Iliad and Odyssey. Done into English Prose
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Iliad and Odyssey. Done into English Prose

4.01 of 5 stars 4.01  ·  rating details  ·  32,675 ratings  ·  353 reviews
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into pri...more
Paperback, 678 pages
Published November 10th 2010 by Nabu Press (first published -800)
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Lucinda Reed
Sep 17, 2011 Lucinda Reed rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: people who like the classics
The best story ever-it has everything-love, romance, war, brave, handsome men, exotic places, monsters, beautiful women-its all in these two stories. Odysseus is my all-time favorite hero, and although he is a brave hero, he has his faults and it's this combination that makes him so lovable and what makes this story one of the greatest of all time. The text can be difficult to read, and following the who's who of the gods and goddesses can be quite a feat. I've read it several times, I never get...more
Keivan
The translation was pretty readable. This is part of the Great Books of the western world Collection that I have set out to read.

Ulysses is my favorite Greek hero.Always was always will be. I read parts of some butchered version in high-school but this one seems to have satisfied my goddess needs.

I think we perhaps need some revitalization of the sentiments present in these books to save America from going down the cultural tubes. When the Odyssey is replaced with the "jersey Shore" cannot possi...more
Patricia
Other than the gruesome, violent images often presented in magnificent detail (hey, it is a war!), I really enjoy reading Homer's epic poem. Where else are we given such insight into stubborn Agamemnon, noble Hector, intelligent and well-spoken Odysseus, lazy and spineless Paris, guilt-ridden Helen, the wrath of the warrior Achille's and how vain he can be? We can identify with Trojan and Greek alike, agonizing with both sides over the destructiveness of war. We get the inside story on all the G...more
Christina
It didn't take me long to figure out that I'm not a Homer girl. I think the problem was partly that after years of taking in entertaining, probably dumbed down versions of the stories, the reality ended up a bit of a let down. Another problem was I had trouble liking any of the characters. Achilles? Hector? Even Odysseus? Ugh! Whiney, deceitful, and not very likeable!

The Iliad was pretty painful to get through. I forced myself to finish and didn't even get a payoff in the end. What happened to T...more
Osama Abdel Qader
@مجدي كامل المنياوي صاحب هذا الكتاب نصاب رسمي...
ينسخ عن النت والمنتديات وويكيبيديا بالحرف...
طبعا خلال 5 سنوات طبع في دار النصب العربي-القاهرة...وأعني ما يسمى دار الكتاب العربي ما يقارب الملئة كتاب...بحسبة بسيطة فإنه يؤلف كتاب كل 18 يوم و 6 ساعات....
طبعا هذا لا يعقل ولا يمر إلا على الأغبياء...
فهو وفريقه مجرد مرتزقة لا يقرأون حتى ما ينسخون من ويكيبيديا والمنتديات..فتجدها بنفس الأخطاء المطبعية....
في معرض الكتاب في الشارقة 2013 وجدت لهم قسم كبير...من الواضح أنهم يحسنون صنعا من ناحية البزنيس....وتعر...more
1marcus
The “Iliad and the Odyssey” keeps you on the edge of your seat from the beginning of the story to the end. I’m not into books like this one but I LOVED this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. All these things made me want to read the book over again and even write a book review on it.


