Malgudi Days
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Malgudi Days

4.17 of 5 stars 4.17  ·  rating details  ·  7,388 ratings  ·  242 reviews
A collection of 32 stories in which the author portrays an astrologer, a snake-charmer, a postman, a vendor of pies and chappatis - all kinds of people, drawn in full colour and domestic detail. The imaginary city of Malgudi springs to life, revealing the essence of India and of human experience.
Paperback, 256 pages
Published January 1st 1995 by Penguin Classics (first published 1942)
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(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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James
Malgudi Days, written by R.K Narayan, chronicles the lives of people in the fictional town of Malgudi. The stories, which share the lives of everyone from entrepreneurs to beggars, all take place in and near this Indian village. Thus the heart and the soul of that village is on display and we find it is a place where most people are haunted by illiteracy and unemployment. Yet despite the ubiquity of the poor many of the stories come across with humorous good-natured episodes of their lives. Amon...more
Prashant
No bookshelf is complete without malgudi days.
Ashima
I had really high expectations when I picked this up and, of course, I was initially disappointed. I eventually started to enjoy these short (4-6 page) stories because each has fully developed characters experiencing mini-dramas. All the stories take place in the same town and a few of the characters pop up in multiple stories. I ended up liking this and appreciating it for what it is - a thoughtful, sweet, well written collection of short stories. I was telling my mom about it and she said that...more
Joy H.
Added 4/11/12.
Below is from a post I wrote in my GR group 4/11/12:

Just by chance I've stumbled on a good thing. Someone somewhere mentioned Malgudi Days (first published 1942) by R.K. Narayan. It's a book of engaging short stories set in India, "revealing the essence of India", as the GR description says.

I didn't think I'd be interested in reading it at first. So I did the next best thing... ordered the movie adaptation from Netflix.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244911/
http://movies.netflix.com/S...more
Bipasha{is eviscerated by fiction}
If I regard all the timeless classics I have been fortunate enough to be a part of, the one series that sticks out like a gentle reminder of life itself is the late Sh.R K Narayan's 'Malgudi Days'
The two names that have become synonymous to me with being simple yet powerful. The two souls that have given me so many memorable moments on print and celluloid. I am still fascinated at the ease with which these men managed to craft the rhythm of the life in the stories of Malgudi.

Narayan's creation...more
Bharathi
Jan 28, 2008 Bharathi rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Bharathi by: Gerry Nelson
I loved this collection of short stories - RK Narayan ranks there with Chekov . The stories captured the essence of India and spirit of her people. Having studied and travelled there , I felt nostalgic reading about the lives of the households and street denizens of the fictional yet not-so-fictional town of Malgudi. Narayan's prose also steers away from pain, suffering and verbosity that sometimes dominates many Indian works. He paints it as simple and resilient

Gerry picked this one for our Bo...more
Nagesh
In my view, this one book shows what a versatile author and story teller R K Narayan was.

Though by the time I bought this book, the Malgudi Days teleserial was completed and RKN was already etched in every youngsters mind.

However this book of short stories, left an even deeper impact on my mind.

Especially two stories I can never forget.

Eshwar & Bulldozer.

While Eshwar depicted the tragic side of the common man, Bulldozer showed the hilarious aspect. Infact it was too good not to burst out int...more
Meera
Such a lovely reread; Narayan doesn't age, doesn't fade. Images from some of these stories will stay with me for a long time, I'm sure—the lonely sign painter licking cotton candy from the corners of his lips, the gambler who breaks open his son's coin box with a pestle, the knife-sharpener yelling in the streets, the cobbler who thinks he might have met god in the shape of a hippie...life is hard, life is sweet, life is sour, life is bitter, life is long.
Yael  Feinerman
Super short short stories, ranging from 3-10 pages per. Amazingly - I didn't hit upon one that left me dangling, or feeling incomplete, as some short stories do. Narayan's writing is ---spicy is the word that comes to mind, like eating hot chilli peppers that wake up every taste bud in your mouth and leave you grabbing for more. Couldn't put this one, I found it electrifying.
Parikhit
A collection of short stories from the bustling town of Malgudi, 'Malgudi Days' is a conglomeration of humour, satire, simplicity and perfection. A literary sorcerer, Narayan breathes in life into his impeccable stories. Indeed preserved for posterity.
The varied collection of short stories is embellished with Narayan’s signature humour and the natural serene setting makes the stories all the more captivating. While some left me laughing out loud other doused me in gloom. 'An Astrologer’s Day',...more
Zen
What can I say about Malgudi Days? Malgudi is a fictional Indian town created by R.K. Narayan, conceived in such realistic detail that the University of Chicago Press once mistakenly put it in their atlas. But can you blame them? Most of Narayan's works take place in Malgudi, and the more you read about the place, the more you start to feel like it exists — that you might like to visit it someday, too.

