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The King's Commission (Alan Lewrie, #3)
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The King's Commission (Alan Lewrie #3)

4.1 of 5 stars 4.10  ·  rating details  ·  651 ratings  ·  15 reviews
Dewey Lambdin has created one of the greatest characters in historical adventure fiction. Naval officer and rogue, Alan Lewrie is a man of his times and a hero for all times. His equals are Hornblower, Aubrey, and Maturin—sailors beloved by readers all over the world.

In The King's Commission, Midshipman Alan Lewrie passes the examination for Lieutenancy and finds himself c
ebook, 367 pages
Published January 31st 1996 by St. Martin's Griffin (first published 1991)
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Don Casto
This was the third of a series of Mr. Lamblin's books about sailing ships and life in the late 1700s. It stood up to the most stringent test I have . . .maintaining my interest after picking it up and putting down for over a month.
Not an good as Bolitho or Hornblower--and the F-bombing doesn't make it any better.
This is the third of Dewey Lambdin's series on the career of Alan Lewrie. The timing of this novel is the last couple of years of the American Revolution, after the defeat of Cornwallis and before the peace treaty is signed between the new U.S. and Britain. Lewrie is serving in the Caribbean where the Royal Navy continues to battle the French and the Spanish navies, which had allied themselves with the colonies. Lewrie distinguishes himself and passes the test for lieutenancy, thereby becoming a ...more
It seems, judging from hints in this third volume, that Lewrie has managed to clear himself of the charges maliciously leveled by his erstwhile father, and gained a bit of glory for himself in the process. Lt. Kenyon returns to haunt him briefly, but Alan parries Kenyon’s attempts to get Alan into deep water by reminding Kenyon of his (Kenyon’s) own sordid past with sodomistic pleasures, and this prevents Kenyon from sabotaging Alan’s successful promotion to a commission: his lieutenancy. He is ...more
I have read all 17 installments of the Alan Lewrie adventures and am now going back and re-reading some of my favorites. The King's Commission is one of those books. There's plenty of sea-action, a little romance, and lot of detail about sailing in an 18th century ship of war. Lambdin's historical fiction is also informational and he does a good job blending the fictional story into some of the actual events. If you enjoy maritime historical fiction, these are great books to read.

The King's Comm
Solid fun read. My only issue was I think he focused a little too much on sex at times. I am not trying to read a bodice ripper here, I want a naval adventure. However, once he gets Alan away from society and out to sea it is a very entertaining read.
Another great book in the naval adventures of Alan Lewrie series. They just keep getting better!
Jason Braida
Lambdin, Dewey. The King's Commission.

I didn't enjoy this book as much as I enjoyed the previous two books in the Alan Lewrie series. Too much time spent ashore for my tastes and too many pages committed to Alan Lewrie's complicated affairs of the heart. That being said, I will in due time buy the fourth book in this series.
David Morgan
My favorite book out of the Alan Lewrie series so far.
Aspen Junge
I read the entire series largely back-to-back (my local public library is well-stocked). One of the great things about this series is that we get to watch Alan Lewrie, the main character, grow up from a callow, self-indulgent teenager to a mature, thoughtful, and responsible adult.
Thomas T
I very much enjoyed this book, I look forward to following Alan Lewerie on his further adventures, I would recommend this series to anyone who likes the Bernard Cornwell "Sharpe series" or other Naval adventures such as Hornblower,
Mike (the Paladin)
Lots of battles, lots of gore...lots of sex. Alan hasn't changed a lot in some ways but in others he's learning. For on thing the navy may not have been such a big mistake afterall.
Allen remains bawdy, funny, ingenious, and lucky. And the scene at the end with the cat and the new captain made me laugh so hard!
Keith Gerlach
Enjoying the heck out of this naval series. Alan Lewrie is my kind of swashbuckler!
RS Fuster
It just get better and better with each subsequent story (book)
Seth Bobbink
Seth Bobbink marked it as to-read
Nov 18, 2015
RJ_Pruett marked it as to-read
Nov 03, 2015
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Dewey Lambdin (1945- ) is an American nautical historical novelist. He is best known for his Alan Lewrie naval adventure series, set during the Napoleonic Wars. Besides the Alan Lewrie series, he is also the author of What Lies Buried: a novel of Old Cape Fear.

A self-proclaimed "Navy Brat," Lambdin spent a good deal of his early days on both coasts of the U.S.A., and overseas duty stations, with h
More about Dewey Lambdin...

Other Books in the Series

Alan Lewrie (1 - 10 of 21 books)
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