Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Deserter (The Bone World Trilogy, #2)” as Want to Read:
The Deserter (The Bone World Trilogy, #2)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Deserter (The Bone World Trilogy #2)

3.76 of 5 stars 3.76  ·  rating details  ·  137 ratings  ·  29 reviews
To save his tribe, the cannibal Stopmouth must abandon it. Leaving the stone-age world of the Surface behind, he travels to the Roof, the mysterious hi-tech world suspended above. But the Roof has its own problems. The nanotechnology that controls it is collapsing. And now a rebellion against the ruling Commission is about to erupt.

Hunted by the Commission's nano-enhanced...more
Hardcover, 448 pages
Published March 13th 2012 by David Fickling Books (first published January 1st 2011)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The Deserter, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Deserter

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 718)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Ove
Going to the Roof to save his love

I became interested in this book when I researched new science fiction and fantasy releases for May and came across The Deserter book two of The Bone World Trilogy. The blurb sounded good and I like this kind of stories about segregated societies kept in the dark by technologically superior conspirators and how one of the deceived finally starts to learn the truth. I immediately bought The Inferior and you can read my review here. This is my review of the Desert...more
Giselle at BO-OK NERD Canada
Stopmouth is back and is in dire need of answers. His goal? To save his tribe, and to find his wife who has gone missing. In order to do that, he must head to the Roof. While there, he finds a boy and an old woman and together they journey to places where not only aliens are chained, but humans as well.

Now I haven’t read the first book but I was surprised when I started reading that I didn’t really need the first one in order to understand what was going on. Stopmout’s wife has been in hiding an...more
Gretchen
Not as good as The Inferior. Plot was not original and the ending was obvious pretty early in the book. Still a decent read.
Tina (yAdultReview)
Originally published at Nose in a Book

Oh, the cannibalism! The word "flesh" will forever invoke disgust in me, I'm afraid. A line from chapter two goes like this: "Sweet, milky flesh that tasted so much better raw" (p. 27). Oh god, ew. I'm a vegetarian, so maybe I'm even more sensitive than your average omnivore, but I felt so sick after reading that! Raw and milky are not the right descriptors if you're trying to entice me, just saying. At one point, the phrase "tasty gore" is used and I litera...more
Christina (A Reader of Fictions)
I didn't particularly like The Inferior; although it was well done, I just had trouble relating to or getting into something so wildly different. My experience with The Deserter was better, probably largely due to the fact that I knew what to expect. Now, when I say better, I don't mean that I loved it or even really liked it, but I did enjoy the experience more.

Ó Guilín deserves some serious praise, and I would like to start with that. Although I have not gotten into this series, his worldbuild...more
Lisa Miller Chandler
THIS paper back & book 1 will be given away from me
As part of my Blog GIVEAWAY / blog hop


Description of book #2 / THE DESERTER. (Book 1 will
Also be given away to the same winner)

The humans are weak and vulnerable. Soon the beasts that share their stone-age world will kill and eat them. To save his tribe, Stopmouth must make his way to the Roof, the mysterious hi-tech world above the surface.

But the Roof has its own problems. The nano technology that controls everything from the environment t...more
William
"The Inferior", the first book in the series, was an entertaining book with an original and memorable premise. The sequel soon leaves behind the setting of the first book with its cannibal tribesmen and variety of carnivorous aliens as the protagonist Stopmouth travels to the highly-advanced society of The Roof - a once-utopian civilisation now becoming increasingly dystopian. Although this is a more traditional SF setting, the book continues to feel original perhaps due to the contrast between...more
Kale
Stopmouth is on a quest to find Indrani and save his people. To do so he'll have to journey from the stark desolate primitive landscapes of the Surface and enter the overly saturated stimulation of the Roof. But nothing in either world goes unnoticed by the Commission. They're tracking Stopmouth and hunting Indrani amidst mounting tensions over the decaying state of living conditions. Together they'll find the key that holds the fate of the Roof's rulers in their hands. The Commission will stop...more
Bishop
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Marybeth (Manhattan Reader)
This is the second book that I have read that is the second in the series. I should really pay attention to what I request before I request it, but either way this book did in some ways make sense.

I'm not going to lie, I highly recommend reading the first book, which I wish I did. But after a while the reader can keep up with who is who and the main drama surrounding the novel, which I think worked well for Guilin. Even if someone doesn't read the first book, they at least won't be completely lo...more
uroš
Fans of the old-school sf writers (well Peadar admitted to being a fan of some anyways and it shows here) rejoice - The Deserter is no less than a certified homage to old school space opera. I enjoy the fact that the first book was fantasy through-and-through and the second one is a pure space adventure. Since I haven't read so much of the old stuff I can't comment how many ideas he's borrowed, but I really enjoyed the concept of the Roof (as a concept and as a living environment), nano-tech, Cr...more
Karin
I was immediately drawn to this story when I read the synopsis, but it took me sitting down with it in my hands to figure out why. THE DESERTER is the sequel to THE INFERIOR, which I reviewed on the blog in 2009. Apparently the series is called The Bone World Trilogy. Unfortunately, it is necessary for you to read THE INFERIOR before this one in order to understand what is going on in the story. There is hardly any backstory explained. This jumps right in where the last one left off (just a few...more
Pam
I received this book from NetGalley for an honest review. Creatures are slowly wiping out what is left of mankind on the surface. The Roof may be their only hope for survival so Stopmouth decides to go there to find answers and his missing wife Indrani. When he gets there he soon finds out that he and what is left of mankind are the people of The Roof's entertainment. Those people spend all day watching their actions on the surface. The people of The Roof have their own problems as the nanos tha...more
Katrina Patton
I got this book as part of Goodreads First Reads so thank you for the free book!