"Whom next shall I meet in Malgudi? That is the thought that comes to me when I close a novel o
...more
El
You won't find Malgudi on any real map, but Narayan describes the people and the location with such skill that I often forgot that I was not being transported to an authentic Indian city.

In Narayan's introduction he explains that in India "the writer has only to look out of the window to pick up a character and thereby a story." He accomplishes this thought exceptionally well and introduces a variety of different characters, from a wayward student to an astrologer. The majority of the early stor...more
Aristotle
Nov 11, 2013 Aristotle rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone interested about India
This was 'The Book' I knew and read again and all over again during my childhood, and so was the case with the same author's 'Swami & Friends'. R.K. Narayan captures thew very heart of the Indian, and unlike the books that come nowadays wrapped in the fake version of India, this is a book with a living, beating Indian heart. There isn't another like this book.
Josh
The introduction was not my favorite writing by Lahiri.

The rest very occasionally reminded me of India, and not in an expected way: I was drawn in and hopelessly bored at the same time, couldn't wait to get back into it so it would finally be over.

A couple of good stories- worth reading for sure.
Avneet Singh
I loved this collection of short stories from RK Narayan. A much needed after "A world of Nagaraj". Glad that I didnt decide to leave Narayan without reading this masterpiece. This has encouraged me to read more of Narayan.
Elizabeth
More short stories I really liked. A theme of irony was pretty thick- and though fun at first, it got old after awhile. It was cool to read something set in India and learn more about their country and culture.
Deepa Swaminathan
The stories listed here are my favourites in the order of preference.

1. Engine trouble (Lucky enough to win a road roller): This, according to me, is the best of the lot! Here the protagonist wins a road roller as a prize in some fair! The same minute start his troubles when he has to transport the huge vehicle to his home. He has to then pay rent to park the vehicle on a field. He manages to employ a driver, a temple elephant and 50 coolies for transporting it in the midst of an amused crowd of...more
Rishi Prakash
This book is a collection of 32 stories by the master story teller so a complete treat as you can imagine  All stories are completely different in terms of the content but a common thread binds them together which is ordinary life of ordinary people like us.

It is this same book which led to the famous series on Doordarshan “Malgudi Days” which was as popular in kids as in adults; I can never forget Swami and all his innocent mistakes apart from the title track of that show!

Each story is uniqu...more
Sachin
Well, its all about the fictional town of Malgudi, given birth by the Imagination and sheer brilliance of R.K.Narayan, who always wanted to be with his people. His main stress was on character delineation, he himself said that, "once character comes up, every thing revolves around it".
So, here too Narayan has given an insight into the psyche of the common men and women, the inhabitants of Malgudi, their idiosyncracies, their routine, their behaviour at specific instants, their innocence, simplic...more
Sastha Prakash
This is a part of my exercise to read all RK Narayan's books. The edition I read is without the intro of Jhumpa Lahiri.

These are wonderful short stories from the fictional town called Malgudi. This small town can be any small town between Independence and late 1970s. He takes up the regular characters and develops a story around them. I am astounded by his powers of observation. He can just conjure up a story involving a mendicant and a cobbler, and their brief interaction.