First the adventure is wild from the start. Fighting the Cyclopes and winning made me think that no matter what the size of the pers...more
محمد الهاشمي
الإلياذة والأوديسة في نظري تستحقان أكثر من خمس نجوم..فقط هذه النسخة التي ترجمها مجدي كامل لم تكن الأفضل في نظري. قرأت نسخة بعدها بدت أفضل. لو تسنى الوقت لوجدت الكتاب ووضعت اسم المترجم وأظن أنها نسخة صدرت عن المجمع الثقافي بأبوظبي -لست متأكدا-. عموما هاتين الملحمتين فاقتا كل حدود الأزمنة وختمتا على عصور ما قبل التاريخ شعار بداية جديدة مليئة بالخيال الممتزج بالواقع وهو ما صنع فعلا عهد "التاريخ" لحضارة البشر. هذا الخيال لربما أسس بدوره دعائم فلسفة الدين والكينونة فيما بعد ولربما أنه أيضاً شكل الكثي...more
David Withun
The Iliad and the Odyssey are, of course, must-reads. It's hard to comment on classics like these, but, for those who haven't yet read them: I think the Odyssey is more entertaining than the Iliad because the action continues throughout whereas the Iliad has many breaks in the action to engage in the kind of lists of unpronounceable names you see in some places in the Old Testament of the Bible. Both of them are, however, fantastic.
Maha_a7mad
الصفحات البيضاء كثيرة و التكرار أكثر و الأخطاء الإملائية لا تحتمل
أستفدت منه القليل فقط
Lisa (Harmonybites)
Nov 19, 2012 Lisa (Harmonybites) rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
Recommended to Lisa (Harmonybites) by: Assigned in High School
Together these two works attributed to Homer are considered among the oldest surviving works of Western literature, dating to probably the eighth century BCE, and are certainly among the most influential. I can't believe I once found Homer boring. In my defense, I was a callow teen, and having a book assigned in school often tends to perversely make you hate it. But then I had a "Keats conversion experience." Keats famously wrote a poem in tribute to a translation of Homer by Chapman who, Keats...more
Greg Pitts
After being force-fed this epic poem in school I was stunned by how much I loved it! I don't even know who's translation I first read, but I've read The Iliad twice since, and Fagles' translation is the best yet. Beautiful imagery and really exciting battle scenes (really!) explaining the loyalties of The Gods and their favorites on Earth.

This book is not a chore like we have been led to believe. Trust me, I don't go out seeking ancient Greek poems. But this is great stuff and Fagles' translati...more
Shanti
The Iliad & The Odyssey-Homer, Audio
Narrated by John Lescault

The story for those who like such a classic is fabulous. I wont go into story details as most know the story. This type of read isnt for everyone but for people into the more flamboyant classic writings, Homer is wonderful.The narrator, I feel, did an absolutely fabulous job. This isnt an easy book to narrate and he did it with clarity, great pronunciation, and gave a poetic and enjoyable audio for the story and its characters. His...more
Julie
Genius. Pure Genius. In my opinion, these are two of the greatest works. My Freshman year of high school a few friends and I did a report on "The Odyssey". I will never forget the rhythym to our little "chant wrap" about the Odyssey..."We're here to tell a tale of Odysseus and his crew...and of the great adventures they all went through. So sit right back, and listen to our tail. You'll be grateful we have airplanes and you don't have to sail, sail, sail". I know, so funny! I can't remember much...more
Mary
I really enjoyed reading Homer's Odyssey and Iliad. I actually read this book of my own volition and not because I had to for school. The stories are very unique and captivating. You'll be sitting on the edge of your chair. I recommend this book to anyone who likes mythology of any kind.

I enjoyed it so much that I believe I'll give it another read after so many years and an adequate review.
Andrew Adanene
Sep 27, 2013 Andrew Adanene is currently reading it  ·  review of another edition
Strong, clever, cunning, wise, and intelligent. These are some of the few simple words that describe the classic hero. To some, Odysseus is recognized as self-absorbed and a fraud. This is wrong; Odysseus is a true hero. Odysseus' heroism can be seen through the two characteristics of strength, and intelligence. Using these, Odysseus is able to make it through the hardships of his journey.
Throughout the journey, Odysseus' strength is greatly tested. He shows strength when he blinds the Cyclops....more
Tyler Chatelain
I thoroughly enjoyed the Iliad due to the Homer's portrayal of the conflicts between man and the gods, with both even warring amongst themselves. The battle scenes become so visceral, and are fleshed out more when the concept of mortality becomes challenged by the intervention of gods in protecting certain individuals. Homer manages to make the tale seem even more powerful due to the characterization he gives for several prominent mortals and the Olympian gods. The most intriguing part of the Il...more
Patrice
I think for all the books that I cannot recall the date I read them, I'm using January 1, 2010. I was required to read these in college. The Odyssey was actually pretty good. Odysseus is a clever and determined hero and I prefer those. It was also a creative adventure and a journey which are also fun. I did not care for the Iliad. One entire chapter was a roll call for the Greeks invading Troy. I don't like Achilles. For a legendary Greek warrior he is a whiny little mama's boy. In fact, I didn'...more
Adrienne Boudreau
Jul 24, 2011 Adrienne Boudreau rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Lonely Women
A much more rewarding and passionate read as the full version, as silly as that sounds. The abridged version they make high schoolers read is, well, incredibly abridged. I feel like I got robbed of most of the story as a teen. An exciting weave of mythology and story I really enjoyed the Odyssey in it's entirity. The passion, adventure and determination all of the main characters had was enjoyable. I also enjoyed all of the Greek customs and history included, though at times, they told me way to...more
Jennuineglass
I knooooow I am supposed to love this. Its like a badge that smart people wear. Ohhh look, I've read it and I loooooved it. Well I'm smart, read it in college, and really couldn't stand it. Perhaps it was because, at the time, I was sick to death of reading books like this. Classics from dead white males that the collegiate collective said, "yes...I bequeath thee mandatory reading for the smartie society"...but I just never got into these.

