting this review of "Shadows in Flight - Enhanced Ebook edition" as a warning to those interested in purchasing this novel for their ebook readers. First, the enhanced edition has pretty pictures, which are illegible on typical black-and-white ereaders. Second, the enhanced edition is an abridged version of the hardcover novel, with less than half the text of the paper version. Third, the "non-abridged" version of the original is only available as an ebook as of 2013. And fourth, I paid th...more
Rich
I read the book in one sitting. It's very thin and has lots of space between the lines on a page. It was more of a novella than a novel. That being said, it should probably have been a short story. Maybe a longish short-story.

I'm a big fan of the Ender series and Orson Scott Card in general but there was nothing to this story for me.

It was a travelling story where (and I'm going to not spoil anything here so bear with my vagueness) some people are going from point A to points unknown and they s...more
Brian
Shadows in Flight by Orson Scott Card, as reviewed here is an uncorrected proof of a book that will be published in January, 2012. This novel does not have a stand-alone plot. Card is tying up one of the last loose ends in the universe that he first created in Ender’s Game back in 1985.

Picking up where he left off, Orson Scott Card immediately reminded me why I was drawn to his writing originally. A true “Hard Sci-Fi” novel, is centered around a plausible and explained future. Card proves himsel...more
Bet Roberts
At the end of Shadow of the Giant, I couldn't wait for this one to be released. That was a couple years ago, and when I heard that it was finally written, I pre-ordered it. I'd been disappointed in Ender in Exile, but that hadn't been terrible (just forgettable). I was excited to see how this finally ended, and hoped Mr. Card had returned to form.

Dear Lord, were those hopes misplaced. I noticed right away that the book was short. I don't have it in front of me, but I think it barely reaches 300...more
Mitch
The best Ender sequel since Ender’s Shadow. This book is closer to an extended short story than a full novel, but I liked it better than any of the novel sequels to Ender’s Shadow because, starting with Shadow of the Hegemon, this series sort of lost its way, becoming more about geopolitics than the character driven stories that made Ender’s Game and its immediate sequels so great, as the character development and character moments, while still there, took a back seat to warmongering and wartime...more
Andrew Kurth
Shadows in Flight
Orson Scott Card

-Julian Delphiki, Bean and Giant-- The father of Cincinnatus, Carlotta and Ender
-Carlotta-daughter of Julian, with the intelligence to pass any engineering degree
-Cincinnatus-son of Julian, one of the greatest military minds in the known world
-Ender Delphiki, son of Julian, smart enough to earn a doctorate


-Shadows in Flight starts when Julian and his three kids leave Earth forever, in a starship traveling near lightspeed. Julian, and his three kids, have a certai...more
Denise Eggleston
I won this book through Goodreads First Reads. I've entered more of the giveaways than I care to admit, and this was my first win. My only problem; this is Book 5 of a six part series. I have never read the first books or even the Ender's Game books also by Orson Scott Card that preceded this series.

So, I read synopses of each book on Wikipedia, which gave me enough background to understand what I was reading. Despite my ignorance of Card's arguably most famous books, I still enjoyed reading it....more
Chance Maree
May 22, 2012 Chance Maree rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Readers of the Ender series
First off, the sci-fi element is grand. Wonderful detail concerning mechanical and biological systems, as well as logistical solutions. Well written and easy to read and understand.

Second, OSC had to write genius interior and exterior dialogue - some from adolescent POVs. That could be difficult to pull off, but I bought it. Some of the quips were funny.

I'll stop counting now -- reading sci-fi stimulates my left brain. I have read most of the Ender series, so this installment made sense and ad...more
Alex Tamayo
This book had to be written, I get that. And I had to read it, not denying it, but it is so short, and really just such a... fall from the rest of the series, I kind of wish it was not written.

I love the Shadow series. They are a very interesting departure from regular science fiction and feature one of the greatest science fiction characters I have ever read, but this book does the series an injustice. This may seem contradictory, but this ending was written solely to end the series.

Sequels sho...more
John Slife
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Sam Blake
I was thoroughly prepared for the possibility that this book might not be as good as the incomparable Ender's Game, the masterful Ender's Shadow, or the other books in the Shadow series.

I was not at all prepared for the actuality that this book was not only awful in its own right, it actually retcons the original books to the point of making them worse by association.

No one who loves Ender's Game should read this book under any circumstances.
Caroline
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
John Keegan

It's almost ridiculous to call this a true novel. It barely qualifies as a novella. Imagine taking a normal length Enderverse novel, cutting out all of the characterization and most of the plot details, and calling it a new volume in the saga. That's more or less what this book is, and it's ludicrous that the book is being sold at full price.

Unlike the previous books in the "Shadow" arc, Bean might as well be absent, for all that his character does very much. He becomes important towards the end...more
Patrick
Lots of spoilers here, though I leave out some specifics. Fair warning.

I have to admit to very mixed feelings on this one. I love Bean. I wanted more Bean. BUT...I can see why Card had to mostly move on to the lives of the children. So it's bittersweet to get the bits of Bean perspective we do.