Wonderful read. Hats o...more
Chitrangi Kakoti
These short stories captures the very essence of rural India during the late colonial era, which represents even the contemporary rural India. Although the village of Malgudi and its residents are fictional, yet they are real at the same time- their fears, their dreams and hopes, their way of living, their traditions and culture. The appeal of 'Malgudi Days' lies as much as in its simplicity as in its endearing characters. R.K. Narayan created a truly magical world. A must-read.
Mrinal
Though from an Indian writer, this book stands out. There are short stories which revolve around a village called Malgudi. The characters are well defined. Most of the endings are so human that it makes you feel that, "really? we all do this?". Book is kind of collection as it was published in 1943. I will say, todays amateur and useless spicy writers like Bhagat, Durjoy, Ravindar and Ahuja should read it as Standard for PhD to know how to write a book so basic but so great.
Debayan Nag
Indian-hood

The Indian community, with its pros and cons, the distinctive classes bearing their retrospective over the top nature, lamentations, smirks, joys, miseries, melancholy, quick wit - thus an all gathering portrayal could not be better presented without a reference to an absolutely new, non-existing fictional place, a small town like any existing whose day to day events are but an admiring epigraph, a representative of our reality itself.
"Malgudi" serves as the storehouse of the India...more
Haritha
What a wonderful collection of stories! Reading Malgudi Days makes me feel like I've been dropped through time a few decades into the innocent past where the people were as simple and unassuming as the style in which Narayan writes. There is no one like R.K. Narayan who can arouse the same feelings of poignant nostalgia. Adding to the whole blast from the past feel, there were many stories that I was already familiar with from my school times. Simply enchanting!
Akshay
"Malgudi Days" by R.K. Narayan is a delightful collection of 32 short funny and witty stories. Rather than revolving around a particular plot, the stories go on multiple tangents. Each of them describing mundane issues such as the relationship between family members, social taboos etc. Malgudi days is a collection of 32 short funny and witty stories. All the stories will seem faintly similar but they are vastly different from each other. The stories deal with the most ordinary men and women and...more
Ameay kumar
Its really outstanding how Rk Narayan can tell a story that is so simple and still make leave a ever lasting impression. I think till I am alive I will not forget " maneater of Malgudi". It was equally interesting to watch Malgudi days directed by Shankar Nag it was shot in Agumbe which is 300 KM from Bangalore a small town that is so beautiful. You can actually here the music when you walk through the town and it really mesmerizing.
Bhanu
I thought it was an OK read. It is because I read the book much later than the TV series. I could not find anything new as most stories were remade in TV.

It is a must read for those who haven't watched Malgudi Days on TV. Malgudi Days captured the rustic India like no other TV serial. Much has to do with the way it was written. Malgudi is a world within itself. What wonderful days they were in childhood!
Amy

It's one thing to create a book, a character, a family, a life-way. It's another thing altogether to build the community of Malgudi and write stories so the reader truly knows Malgudi, has lived there, argued there, fought there, felt like a resident. Narayan doesn't just build a world with his tiny, breathmint stories. Narayan invites you to reside in that world.
Mukunth
It is quintessentially Indian village and childhood in rural village. Swami's school days are similar to that of any other child irrespective of place be it city or rural, the settings may differ but the thinking, plays, fears, mischief are the same. The book is original to every word and suffuse one with dejavu!! Prepared for tickles and laugh out loud!!
Jaise Joseph
It is a collection of shot stories. There is no continuation at all. It is not a kind I expected and some of the stories are too kiddish. Some stories by the end are really good. The first few stories posse some fantastic meaning but later in the middle pages some few stories lack a proper story thread..
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1305302
R. K. Narayan is among the best known and most widely read Indian novelists writing in English.

R.K. Narayan was born in Madras, South India, in 1906, and educated there and at Maharaja's College in Mysore. His first novel, Swami and Friends and its successor, The Bachelor of Arts, are both set in the enchanting fictional territory of Malgudi and are only two out of the twelve novels he based there...more
More about R.K. Narayan...
Swami and Friends The Guide The Ramayana: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic The English Teacher The Man-Eater of Malgudi

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