When I registered to get the book, I hadn't known it was a sequel and I considered reading this without reading the first one but I'm glad I didn't do that. I don't think this one would have made any sense on its own.

The writing style still leaves a lot to the imagination at times and some readers might find this lack of clear description frustrating. As in the first book, it was hard to really picture what things...more
Autumn
May 04, 2012 Autumn added it
This book is a sequel to the book, The Inferior. I, however, did not become aware of this fact until about 200 pages in, when I looked up at my friend Sam and said, "You know, you really have to hit the ground running with this book. In fact, it reads just exactly like it's the sequel of a whole other book." Then I got this kind of prickling feeling in my stomach, and muttered, "Please, god, no." A quick web search confirmed that this was the case. You know, fantasy/sci-fi novels should be clear...more
Keith
Stopmouth is a great example of a character, ripped from his home and comfort zone and thrown into a situation totally foreign and forced to survive day to day with little to no knowledge of how to accomplish this impossible feat. I find this theme to be very enjoyable and Ó Guilín does an excellent job keeping the tension high throughout the story and continuously finding new ways to turn Stopmouth's world upside down. I wasn't immediately pleased to see the narration split between Stopmouth an...more
Susan
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Elizabeth B
I had no idea this was a sequel and felt completely lost. Unlike many sequels that can stand alone, this one clearly cannot. There was nothing to indicate this was a sequel and only learned that fact by coming to goodreads. Poor, poor marketing in that regard: the followers of the series may not find it and those who stumble on it will be irritated (or completely lost as I was). I floundered for the first quarter of the book before finally just giving up. Perhaps after I’ve had a chance to read...more
Tara Hall
Oct 07, 2011 Tara Hall rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Teens, boys
A delightful sequel to The Inferior! Stopmouth continues to be endearing and admirable as he makes his way through the different, but equally savage, land of the Roof.

The themes of racism, overcoming adversity, and true justice are carried through beautifully. It crosses genres without missing a beat, one part fantasy, one part scifi, one part dystopian. It is in every way a worthy successor to the first book.
Jer Hogan
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Sophie
A bit confusing, a lot of terminology unexplained which left you guessing. There were some characters never fully introduced i.e. wallbreaker, with gaps in the characters, that were introduced fully, history. Very vivd and strong characters dispite the gaps and a very exciting and unpredictable plot. This is the second in the series, I skipped the first as I didn't know it existed
Anna
Reading this almost makes me want to be a vegetarian. Almost.

I am a fan of science fiction and fantasy, but this was unique, in a good way. It's very original. And in YA that can be hard to find. The one thing I did not like was that you could not tell it was a sequel. It should say on the book that it's book two in The Bone World Trilogy.
But over all I enjoyed it.
Mickey
A creative combination of Sharp North and The Matrix, this book works well as a stand-alone novel even though it is a sequal. The characters are shockingy authentic and the world is well-developed and complete. I would recommend this story to high school and college students who enjoy sci-fi or dystopic novels. It is a much faster read than its length suggests.

Vikki
I thoroughly enjoyed this sequel, but I have to admit that I preferred the first book. I thought The Deserter was very well-written, like The Inferior, and the plot was fast-paced and exciting. Maybe it was a bit too science fiction-y for me, but that's a personal thing and nevertheless I still really liked this book. Looking forward to the next one!
Heather
I really liked the start of the book, but by the time Stopmouth finally caught up to Indrani, I had lost interest in the story and the characters. It was okay, but really not great. Sometimes the cannibalism bits get overly gross, too. Only read this one if you have previously read The Inferior, or you will be thoroughly confused.
Guy Haley
A brilliant follow-up to The Inferior, O Guilin shows us again that young adult fiction doesn't have to be introspective, egocentric adolescent nonsense, and that young adults themselves don't have to conform to the same stereotype.
Blaize
This is a really hard book to get into. The whole cannibal thing kind of freaks me out. What's so weird about this book is that the culture(s) portrayed are just so foreign that it takes awhile to get used to.
Alytha
Good follow-up to the first volume, although I felt that there was an unnecessary amount of padding in terms of the characters being chased for chapters and chapters without very much happening.
Michael Humphrey
Decent book, but a bit otherworldly, enough so that it was hard to get into and feel comfortable navigating. By the middle of the book tho I was well-ensconsed in the Roof and burning up some pages.
Christina Thomas
Christina Thomas marked it as to-read
Oct 19, 2014
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 23 24 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Assault (Recon Team Angel, #1)
  • The Prince Who Fell from the Sky
  • Daughter of the Centaurs (Centauriad, #1)
  • Deviant
  • Losers in Space
  • Paradise
  • The Rule of Claw (The Rule of Claw, #1)
  • Empire of Ruins (The Hunchback Assignments, #3)
  • The Boy at the End of the World
  • Yesterday
  • Living Hell
  • The Secret of Ka
  • Alien Invasion and Other Inconveniences
  • Aurora (Exodus, #3)
  • The Third
  • Crimson Rising (Skyship Academy #2)
  • Bronze Summer (Northland, #2)
  • Passenger (The Marbury Lens, #2)
The Inferior (The Bone World Trilogy, #1) The Volunteer Forever in the Memory of God: And Other Stories The Volunteer (The Bone World Trilogy) (Volume 3) Forever in the Memory of God And Other Stories

Share This Book

No trivia or quizzes yet. Add some now »

“There were the talking squiggles he'd seen in the crashed Globe too - writing, it was called - and it covered every surface, as if in this mass of people a man could be so lonely as to want to speak to the buildings.” 4 likes
“Stupid men, always thinking they're the ones who get to do the rescuing.” 3 likes
More quotes…