Shrug...

Its just not my thing. No offense Homer...I just...more
Mike Anastasia
This series, considered by most to be the cornerstone of western society, may be one of the greatest stories told in recorded history. Absolutely timeless and omnieducational, Dr. Fagles' version is the definitive translation for English-speaking scholars the world over.

The Iliad was to the Hellenistic (Greek) peoples as the Bible is to Catholics. The epic undertones crossing the lives of Achilles, Phoenix, Menelaus, Agamemnon, Ajax and so, so many others are as a firework finale across an azure...more
Katie Taylor
I had only read parts of the Odyssey in high school and decided that it was time to read the whole thing. And with a college degree separating the two experiences, I was better able to understand and dissect the book. And my main conclusion, I am the wrong gender and living in the wrong century to throughly enjoy this book. There were several things that I found troubling.

First, so much time is spent praising Odysseus' wife, Penelope, on her faithfulness, even when she is being wooed by all the...more
Jesse
These are ideal translations. The Odyssey is the greatest story ever told. If God replaced everyone's religious books with the Odyssey, then we could call him a just God. Despite the subject matter, The Iliad is a calming read, except during the catalogue of ships. Essential reading for those considering enjoying life and learning.
Sami
I read the Lagerlöf/Bendz translation into Swedish.

They are masterpieces,
Bryan Carson
Oh man, these books are intense. For those with big imaginations, who enjoy mythology, war, and history type books, this is a must. They can get pretty difficult to read at times, given that subject nature and the fact that since this story was recited to audiences of the general time, they had foreknowledge of events and people/places.

The foreword also blew my mind, usually I skip them but I'm glad I did not skip this one. Among other things, he posits that this epic was most likely recited......more
Cedric
Oh hell.
I thought I was an intelligent human being until I tried to read this. I think I'm going to go back to picture books now.
Winston
It is amazing how much of what I have been exposed to in Greek myths and stories is contained in these two works. These books contain so many great characters and scenes, all put together in a very readable narrative.
The storytelling is somewhat redundant, probably due to the fact that this was a compilation of a number of different stories originally in the oral tradition, so the redundancies can be explained as a kind of refresher along the way ("On the previous episode of The Odyssey...")
The...more
Christopher Rush
I can't add much to the legacy of commentary and criticism about Homer, so I will only mention some of my observations over the last few months of slowly reading through Samuel Butler's Homer. The most noticeable frustration is Butler's use of Roman names instead of Greek names for these heroes and deities. I don't mind Tennyson called him Ulysses, but Homer certainly called him Odysseus (or his Greek version). There is no need for this, since it is a prose translation - Butler is not trying to...more
David
Homer reminds one of how many layers behind which the passing ages have covered over (but not altered) raw human nature. Love, tenderness, gore, fury, altruism, honor, terror, loyalty, betrayal, mythology and ultimate justice can all be found jumbled together on any given page. Writing long before ratings, long before genres and an eternity before political correctness, Homer grabs hold of you like The Stargate and flings you head over heels back in time to an age of wonder, peril, greed, vengea...more
Paul
I have started (belatedly) on rading more of the Great Books series. We have several of them. The Illiad is the second I have completed. I am torn in recommending this; on the one hand the descriptive language is a joy, and the characters are, for the most part, very complex and well-rounded. But without a background in the world of (roughly)1200BC and the Greek culture of the time, there is a lot of difficulty. If you haven't read about the strong cultural values of hospitality you don't get wh...more
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903
In the Western classical tradition, Homer (Greek: Όμηρος) is considered the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest of ancient Greek epic poets. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.
When he lived is unknown. Herodotus estimates that Homer lived 400 years before his own time,...more
More about Homer...
The Odyssey The Iliad The Odyssey, Book 1-12 The Iliad/The Odyssey/The Aeneid The Children's Homer: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Tale of Troy

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“Rage - Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles,
murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many sturdy souls,
great fighters' souls, but made their bodies carrion,
feasts for the dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving toward its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles.”
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