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Finder, Vol. 01: Sin-Eater 1
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Finder, Vol. 01: Sin-Eater 1 (Finder #1)

4.06 of 5 stars 4.06  ·  rating details  ·  432 ratings  ·  30 reviews
Finder details the life of Jaeger, aboriginal detective, a scout and tracker of powerful loyalties but few allegiances. Sin-Eater throws him into the vortex of a complex and unravelable plot that he may have set in motion himself.

Finder is a drawn book that reads like a movie storyboard. Extensive notes and commentary by the author are included.

Paperback, 168 pages
Published August 21st 1999 by Kogan Page
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This is probably the weakest of the Finder collections. Notice how many stars I give it, regardless?

The only problem with this story is that the first issue is visually and metaphorically overflowing with images, narratives, and ideas. It was overwhelming and confusing the first time I read it; it's a bit overwhelming now. After that first issue, though, Carla hits her stride. She has never lost a step since. Finder is perhaps the most perfect virtuoso performance of a writer-artist in the comic
Dec 26, 2007 Tina rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: comics
3.5. I think I came to this book with too-high expectations? It's a really, really interesting world (made even more so by reading the notes at the end of the book), but plot-wise (and character-wise, really), SO MUCH is left unexplained, or half-explained, and I don't do well with that. Basically, you're just thrown into this world full of interesting people and ideas, and you never quite get your footing. Threads are presented that are never picked up again. Nothing is resolved. It's just like ...more
Carl Walker
I actually expected this to be a lot rougher than it ended up being. Don't get me wrong... it still is a bit rough, but in may ways it's a promising beginning, and the world-building is definitely impressive. I am very glad that I was able to get a library copy of this volume, rather than the hardcovers which were unfortunately shrunk down to "digest-size." There's already more detail than you can easily absorb even at full-size! Reading a reduced version would have driven me nuts. Wish they wou ...more
Ed Erwin
I just went back and read this (and volume 2) for the third time. After having read all rest of the books in the series, this was much easier and more rewarding to read.

The story takes place in an extremely complex world and centers on some emotionally fractured characters with rich backstories. The reader is thrown in with little preparation, so lots of things are hard to understand at first. The story, or intersecting stories, are told via flash-backs, flash-forwards, dream sequences, etc., an
Mikael Kuoppala
Carla Speed McNeil's webcomic takes us to a future world of domed cities where a hierarchical clan system supports society. Our protagonist is Jeager, an aboriginal living outside the metropolises, drifting from place to place. Among his people Jaeger is a sin-eater, a man who takes the blemishes of others to bear, contaminated but respected.

McNeil's storytelling is messy and poorly paced, but she does have some interesting ideas about culture and the form different class systems can take and ho
Peter Tupper
(This review refers to both volumes of the story.)

The bare bones of the story: Jaeger, a scout/detective with regenerating powers, comes to the domed city of Anvard. He's sworn to help an old army friend, Brig, find his wife, Emma, and daughters. Problem is, Emma and her daughters walked two hundred miles to get away from Brig.

McNeil talks about a lot in this story: class, gender, race, religion, coming of age, stranger in a strange land, cities, mental illness, family dynamics, artistic expres
Randy Lander
Finder is an immensely ambitious, occasionally frustrating but mostly thoroughly entertaining read. Carla Speed McNeil has crafted a pretty immense world here, and it's clear from reading the comic pages and the annotations that there's so much more than she's able to get into the book.

That's good in that the world feels fully realized, and bad in that, as others have noted, the story sometimes feels maddeningly vague or incomplete. Without the annotations at the back, some of the story cues in
Adam Boisvert
As I was reading this for the first time, I thought there was a lot of interesting things going on, but I mostly found the story very confusing: many of the characters look alike, it jumps around in time a bit, there's lots of side stories that may-or-may-not relate the the main plot, some pages had dozens of references to odd things (most of which I still don't get), and many of the characters display unconventional morality. Then I found the author's notes at the end (annotated by page by page ...more
Edward Rathke
Interesting setting and some cool worldbuilding elements.

Kind of narratively scattered, strung together by a protagonist who isn't as interesting as the writer thinks he is.

Still a very interesting read, and a nice enough opening to a serial.
Luke Bailey
Aug 28, 2007 Luke Bailey rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: anyone who wants to read an 'aboriginal sci-fi' comic
i gave this 3 stars but I reckon I will give the sequel 4, as it takes a while to get a grip on the characters' world. plus the artwork is not jaw-dropping (and b/w), and you have to get used to the ubiquitous presence of furries, which i admit is aggravating.

but all that aside, the attention to detail in the artwork and storytelling is amazing. the intricacies of the setting itself are much deeper than one might give credit for at face value-- if you read it, you really have to go through the e
Mar 19, 2010 K T rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: comics
Random library grab, along with volumes 4 and 5 (why don't they number the covers?). Kept my interest, though I did skim a lot of sections that were too much 'clever' text or philosophizing. Felt like a lot of set-up (although very vague and unclear set-up), maybe something actually happened in volume 2? Also had that plotless feel of a webcomic, which I guess it started out as.

