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Special Ops (Brotherhood Of War, #9)
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Special Ops (Brotherhood of War #9)

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4.19 of 5 stars 4.19  ·  rating details  ·  1,927 ratings  ·  36 reviews
In November 1964, Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara went to the Congo with two hundred men, intent on making it his first step in taking over Africa and South America.

He failed, thanks in large part to the efforts of an intrepid band of Green Berets. Licking his wounds, he retreated to Cuba to recruit more men and try the same thing in Bolivia.

He failed there, too.

In fact, h
...more
Audio, Abridged, 1 page
Published January 15th 2001 by Putnam Berkley Audio
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(showing 1-30 of 2,718)
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Scott Holstad
I gave this book a chance, I really did, but I found it so bloody boring that I just gave up after 130 pages (which is a lot more than I'd usually give most books!).

It's part of a series, apparently the last one, and in it US Special Forces serviceman Jack Portet has just finished helping Belgian paratroopers liberate his family from Stanleyville in the Congo and is being reunited with his fiance, Marjorie Bellmon. Why his family is in Stanleyville, I'm not sure if we're ever told. It's a big my
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Jerome
No-one expects war novels to be great literature but one does expect them to be written to a professional standard. Anyone who buys a war novel by a professional writer and 'recognised' author of these sorts of books, such as W.E.B. Griffin, does expect two qualities to feature in the text: the first is that the book is entertaining and the second is a certain level of competence when it comes to using words. Special Ops has neither--and the reading, and paying, public certainly deserve better.

I
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Bill
"Special Ops" could easily have been the eighth book of the series and "The Aviators" could have been skipped altogether. In fact, Special Ops picks up almost immediately where "The New Breed" left off. Jack Portet had just finished helping the Belgian paratroopers liberate his family from Stanleyville in the Congo and was being reunited with Marjorie Bellmon. However, just because one crisis in the Congo was averted it doesn't mean everything had settled down. In fact new international intrigue ...more
Joan
I've read all of this Griffin series, The Brotherhood of War. It follows a group of young lieutenants as they move up in the army ranks from just after WW II into the 60s. Someitmes there's a bit too much technical information for me, but the characters more than make up for it.
Angus Whittaker
Its a little sad to finish a series that you really love, and that's how it was with this book, the ninth and last book in the Brotherhood of War series.
What really carries this series on its shoulders -perhaps the single support that keeps the whole series from collapsing on itself - is WEB Griffin's likable, animated, realistic, and funny characters. The cast of characters changes and evolves from book to book, as he introduces new characters, kills off or forgets about others, only leaving a
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J.W. Thompson
This series keeps you on the edge of your seat. read it years ago
Meakin


Stayed with it 'till the end and it was worth it.
Bob Conner
I first fell in love with Griffin's series beginning with the Corps Series. Then along came Brotherhood of War.

