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Feeding Friendsies

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3.54  ·  Rating Details  ·  63 Ratings  ·  24 Reviews
The children are busily, gleefully preparing a grand feast: puddle-water soup, mud pie, and a dandelion-and-dirt dessert. Yum! The young chefs are creating these tasty dishes for their special guests, who chirp, wiggle, and hop. Suzanne Bloom, author of the best-selling Goose and Bear books, including the award-winning A Splendid Friend, Indeed, has created a delightful ce ...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published September 1st 2011 by Boyds Mills Press
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 87)
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Lisa
Mar 03, 2012 Lisa rated it liked it
Shelves: ala, arc, picture-books
Cute story with cheerful illustrations. Each child makes something ("a lovely, crunchy lunch from stems and leaves with flowers on top", "a dirt dessert from roots and twigs and chunks and clumps and dandelions"), followed by the question "Will s/he eat it?" "Oh no, no, no. S/he made it for the butterflies/wiggly worms/etc." Then they wash up and mom serves a picnic lunch. "Will they eat it? Oh yes. Oh yes, yes, yes!" It's a nice repetitive story with a nice cadence. The illustrations aren't exa ...more
Danie P.
Sep 30, 2011 Danie P. rated it it was amazing
Many friends are making mud pies, rainwater soup and dandelion desserts. Will they eat them? NOOOOOOO. They will feed them to their animal friends. Very cute story that is good for helping children anticipate the story and assist in narration. Appropriate for toddler and preschool storytime.
Barbara
Sep 16, 2011 Barbara rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-book
The whole gang heads outside to fix lunch consisting of a salad made up of stems, leaves, and flowers, a mud pie with sprinkles of sand, and soup created from puddle water and pebbles. But the children who create these delicious concoctions aren't preparing them for themselves; instead, they're for the butterflies, chickadees, and frogs that live in the area. After all their hard work, they settle down to a yummy lunch prepared by Nana who takes care to offer foods that resemble the ones they ju ...more
The Library Lady
Update:This is adorable, but sank like a lead balloon at the 2 and up story hours. May be a better one on one book after all. It happens.Sigh....

Original Review:This is going to be perfect for a food themed story hour! Kids are going to love seeing the children here make a mudpie with birdseed "sprinkles" for the chickadeeds, rainwater "soup" for frogs, etc. Pictures are big and bright and clear and listeners will soon be chorusing "NO!" to each "Will he/she eat it?" Think I am going to be buyin
...more
Naomi
May 19, 2015 Naomi rated it liked it
I can see the "mission" behind the book. Great way to have kids guess who would eat the foods, but it just seemed off to me and somewhat irritating with the repetitiveness.
Jen
Oct 02, 2014 Jen rated it it was amazing
lots of interaction and repetition for the toddler set. Great imaginative play book.
Mary
Aug 24, 2013 Mary rated it really liked it
This is a short, simple story that is excellent for younger children who are still experimenting with the world around them. It provides ideas for them (and their parents!) of things they can do with their outdoor-made creations besides eating them. At the end of the story, the children all get a person-friendly snack from Nana, after which they all are ready for a nap.

It is an adorable story with watercolor pictures and a theme with which children can easily connect.
Ina
Jul 28, 2012 Ina rated it really liked it
With simple, rhythmic text and soft vibrant water color illustrations this book describes the efforts of a group of toddlers who "cook" in the garden creating food from mud, puddle water and crunchy vegetation. Creating "foods" for worms, bunnies and butterflies. With the repeated phrase "will they eat it?" "No, no, no!" my story time audience loved the creations and guessing who might actually eat each of them.
Nick
Nov 29, 2011 Nick rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-book
Cute, but I still don't understand the connection between chickadees and a mud pie. The others "foods" all made a little sense. The artwork was a tiny bit too cutesy for my personal tastes, but the story itself was clever, especially once the reader gets to the scene showing why the kids are so interested in preparing fun foods for the bugs, birds and stuffed animals. Their own lunch is an inspiring visual treat...
Mary
Dec 28, 2011 Mary rated it really liked it
An excellent book for storytime. Young children, maybe toddlers, are playing outside making things to eat out of dirt, sticks, and leaves. Will they eat them? Oh, no, no, no! Toddlers and preschoolers will enjoy saying that refrain with you throughout the book. At the end, mom makes them real food to eat. Will they eat it? You have to read the book to find out.
Brindi
May 18, 2012 Brindi rated it it was amazing
I could definitely use this book in a garden-themed story time for preschoolers. Although they might not know various types of flowers, the repetitiveness and light text balances it out, making the book a perfect fit for this age group. The book could also lead into a discussion about what/if the children have gardens or grow things. Really enjoyed this story.
Sandy Brehl
Best with very young, emphasizing word play, silly scenarios and logical answers, combined with other food books (Go,Go, Grapes by April Pulley Sayre), etc.
With preschool or kindergarten this could lay the groundwork for lessons on food chains, habitats, environment, etc.

Jeanette Johnson
Nov 23, 2011 Jeanette Johnson rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
Delightful illustrations show a group of friends making imaginary food out of things found in the yard but they end up being lunch for real creatures such as earthworms and butterflies. They end up presented with their own lunch as well.
Samantha
Oct 20, 2011 Samantha rated it really liked it
Cute book that calls on the reader to guess who the food is for and also showcases a simple refrain that the an audience would pick up on pretty quickly. Great illustrations that feature a diverse group of children.
Amanda Taylor
Oct 10, 2012 Amanda Taylor rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-book
This is just a fun book for a read aloud. It could possibly used to show creative writing but I think it is just a good imagination book.
Donalyn
While this book sends a nice message about caring for backyard animals, the text was flat.
Rachel
Oct 12, 2011 Rachel rated it really liked it
This will make a great interactive book for storytime. I forsee lots of laughs.
Susan
Oct 25, 2011 Susan rated it liked it
Shelves: picture-books, play
Cute story with kids playing, making food like mud pies outside.
Mary Lee
Oct 30, 2011 Mary Lee rated it it was ok
Shelves: ncbla11, picture-book
The pattern in the story will make it fun for wee ones. Weak ending.
Edward Sullivan
Oct 11, 2011 Edward Sullivan rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
Bright, colorful, and entertaining read aloud book.
ReadingWench
Nov 08, 2011 ReadingWench rated it really liked it
Adorable. Illustrations are soft and lovely.

AR 1.4
GraceAnne
Aug 23, 2011 GraceAnne rated it really liked it
Cute and adorable and luscious in the best possible ways.
Thia
food, animals, plants,friends
Kim
Kim marked it as to-read
Feb 07, 2016
Charlene Mitchell
Charlene Mitchell marked it as to-read
Jan 18, 2016
Eileen
Eileen rated it really liked it
Jan 17, 2016
Megan
Megan rated it really liked it
Dec 17, 2015
Maggie Kohout
Maggie Kohout rated it it was amazing
Nov 13, 2015
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