And Tango Makes Three
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And Tango Makes Three

4.32 of 5 stars 4.32  ·  rating details  ·  4,041 ratings  ·  741 reviews
In the zoo there are all kinds of animal families. But Tango's family is not like any of the others. This illustrated children's book fictionalizes the true story of two male penguins who became partners and raised a penguin chick in the Central Park Zoo.
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published June 1st 2005 by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (first published April 26th 2005)
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(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Marika Gillis
This true story about two penguins who live in the Central Park Zoo has been creating quite a controversy. I heard about the book this morning on The View (yes, I do inevitably end up watching four women squabbling on tv when I don't have to work, and controversies like this are the reason I keep going back!). After hearing about it, I just had to check out the book for myself at Barnes and Noble.

This children's book tells the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins. Like all other ch...more
Lisa Vegan
Jun 26, 2008 Lisa Vegan rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: absolutely everyone, especially kids 4-8 with same sex parents, but all kids & adults
Good grief Charlie Brown! What is all the fuss about this book, anyway?!?!!

This is a very sweet story. It’s the true tale about 2 male penguins who are a pair and how they came to tend an egg and then raise Tango, a baby penguin. This happens at the Central Park Zoo in New York City, and the illustrations really show off Central Park and the zoo; they’re beautiful and the expressions on the penguins’ faces are priceless.

This is a picture book for 4-8 year olds and it’s a wonderful story for kids...more
Marie
This is apparently the #1 banned book in the country! My husband sought it out at the library, and it has a big red tag on the cover that says "BANNED!" I love the fact that it is a true story!
Eastofoz
Jun 26, 2010 Eastofoz rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Readers who want to introduce same sex couples in literature to their children
Recommended to Eastofoz by: Children's group
Shelves: children-3-to-6
What a very cute story this turned out to be. Two male penguins end up hatching an egg that was given to them by the zoo keeper and they raise a baby penguin to become part of their happy family. The controversy surrounding this book seems excessive in my opinion. Sure it has two male penguins and not a male and a female (where's the "tragedy" there?) but the focus is the love that they have for each other so much so that they want to start a family and share that love with a baby.

This is the f...more
Kimberlyn
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Kathryn
Review Updated*SEE COMMENTS*

Encouraged by my friend Chandra's positive review, I decided to finally give this book a try. It's popularity and controversy made me tentative before--not due to the subject, but because I thought it might have been a platform book meant to push an agenda, rather than simply tell a good story. Upon reading, I have come to the decision that it is both.

This is the very sweet true story of two penguins from the Central Park Zoo who happen to be male, happen to adore one...more
Cathy
A perfect book. The paintings are beautiful, totally the kind I'd have poured over as a kid over and over again to catch all of the details of the lovely animals. The faces and body language for the penguins are so expressive, they would tell the story even without words. And the story is so touching and lovely, it actually got me all teared up. I know what it's like to want a baby and not be able to have one. It's such a sweet and wonderful story to see these two little guys get the family they...more
Miss Lynx Canadensis
This is my 4-year-old son's very favourite book, which he has insisted on me reading to him almost every night before he goes to sleep ever since I bought it for him two years ago or so. There are other kids' books I like better myself, but this one is really sweet, and he loves it beyond all measure. He even named his stuffed toy penguin Tango (he had the toy before we got the book, but as soon as he heard the book read for the very first time, he decided the penguin was now Tango, and thus it...more
Krista
As fond followers of ALA’s “Banned Book Week” would admit, when a title such as this one is added to the infamous list, it only makes circulation numbers on the title go up as well as critical discussion on the values of the work. The fact that the plot is based on a true story adds so much narrative power and reliability, and makes Richardson’s work one of the most excellent and relevant sources out of the fairly lackluster and minimal collection on this topic to date. Richardson is an assistan...more
Ronyell
“And Tango Makes Three” is an Aspca Henry Bergh Book award winning book about how two male penguins, Roy and Silo, try to have a child together. Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell along with illustrations by Henry Cole makes “And Tango Makes Three” a truly touching story about what it takes to make a true family.

Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell have done a great job at discussing one of the major issues in our society in a lighthearted and comforting way. Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell...more
Cebon
We recently stumbled upon this book at the library without realizing what it was; I ("Mommy") noticed the cover, and loved the illustration. Moments later our two year old son chose another copy from the same shelf, and handed it to me. Later that evening, I was surprised and quite taken with the story upon discovering that (SPOILER) Tango does in fact have two daddies! Apparently we've been living under a rock, because I literally completely forgot that this is what this story is about.

And Tang...more
Sheila
I read this to my 7 month old niece tonight. I only cried at the last page. :)
Anna  Matsuyama
This book tells a true story about two male penguins ,Roy and Silo, who were given an egg and they hatched & raised a baby girl penguin Tango.

I read this to Kaito who liked the story & pictures. He thought it's silly that the pair tried to hatch a rock when they could steal an egg. He was pleased when zookeeper gave to the couple the egg to hatch.

After finishing the story, we had nice chat about family and that if you really wish for something it's not impossible.

Krista the Krazy Kataloguer
Cute story about 2 male penguins who hatch an egg and become parents at the zoo in Central Park. Apparently this actually happened at the zoo. There was a book that came out a while back about homosexuality in nature--Biological Exuberance: Animal Homosexuality and Natural Diversity by Bruce Bagemihl. This incident at the zoo would seem to bear out the author's observations. Most interesting.
Kelly Maybedog
Note to detractors: THIS IS A TRUE STORY! The art is simple but sweet and fairly colorful considering the pictures are of penguins in their barren habitat. The story is beautifully told, with a minimum of anthropomorphizing. It's just one of those feel good books that you just have to read. I recommend it for everyone who can handle the idea that two male penguins can fall in love.
Tatiana
Families come in all different arrangements, and that goes for penguin families, too. I know there's a lot of fuss about this book, but I don't see anything wrong with telling a sweet story about love and dedication.

Based on a true story, the Chinstrap penguins Roy and Silo at the Central Park Zoo are both boys, but they love each other and do everything like the other penguin couples. Except that they can't produce an egg to sit on. So the zookeeper gives them an extra egg to take care of, and...more
Mary
And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, illustrated by Henry Cole, Simon (Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing) 2005.

K-3 At New York City's Central Park Zoo, two male penguins fall in love and start a family by taking turns sitting on an abandoned egg until it hatches. –Summary from WorldCat

I LOVE this story for many reasons. First off, as one librarian told me, “penguins are the new dinosaurs.” Meaning, kids love penguins now, like many of them used to love dinosaur...more
Alice
I have wanted to read this book to see what all the hype is about...and hype it all is.

In an of itself the story is true interesting and the pictures are good. If you want to know what I think about the content read below. As a librarian, I ordered this book because I don't believe in censorship. I believe in having materials available that families might need. I believe it shouldn'tbe locked away or on a high shelf or behind the desk. If people need to talk about this subject, it will be on ou...more
N_stefanie Akwa
If you only buy one new book to add to your classroom library, this is the one I would recommend! I couldn’t be happier to find a book that honestly and innocently portrays an “alternative” family structure that can provide some scaffolding for future interactions with children of same-sex parents. From my perspective, it is perfect. Even the illustrations are wonderfully playful, accurate, and fill the pages!

“In the zoo there are all kinds of animal families. But Tango’s family is not like any...more
Linda
Although this is a controversial book, it is wonderfully writen. This is a true story of two boy penguins fall in love and adopt an egg to care for and raise as their own. It illustrates how there are different kinds of families and how they all share the same kind of love. Kids will enjoy the story and love the penguins and this will open up their minds and invite discussions on different kinds of families. Pre-k through 2nd.