Like The Corps, his characters are engaging and richly colorful. But, the Brotherhood of War, while still very dynamic, seems to focus a little less on the world of war and fighting and more on the culture of the US Army, especially the officer's corps. Reading this series, I was intrigued by the almost country-club like atmosphere Griffin sees in play among the US Army officers and th
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Tony
Novel set in the Congo. Well written war book.
Rmwittig
War Novel-during time of Cuban Revolution
Patrick
Fantastic Read.
Joey
This book has really caught my attention, and liking. I started reading the book because the title caught my attention. I am a big fan of the Military, and am even joining after High School. So far it is good, even though it is not keeping me at the edge of my seat. It has had only one conflict in it, and that was at the beginning of the book. I do believe that the major conflict is still coming for a couple of reasons. 1) It is a 700 some page book and I am only on page 170. And 2) The beginnin ...more
Will
Special Ops Campaign Against Che Guevara. Congolese Simbas fueled by Olenga terrorize post-colonial Congo by killing whites, especially in Stanleyville where things get brutal until the Belgians launch a US-aided para-assault to root out the Simbas, and Jack Portet shifts from advisor to participant to rescue his mother and others holed up there. The US launches a clandestine assistance program for the fledgling Congolese government after the Soviets target their shill Cuba to deploy Che Guevara ...more
Janet
I found this book in a bathroom basket of “our” summertime condo at Navarre Beach. The title caught my eye just as the Navy helicopters do by chopping away at balcony level. Special Ops is the final book in WEB Griffin’s Brotherhood of War series. Published in 2001, but set in the ‘60’s, the novel is filled with military drama, and of course that cocktail party culture I find so fascinating. Author William Edmond Butterworth lll is an interesting character in his own right having maintained a va ...more
Ken Dodd
The entire Brotherhood of War series is excellent. Once I read The Lieutenants I couldn't stop until I reached the end of the series. The 9 book series follows a group of characters through their careers in the military from WWII to the Vietnam era.
David
Special Ops (Brotherhood of War #9) by W.E.B. Griffin (Jove 2000) (Fiction - Military). This tale returns to 1960's Cuba and has American forces battling those of Che Guevara in unconventional warfare. My rating: 7/10, finished 2001.
Theophilus (Theo)
I really liked it, though for me, it didn't measure up to the earlier books in the series. Excellent mix of history and fiction. What brought it down a notch for me was the epilogue for book 8 summarized the characters lives and sounded very final. Then comes book 9. A good story, good continuation of the characters from earlier books, but I expected them all to be old men. Of course the timeline explains that it actually happened before book 8. That kind of detracted from the enjoyable at the b ...more
Thomas Roth
This was the hardest book to get through. Seemed like all his others that i have enjoyed in the past but became laborious and disjointed. This may be an unfair rating but it is how I feel now.
George
Final book of the series, but not chronologically. Old and new characters chase Che' in the Congo; a strange mix of tactical operations combined with President Johnson's hands-on approach. I enjoyed the book and the series. Will try another Griffin series.
Greg Oaster
A little long for me. Most of Griffin's books are half as long as this one was, and wasn't nearly as interesting as the rest of the series. He should have stopped at the Generals
Tom
A fictional account of the U.S. Special Forces successful interdiction of Che Guevera's efforts to spark rebellion in the Congo and thus bring Communism to Africa.
Kevin R.
Characters in the series have always been very solid. This book I thought had a bit too much detail, and a lot less character. Not bad, but not my favorite.
Dj
This book is meant for vets or something who want to obsess about rank and military accomplishments. Too little action, way too much army talk.
James Preston
This book was pretty actiony. There were some parts that were hard to get through, but it got better towards the end.
Bill Jackman
My least favorite of the Brotherhood of War series. The characters are not as complex as most of Griffin's characters.
Flo
Great story on how US special forces thwart Che Guevarra's attempt to ignite Simba rebels in the Congo.
Barbara
The last that I could find in my library in this series. I think I'm done with this author for a while.
Robin Halvorson
A good story, a pity he abandoned the storyline with this one.
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W.E.B. Griffin is one of several pseudonyms for William E. Butterworth III.

From the Authors Website:

W.E.B. Griffin is the #1 best-selling author of more than fifty epic novels in seven series, all of which have made The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and other best-seller lists. More than fifty million of the books are in print in more than ten languages, including Heb
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More about W.E.B. Griffin...

Other Books in the Series

Brotherhood of War (9 books)
  • The Lieutenants (Brotherhood of War, #1)
  • The Captains (Brotherhood of War, #2)
  • The Majors (Brotherhood of War, #3)
  • The Colonels (Brotherhood of War, #4)
  • The Berets (Brotherhood of War, #5)
  • The Generals (Brotherhood of War, #6)
  • The New Breed (Brotherhood of War, #7)
  • The Aviators (Brotherhood of War, #8)
The Hostage (Presidential Agent, #2) Semper Fi (The Corps, #1) By Order of the President (Presidential Agent, #1) The Lieutenants (Brotherhood of War, #1) The Berets (Brotherhood of War, #5)

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