This was definitely not what I expected--a character study of immature geniuses trapped on a small ship. I hadn't expected Bean to be so big and trapped in the cargo hold to stay alive. I just hadn't expec...more
Christina
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Benjamin Thomas
This is a short novel; only about half of a standard OSC novel so was a pretty quick read. It centers around Bean and his three children, all of whom share the same genetic defect that he has, an inability to stop growing in size, thus rendering the body too large for the organs to support and thus dooming them to early deaths. I found the first 3rd of the book very hard to get through as it focuses on the children who are whiny geniuses. I feel it's probably very accurate in the way 6 year old...more
Brooke
Looking at the reviews for Shadow of the Giant, it's clear that a lot of people thought that it was the last book in the Shadow series. It really should have been, because this was a disappointing footnote. It's more of a novella than a novel, and it doesn't really serve any new purpose in the Ender's Game universe. The writing is really clunky and juvenile, and it seems to be Card's way to make sure that we really, really understand the messages that his other books were trying to tell us. Ther...more
Peter
There probably isn't a book in the Ender's Game series that I won't read and enjoy. This one is no exception. That being said, this book exemplifies some of my frustrations with the "Shadow" branch of the Ender series. OSC uses the Shadow branch as a means of changing the story in the Ender series and this book includes some of the most radical changes yet. Perhaps it's because I feel closer to Ender, who seems more real, more human, and more sympathetic than Bean, that I am protective of the En...more
Christie
I wasn't sure if this was the book that was supposed to tie the Ender and Shadow serieses together. (It's not.) I'm glad I read it since it ties up some loose ends, but I expect so much better from OSC.

-I felt like Bean's three kids were just a rehash of Ender, Valentine and Peter, which felt unoriginal and like a ripoff.
-The ending felt really rushed.
-I skimmed over all technobabble, which is surprising for me. I could not get into it at all.
-I missed having the intros to each chapter.
-The book...more
Jennie
This is another of the sort of follow up books to the Ender/Shadow series. It is a direct sequel to Shadow of the Giant. It follows Bean and his three antonine/leguminote children (meaning the children with the same genetic abnormality as Bean) on their near lightspeed flight through space. I didn't like it as much as I liked Ender in Exile, but it was definitely fun to read another story set in one of my favorite fictional universes. It felt more like experiencing a set length of time in their...more
Victoria
I haven't enjoyed the last few additions to this series, but I can't tell whether that's because I've changed as a reader or because Card has milked this saga too far.

This novella felt extraordinarily repetitive: Bean's leguminote children (Ender, Carlotta and Sargeant) are little, supersmart versions of good ol' Ender, Valentine and Peter. We get new discoveries about the Formics that feel just like the old ones. I wish I cared. The ending was powerful but it doesn't make up for a very weak boo...more
Ellen
Oof, this was tough to read. I probably should have just stopped when I saw the large type and widely spaced lines that were clearly trying to stretch this story into something that looked like a novel. The story is about three of Bean's kids, the ones with Anton syndrome, and they are nothing but a recapitulation of the Peter/Valentine/Ender dynamic, right down to the Valentine being the only girl and the Ender actually being named Ender. Then it basically turns into a Noah's Ark tale that argu...more
Jaclyn Lamar
This book both exceeded my expectations and fell short of them at the same time. I started it hoping for something akin to Children of the Mind, a full-blown dramatic story with a lot going on at once. When I realized this was just a short between-books novella I saw a story of that magnitude was impossible. So given the constraints of the format I was pleased with what Card was able to accomplish. This work feels more like the original Ender's Game than any other book in the series save perhaps...more
Carolyn
A slow start, a misleading jacket description, way too short!, but a good addition to the Ender series.
K.D. Absolutely
I did not understand a good part of this book for two reasons: (1) this is just my third Ender book although I watch the movie adaptation of Ender's Game and I liked it but I guess those are not enough for me to understand the chronology of Ender's life; (2) my copy of this is an audiobook that I had to listen too while my mind drifted to my urgent works in the office and a lingering personal problem. So, my mind was not focused on driving and listening.

So, I did read the Wiki entries about the...more
Renato P. baquerizo
No leas esto si no has leído previamente los libros de la Saga de la Sombra


Dejamos atrás el mundo. Nos sometimos a los efectos relativistas y viajamos con 3 Newtons & Einsteins a un viaje aparentemente sin fin.

Nos topamos con algo inesperado y algo no tan inesperado.
Se acerca el final del tiempo, una carrera contra reloj. Una habichuela "Bean", Carlota, Andrew y Cincinatus. Herederos de una maldición y una bendición.

Hemos acompañado a Bean desde su no-nacimiento, desde que al primer año d...more
Jennifer Lynn
This was pretty perfect. I have to say I'm biased, as Bean has always been my favorite character in the Ender universe, and this brought some bittersweet closure to his story. As with everything about Bean, this final chapter is fittingly compelling, tragic, and brilliant.

I enjoyed meeting his children and their personalities, but I kind of felt like I was meeting the Wiggin kids all over again - aggressive Cinncinatus (Peter), peaceful Valentine (Carlotta), and analytical Ender (Ender). But eve...more
JoLynn
Bean and his three genius children are travelling through space at light speed in order to give themselves more time to find a cure for their genetic trait that causes giantism and short life span. Unfortunately, nothing promising has been discovered. Bean is at the end of his expected life span, and the children, although only 6 years old, are more than one-fourth of the way through theirs. Though the children are accomplished geniuses by six, they are also still children.

They encounter an ali...more
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Could the virus that turned Antons Key be the Descolada? 1 17 Mar 18, 2014 10:17PM  
The Sword and Laser: Shadows in Flight 1 29 Mar 07, 2012 08:47AM  
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Orson Scott Card is the author of the novels Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Speaker for the Dead, which are widely read by adults and younger readers, and are increasingly used in schools.
Besides these and other science fiction novels, Card writes contemporary fantasy (Magic Street, Enchantment, Lost Boys), biblical novels (Stone Tables, Rachel and Leah), the American frontier fantasy series Th...more
More about Orson Scott Card...
Ender's Game (The Ender Quintet, #1) Speaker for the Dead (The Ender Quintet, #2) Ender's Shadow (Ender's Shadow, #1) Xenocide (The Ender Quintet, #3) Children of the Mind (The Ender Quintet, #4)

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