As far as world-building, you get the impression that the author did a lot of thinking about it, but what we actually s
Wow was the first word I could think to say upon finishing this. Finder isn't so much of a graphic novel as it is an experience. Finder immerses you within Speed's world, and it is not only a world: it is a world with a history, and fully developed cultures that all must interact with one another. It's a world that you get no introduction to, you're simply thrust within it and expected to keep up. I think I suffered culture shock while reading it, it's really THAT complex.

I for one cannot wait t
In terms of the depth of the fictional world it creates, the closest thing I can compare it to is Ursula LeGuin's _Always Coming Home_. Even without reading the extensive notes at the end of the book, you can see that McNeil seems to have developed a backstory not only for every character, but also for most elements of the physical world they live in. However, where LeGuin doesn't attempt an overarching narrative and lets the depth of the world be the point, McNeil has a central story, but it se ...more
I got the impression after reading this that the author has a very rich, detailed world envisioned in which this story takes place. This world is full of years and years of history and social quirks which, unfortunately for the read, you are dumped into the middle of and given very little explaination or introduction to. I felt like I was on the outside of a very funny inside joke the entire time I spent reading this story. Perhaps future volumes of this series will bring the reader up to speed, ...more
I LOVE the Finder series. Carla Speed McNeil has a complete world in her volumes. It's thought out and interconnected, along with footnotes in the back of the volume for extra info. I really like that aspect as it's not important to the story to know every piece of info, but if you're curious about one thing or another it adds an extra dimension. I am always voraciously curious about such things so I love it.

The characters vary; this one is set with the main character of most of the volumes, whe
Clare Bohning
Finder. Read it; it's fantastic.
Jonathan Towne
When I asked her about it, Carla herself said to me, "I tried to do too much here." If that is true, it is only evident in the astonishing density of this story. Every page of it is packed with detail, such that it becomes overwhelming and you must soak in it. I didn't fully understand the story until I had read it a few times. The good news, though, is that it's a fast read, with excellent notes. Also McNeil's art gets better and better.
J.S. McLean
I found Carla Speed McNeil as a random purchase in a battered comic book store, and Sin-Eater was probably one of the greatest things to ever grace it's shelves. I loved the concept, the artwork, and the moxie it took for her to get published, or however that works; I haven't read all of the series, because finding them was once upon a time hard work, but I plan to. Worth the effort, certainly.
A very dense comic, with a great story. Unspecific future? time, maybe not on earth? Deep characters, extremely detailed world whose back story is helpfully explained by the notes for each page that are in the back of the book.

I want more, so Vol 2, here I come...
Just not my taste. a bit too out there/nonlinear. Illustration style a bit too utilitarian. plot line a bit too disconnected. also, I have trouble when dialect is written into the text. takes me out of the story.
This got so much love back in the day, but when I finally tried it I found the narrative almost completely missing and the visual flow confounding. Probably one of the worst comics reading experiences I can recall.
A little hard to get into at first, and some of the art is kind of raw. But this series will reward the dedicated reader with lots of very interesting ideas and the art and story gets better with each volume.
Brilliant well constructed speculative fiction of the future with amazing internal cohesiveness. Believable characters dealing with everyday issues not seen in real life or other fiction.
Noah Easterly
interesting art and world building, with a fragmented story that doen't quite pull together at the denouement. A bit risqué at times, but absolutely fitting with the characters.
It's dense and unpolished (compared to her later work), but I like it more each time I go back to it.
Amir Mishali
When an author needs to explain his book in the backpages, you know that there's something wrong.
Scott McCloud calls this "the best comic you've never read." I won't presume to contradict him.
Jarad Coats
Nearly a four. This is a wonderful, funny, imaginative, thoughtful series. Love it.
update: re-read in May 2013.
Gosh do I love worldbuilding.
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Other Books in the Series

Finder (10 books)
  • Finder, Vol. 02: Sin-Eater 2
  • Finder, Vol. 03: King of the Cats
  • Finder, Vol. 04: Talisman
  • Finder: Dream Sequence
  • Finder: Mystery Date
  • Finder Volume 7: The Rescuers (Finder, 7)
  • Finder, Vol. 08: Five Crazy Women
  • Finder, Vol. 09: Voice
  • Finder: Third World

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