From SLJ:
"This tale based on a true story about a charming penguin fam...more
Jennifer
There are all sorts of families in Central Park Zoo in New York. There are red panda families, monkey families, toad families, toucan families, and cotton-top tamarin families. And in the penguin house there are penguin families too. One of these families is a little different from the others. Roy and Silo do everything the other penguin couples do – they bow together, walk together, sing together and swim together. They even build a nest together, just like all the other penguin couples. But wh...more
Megan
I understand why people might take offense to this book, but from my own view point, I find this book delightful. It is a great conversation starter to talk to children about a delicate topic such as homosexuality. We have to face the fact that there are men and women in our culture and cultures all over the world that are homosexual. Does that mean we treat them any differently? Of course not. I love my gay friends just as much as my heterosexual friends. Yes in our society, people view homosex...more
Peacegal
It’s penguins! Gay penguins! How could anybody hate penguins? Well, it would seem that many people do, as And Tango Makes Three is one of the most challenged and banned recent books to waddle its way onto bookshelves.

The outcry probably wasn’t a surprise to the authors. They knew they were wading into touchy territory when they decided to create a picture book out of the true story of two male penguins at New York’s Central Park Zoo who paired off as mates, built a nest, and eventually raised a...more
Kelly
Lighthearted and not even remotely heavy-handed, this book is a great addition to any collection of books trying to show the many possible compositions of a loving family. (In case you somehow missed the hysteria, And Tango Makes Three is the true story of two male penguins in the Central Park Zoo who enthusiastically adopt an egg in need of a loving family.)

Reading through other reviews, one seemed to summarize (for me) what makes lots of folks nervous about this book. The reviewer said, "I t...more
Joanie
Seeing as this is one of the most frequently banned or challenged books out there I just had to read it. My library had it on the parenting shelf in the children's room (along with storybooks about divorce, death, new babies etc) which I guess is an appropriate spot but it also made me wonder if this was done because of all the negative attention the book has received. In all fairness, there are two shelves of "special interest" storybooks in the parenting section so this book was in no way bani...more
Sarah Sammis
And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell has been the top on the list of the most challenged books in the United States in 2006, 2007 and 2008. When I saw it at my public library (yay!) I snatched it up to take home and read to my kids.

The book is based on facts. In 2000 Roy and Silo were given an egg from a two egg clutch knowing that the original parents had never successfully reared two eggs. Roy and Silo had been sitting on an egg shaped rock so the egg was given to them...more
*Queen Diva*
I just sat down in the library one day and read this book and cried at the end.

This is such a touching little story! I cannot believe some libraries have banned it simply because the family is made up of two male penguins.

I would like to thank Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell, and Henry Cole for this fantastic book! It was well written and contained a very touching story. I think, as an ally of the LGBTQIA community, this book gives me a little hope for something. The way the authors and illust...more
JG (The Introverted Reader)
In this true story, Roy and Silo are two male chinstrap penguins in the Central Park Zoo who don't quite fit in. They don't take any notice of the female penguins and instead form their own little family.

What an adorable little book! The illustrations by Henry Cole are charming. The story of Roy and Silo is sensitively written for the young ones. I was sad as they tried to nest and then uplifted when little Tango came along. All in the space of 30 or so pages. And I just love that the story is c...more
538pm_Stephanie Scherer
After picking up And Tango Makes Three just because I love penguins, I found that I stumbled upon an amazing non-fictional read. Roy and Silo are not your usual pairing of penguins because they are both boys. They do everything together, sing, swim, and even build a nest together. They do everything right, sit on the nest all day and night, but when all the other penguin couples' eggs hatch, Roy and Silo are still just two. With the help of a caring zoo keeper who recognizes true love, readers w...more
Susan
I heard about this book from one of my good friends after discussing socially just children's literature.

The story introduces us to a pair of boy penguins, Rob & Silo, who do everything the boy & girl coupled penguins do. They are, in fact, in love! But when the time comes for them to lay an egg, they come across a bit of a problem. They say it takes two to tango, but in this case it took two to hatch Tango...and a caring zoo employee with a bright idea!

This book presents a lovely way to...more
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